03 Leviticus - 2012

Skip Heitzig

As the Israelites camped before Mount Sinai, the Lord gave them His law, and the people gave a promise that they would obey it. But because God knew they would not be able to keep their promise, he instituted offerings and sacrifices to make atonement through the shedding of blood.

The book of Leviticus, written by Moses, details the sacrificial system of the nation of Israel, including the shedding of the blood of an innocent animal, which showed the seriousness of sin.

In his comprehensive, verse-by-verse study of Leviticus, Skip Heitzig shows how central this book is to our understanding of the atoning sacrifice of Christ, and how the theme of this book is the pure worship of God.

Visit expoundabq.org for more information on this series.


 

Table of Contents

# SCRIPTURE: MESSAGE:
1 Leviticus 1-4 Leviticus 1-4
2 Leviticus 5-7 Leviticus 5-7
3 Leviticus 8-9 Leviticus 8-9
4 Leviticus 1-9 Review
5 Leviticus 10-11:23 Leviticus 10-11:23
6 Leviticus 11:24-13:59 Leviticus 11:24-13:59
7 Leviticus 14 Leviticus 14
8 Leviticus 15-16:6 Leviticus 15-16:6
9 Leviticus 16:7-17:9 Leviticus 16:7-17:9
10 Leviticus 17:10-16 Leviticus 17:10-16
11 Leviticus 18:1-19:18 Leviticus 18:1-19:18
12 Leviticus 19:17-21:12 Leviticus 19:17-21:12
13 Leviticus 21:13-22:33 Leviticus 21:13-22:33
14 Leviticus 23 Leviticus 23
15 Leviticus 24:1-25:34 Leviticus 24:1-25:34
16 Leviticus 25:35-27:34 Leviticus 25:35-27:34

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 1-4
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 1-4
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2404

MESSAGE SUMMARY
The book of Leviticus may not be your favorite book in the Bible—it's full of rules and regulations, and bloody, messy sacrifices. But all Scripture is inspired by God, and through our study of Leviticus, we gain a better understanding of temple life in the New Testament and unveil God's presence, undo shallow patterns of worship, and reveal God's holiness. As we begin our study of the book of Leviticus, we learn the rules and reasons for the burnt offering, the grain offering, the peace offering, and the sin offering.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 1-3
"If his offering is a burnt sacrifice of the herd, let him offer a male without blemish; he shall offer it of his own free will at the door of the tabernacle of meeting before the Lord" (Leviticus 1:3).

PREVIEW: In Leviticus 1-3, we learn about the burnt, grain, and peace offerings and we discover how they are symbolic of what Jesus has done for those who are in Him.

Leviticus Outline:
The Burnt Offering - Read Leviticus 1:1-17
The Grain Offering - Read Leviticus 2:1-16
The Peace Offering - Read Leviticus 3:1-17


The Burnt Offering - Read Leviticus 1:1-17
1. The word Leviticus means "relating to the Levites." The book outlines the way of approach to God by sacrifice (chapters 1-16) and the walk of holiness before God by separation (chapters 17-27). Who were the Levites? (See Exodus 4:14 and 28:1.)



2. In this book, we see the sacrifices that allowed sinful man to approach a Holy God. These sacrifices were part of the covenant (Genesis 12:1-3 and 15:9-10) that God established with man, but they were a shadow of things to come. What did these sacrifices point to? (See Hebrews 8:5, 10:1, Colossians 2:17, and 1 Peter 3:18.)


3. What animal(s) could be offered as a burnt offering (vv. 5, 10, and 14)?



4. What stipulations were made for the burnt offering (v. 3)?



5. What did the individual offering a bull as a burnt offering have to do as part of the sacrifice (vv. 4-9)?



6. As the person offering the sacrifice put his hand on the head of the burnt offering, what happened spiritually between the person and God (v. 4)? (See also Leviticus 4:20, 26, and 31.)



7. The word atonement (v. 4) means "a making at one," at-one-ment, the state of being at one or being reconciled. So, atonement is reconciliation between the person making the burnt offering and Holy God. How was atonement achieved (vv. 5-9)?




8. List some ways that the burnt offering is a picture of Jesus. (See John 1:29, Romans 3:23-26, 5:9, 1 Corinthians 15:3, Ephesians 5:2, and 1 Peter 2:24.)




9. Read Romans 12:1-2. How is the burnt offering a picture of how we ought to be devoted to God?




The Grain Offering - Read Leviticus 2:1-16



10. What elements comprised the grain offering (v.1)?



11. When the worshiper brought the grain offering to the priests, what did the priest do with it (vv. 2-3)?



12. Frankincense is a resin that emits a fragrant odor when burnt. Where else was frankincense used in the Tabernacle? (See Exodus 30:34-38.)



13. When the priest burnt the grain offering, what was the result (v. 2)?


14. Each offering was important to God. What words describe the grain offering (v. 3)?



15. The grain offering symbolized service to God. How is service to God described in these passages; 2 Corinthians 2:14-17, Philippians 4:18, Hebrews 13:15-16?



16. Oil was required to be included in the grain offering (vv. 1, 4, 7, 15). Oil is often a picture of the work and person of the Holy Spirit (anointing and healing). How is the Holy Spirit required in our service to God? (See John 14:12,16-17, and 15:5, Acts 1:5, 1 Corinthians 2:13-16, and 1 Timothy 1:12.)



17. If the grain offering was baked in a covered pan, what did the priest do with it (vv. 7-10)?



18. What ingredients were forbidden from being included in the grain offering (v. 11)?



19. What additional ingredient is required in the grain offering (v. 13)? (See also Numbers 18:19 and 2 Chronicles 13:5.)




The Peace Offering - Read Leviticus 3:1-17



20. The peace offering could be a bull, a lamb, or a goat (vv. 1, 7, and 12). What did the person making the peace offering have to do to the animal (v. 2)?



21. What were the priests to do with the pieces of the peace offering that were removed (v. 11)?



22. Why did the priest remove and burn these pieces (v. 16)?



23. What two things were the children of Israel forbidden to eat (v. 17)?



24. The peace offering is also referred to as a fellowship offering. It is through this offering that sinful man could have fellowship with Holy God. How is Jesus Christ our peace offering? (See Ephesians 2:14-18.)



25. As our peace offering, what does Jesus Christ provide those who believe and receive Him as Lord and Savior? (See Romans 5:1.)



26. As our peace offering, what else does Jesus Christ provide those who believe and receive Him as Lord and Savior? (See John 14:27, Isaiah 26:3, and Philippians 4:6–8.)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Leviticus – the middle book in the first five books of Moses
    2. Favorite book in the Bible
    3. New Year's resolutions to read the Bible
    4. Laws, rules, regulations that don't seem to apply to my life
    5. Jewish children read Leviticus as their first book – purity of worship of God
    6. Lofty passages "Love your neighbor…" (see Leviticus 19:18 and Matthew 19:19)
    7. Why should I read this book?
      1. No immediate "feel-good" reaction
      2. Dig deeper to get principles
      3. All Scripture is given by inspiration of God (see 2 Timothy 3:16)
      4. Whatever was written before was written for learning, comfort and hope (see Romans 15:4)
    8. What will this study of Leviticus do for you?
      1. It will unlock other books of the Bible, i.e. Hebrews, NT passages about temple life
      2. It will unveil the presence of God in all aspects of your life
      3. It will undo shallow patterns of worship
      4. It will underscore the holiness of God, unapproachable by sinful man
        1. Holy—Hebrew word קֹ֥דֶשׁ; qodesh
        2. Atonement for sins
        3. Holiness/sanctification a major theme
        4. Be holy because I am holy (see Leviticus 11:44-45)
        5. Learn to discern what is holy and what is not holy
    9. The people don't move in this book—Remember Exodus 25 – Mount Sinai
      1. Moses in the presence of God
      2. He receives the Ten Commandments/stone tablets
      3. The people worship a golden calf
      4. Moses grinds the gold to powder, puts it in water, and forces the people to drink it
      5. There's a national repentance
      6. Moses goes back up the mountain, gets new tablets, and renews the covenant with God
      7. Cloud of God rests on them there
      8. The book of Leviticus begins and ends (geographically) in this place
    10. This is the book of Leviticus—name of the book
      1. Hebrews name it וַיִּקְרָ֖א wayyiqra, He Spoke
      2. Book named for the first few words in the book
      3. Name changed around 2000 years ago to Torah Kohanim, it was renamed to the Law of the Priest
      4. Septuagint version called it Leuitikón
      5. The name Levite only appears twice in the book
      6. A book pertaining to the operation of the worship system superintended by the tribe of Levi
  2. Offerings to God
    1. The burnt offering
      1. עֹלָ֤ה; the olah, "burnt"
      2. Totally consumed except the hide
      3. Bring a cow, bull, sheep, goat, turtle dove or pigeons according to financial provision
      4. A male without blemish v.3 – give your best to God
        1. Human tendency
        2. Malachi 1:8, the prophet denounces them for bringing second best
      5. Worshiper, places hand on head, slits the throat
        1. Sprinkle the blood
        2. The priest prepares the sacrifice and the wood and the fire
        3. Burn all on the fire
        4. This is a bloody ordeal—shows the awful nature of sin—sin kills
        5. Shows the graciousness of God—He is willing to forgive you
      6. Sheep or goat v. 10
      7. Turtle doves or pigeons v. 14
        1. This is foreign to us, we get our meat in a package
          1. Sight, sound, and smell of a slaughter house is nauseating
          2. They lived closer to life and death, this was a dignified part of their worship
        2. The worshiper was all in
          1. He's involved
          2. He helps reenact the drama of redemption
          3. It costs his something (see 2 Samuel 24:18-24)
          4. It was personal
      8. What do these sacrifices have to do with me personally?
        1. Romans 12:1-2: "Present your bodies a living sacrifice"
        2. Be consumed with what the Lord wants
    2. The grain offering -  chapter 2
      1. מִנְחָה; Minchah – a gift that comes from grain
      2. Not bloody
      3. Sacrifice of the work of your hands
      4. Fine flour—a token amount
      5. Frankincense
      6. Baked
        1. In the oven
        2. In a pan
        3. In a covered pan
      7. No yeast
        1. Fermentation/degradation
          1. A type of corruption or sin
          2. Jesus called the leaven of the Pharisees hypocrisy (see Matthew 15:5-12 and Luke 12:1)
          3. Paul also uses it as a negative(see 2 Corinthians 5:6 and Galatians 5:9)
        2. No honey
          1. Why?
          2. Two options
            1. Pagans used honey
            2. Ancient scholar Maimonides said God wanted pure worship, not tainted with pagan rituals
            3. Honey could also mean preserves which is human-made from dates
          3. Usually the person who thinks they are sweet—good enough are the hardest to witness to
          4. It's those who know they are corrupt and wasted and sees their need for salvation—"Blessed are the poor in spirit" (Matthew 5:3)
        3. Season with salt
          1. Gives flavor
          2. Preserves
          3. Jesus said, "You are the salt" (Matthew 5:13)
          4. You are to give flavor to the company you keep
          5. You preserve your culture by your values
          6. Ancient times, a covenant, meal eaten, salt of the covenant (see Numbers 18:19 and 2 Chronicles 13:5)
      8. All that I have comes from God, God has blessed the work of my hands
    3. The peace offering – chapter 3
      1. Hebrew: זבח שלמים Zevach Shelamim, slaughter that brings well-being
      2. From the heard, male or female
      3. Kill it
      4. Sprinkle the blood
      5. Burn on the alter
      6. This is a different offering
        1. A meal that you will share with your family
        2. Part consumed on alter
        3. Part give to the priests as their compensation
        4. The rest of it you will take home
        5. Have a huge party of celebration of the peace of God
      7. The fat
        1. "Themz da innards!"
        2. Oriental broad-tailed sheep
          1. Tail is 10 to 20 pounds and stores excess body fat
          2. Delicacy
      8. Shalom
        1. Peace
        2. Satisfaction
        3. Well-being
        4. Knowing that I am in a right relationship with God
        5. God has welcomed us in fellowship
      9. Don't eat fat, or blood
        1. Remember council in Jerusalem (see Acts 15:18-29)
        2. "Life of the flesh is in the blood" (see Leviticus 17:11)
        3. Jehovah Witnesses
      10. How does this offering apply to me personally?
        1. Be more thankful for the goodness of God
        2. Be more celebratory of the goodness of God
        3. Ministry: Dinner for Eight
        4. There is well-being because of God
        5. Friend opening restaurant
    4. Sin offering – chapter 4
      1. Grain offering
      2. Hebrew – חַטָּאָה; chattatah-miss the mark
        1. God has set the mark
        2. You didn't make the mark
        3. All have sinned (see Romans 3:23)
        4. Contest to run up trail—nobody made it
      3. Sin on purpose or unintentionally
      4. Whole congregation v. 13
      5. Tribal ruler
      6. Psychologically good
        1. We feel really bad if we hurt or kill someone
        2. Have to live with survivor's guilt
        3. God provided a way to atone for unintentional sin
      7. Differences
        1. High priest sins
        2. Ruler or individual sins
      8. Benefit is forgiveness
      9. This is a compulsory offering
        1. The first three offerings were voluntary
        2. Hard because everyone would know you sinned
        3. You are making a public confession and are guaranteed forgiveness (see 1 John 1:9)
  3. Conclusion—Teaser
    1. Historians and scholars will point to other gods and say that this is just another primitive form of worship
    2. What is the hole in their argument?
    3. What makes this sacrifice different than all the others?

Hebrew terms: קֹ֥דֶשׁ; qodesh-holy; וַיִּקְרָ֖א; wayyiqra-called; תּוֹרַת כֹּהֵן; torah kohanim-the law of the priest; עֹלָ֤ה; olah-that which goes up; מִנְחָה; minchah-offering; זבח שלמים; Zevach Shelamim-a sacrifice for alliance or friendship, peace offering; חַטָּאָה; chatta'ah, sin
Greek terms: Λευϊτικόν; Leuitikón, Leviticus
Figures referenced: Maimonides
Cross references: Exodus 25, Leviticus 11:44-45, Leviticus 17:11, Leviticus 19:18, Numbers 18:19, 2 Samuel 24:18-24, 2 Chronicles 13:5, Malachi 1:8, Matthew 5:3, Matthew 13, Matthew 15:5-12, Matthew 19:19, Luke 12:1, Acts 15:18-29, Romans 3:23, Romans 12:1-2, Romans 15:4, 2 Timothy 3:16, 1 John 1:9

Topic: sacrifice

Keywords: sin, offering, peace, grain, burnt, alter, priest, Levi

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 5-7
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 5-7
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2409

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In Leviticus 5-7, the laws of the offerings are given. We discover how God deals with the very real issue of sin. There must be a sacrifice in order for atonement to take place. Through our text, we see the only system of religion that God gave to man and how that system was fulfilled in Jesus Christ.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 5-7

"So the priest shall make atonement for him before the LORD, and he shall be forgiven for any one of these things that he may have done in which he trespasses” (Leviticus 6:7).

PREVIEW: In Leviticus 5-7, the laws of the offerings are given—laws which must be followed for atonement to take place.

Leviticus Outline:
The Trespass Offering - Read Leviticus 5:1-13
Offerings with Restitution - Read Leviticus 5:14-6:7
The Law of the Burnt Offering - Read Leviticus 6:8-13
The Law of the Grain Offering - Read Leviticus 6:14-23
The Law of the Sin Offering - Read Leviticus 6:24-30
The Law of the Trespass Offering - Read Leviticus 7:1-10
The Law of Peace Offerings - Read Leviticus 7:11-21
Fat and Blood May Not Be Eaten - Read Leviticus 7:22-27
The Portion of Aaron and His Sons - Read Leviticus 7:28-38

The Trespass Offering - Read Leviticus 5:1-13
1. In our culture, we’re familiar with signs that say “No Trespassing” and understand their meaning to be “You are not allowed here.” Biblically, a trespass is a violation of social ethics or an unlawful act committed on the person, property, or rights of another. What might cause a person to bear guilt in hearing the utterance of an oath (v. 1)?




2. Proverbs 29:24 contains an example of a person who swears to tell the truth, but doesn’t, thus making himself guilty of a trespass. What does that passage say the partner of a thief does? Why do you think he does that?




3. Why should we speak the truth when we know it? (See Psalm 32:2, 2 Corinthians 4:2, Colossians 3:9, 1 Timothy 4:12, and James 4:7.)




4. List the things a person might touch that would make him unclean and guilty of a trespass (vv. 2-3). (Read also Leviticus 11:24-39 and Numbers 19:11-16)




5. How could a person become guilty of a trespass with his lips (v. 4)?




6. What did Jesus say we should do about swearing (making a vow)? (See Matthew 5:33-37 and James 5:12.)




7. What was the first thing the person guilty of a trespass was to do (v. 5)? Why is this such an important thing to do? (See Psalm 32:5, Proverbs 28:13)





8. When the person guilty of a trespass acknowledged their sin, they were to bring a female lamb or goat from the flock as a sin offering. What was the priest’s role in helping this person with their guilt (v. 6)?




9. If the person guilty of a trespass could not afford to bring a lamb, what two things could they substitute (v. 7)? What did the priest do with the first of the substitutionary offerings (vv. 8-9)? What did the priest with the second of the substitutionary offerings (v. 10)?




10. If the person guilty of a trespass could not afford to bring the substitutionary offering, what could they bring (v. 11)? What was not to be included with this offering and why (v. 11)? What did the priest do with this offering (vv. 12-13)?




Offerings with Restitution - Read Leviticus 5:14-6:7
11. If a person unintentionally committed a trespass in regard to the holy things of the LORD, what was he to offer (v. 15)? What was he to include with it (v. 15)? What was he to add to it (v. 15)?




12. If a person was guilty of a trespass by committing a sin which they weren’t even aware they had done, what were they to offer (vv. 17-18)?





13. If a person lied about what was entrusted to him for safekeeping, about a pledge, or about a robbery, if he extorted from his neighbor, or if he found what was lost and lied about it, what was he to do (Leviticus 6:1-7)?





The Law of the Burnt Offering - Read Leviticus 6:8-13
14. What was the priest to put on in order to remove the ashes from the altar (v. 10)? What was he to do with the ashes (v. 10)?




15. What was the priest to do before he carried the ashes outside the camp (v. 11)? Where was he to put the ashes of the burnt offering?





16. How often were the priests to tend the fire of the altar (v. 12-13)?




The Law of the Grain Offering - Read Leviticus 6:14-23
17. What were the priests to do with a portion of the grain offering, its oil, and all of the frankincense (v. 15)?




18. What were the priests to do with the remainder of the grain offering (v. 16)? What were they not to do with it (v. 17)? Who specifically, could eat the grain offering (v. 18)?





19. When the priests made a grain offering for themselves, when were they to offer it (v. 20)? The priests did not eat their own grain offering; instead, what did they do with it (v. 23)?





The Law of the Sin Offering - Read Leviticus 6:24-30
20. Where was the sin offering killed (v. 25)?




21. What became of the sin offering (v. 26)?




22. What was required in order for a person to touch the flesh of the sin offering (v. 27)?




23. What did the priest need to do if blood was sprinkled on his garment (v. 27)?




24. What needed to be done to the vessels in which the sin offering was boiled (vv. 28-29)?




The Law of the Trespass Offering - Read Leviticus 7:1-10
25. Where was the trespass offering to be killed (v. 2)?




26. What was offered and burnt in a trespass offering (vv. 3-5)?




27. How was the trespass offering like the sin offering (v. 7)?




28. If a priest made the burnt offering for someone, what did he get to keep (v. 8)? Why do you think he kept this?




The Law of Peace Offerings - Read Leviticus 7:11-21
29. If a peace offering was make for a thanksgiving, what was offered with it (vv. 12-13)?




30. The flesh of a peace offering, if it was offered for thanksgiving, was to be eaten on the same day it was offered (v. 15). If it was a vow or voluntary offering, it could be eaten the day after it was offered (v. 16). What happened if the person ate the flesh on the third day (vv. 17-18)?





31. What was to become of the flesh of the peace offering if it touched any unclean thing (v. 19)?




32. What became of a person who ate the peace offering while he was unclean (v. 20-21)?




Fat and Blood May Not Be Eaten - Read Leviticus 7:22-27
33. What could the children of Israel not do with the fat of ox, sheep and goats or an animal that dies naturally or is torn by wild beasts (v. 24)? What became of them if they did what they weren’t supposed to (v. 25)?




34. What could the children of Israel do with the fat of ox, sheep and goats or an animal that dies naturally or is torn by wild beasts (v. 24)?




35. What was forbidden concerning the blood of bird or beast (vv. 26-27)?





The Portion of Aaron and His Sons - Read Leviticus 7:28-38
36. What did the person making a peace offering need to do as part of his offering (v. 30)?




37. What portions of the peace offering belonged to the priests?




38. When was the consecrated portion commanded by the LORD established (v. 35-36)?




39. When was the law of the offerings established (vv. 37-38)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Problem – I'm a Midianite – we're intense people
      1. We live in tents
      2. I am a son of Abraham
      3. We are tribes
      4. Now another group of people have shown up around Mt. Sinai
        1. Also sons of Abraham
        2. Also live in tents
        3. Their tents are all around a larger tent
        4. Their worship and their sacrifices revolve around this central tent
        5. There's a cloud by day and a fire by night – it's miraculous
        6. Never seen anything like it
        7. They have a relationship with their God
        8. Their sins are forgiven
      5. There is a barrier, sin, between me and the Israelite God
    2. Judaism is the only religious system that God ever gave to mankind
      1. Christianity is not a religious system, it's the fulfillment of the ancient religious system
      2. Religion was pointing to the fulfillment in Jesus Christ
    3. In Santa Fe late, just wanted to eat
      1. Convenience store, microwave burritos
      2. Stomach soon felt a little queasy—uneasy—cramping
      3. 2:30 am in local emergency room
      4. Lower abdomen test – barium enema
      5. That which I have feared, has come upon me
      6. Exploratory surgery
      7. Infection in gut
      8. Denial of problem "Oh, I'm fine"
      9. Okay, I'm not fine
      10. Most people deny they have a sin nature
    4. Latin proverb – He who denies his sin, will never have it forgiven
    5. God wanted to deal with the most important issue of humanity
      1. In the old covenant, He did it through a series of sacrifices
      2. Key term – sacrifice
    6. Are there similarities of these sacrifices and pagan religious sacrifices?
      1. They are different
      2. Given by direct revelation of God
      3. Pagan systems had a hierarchy of gods
        1. Gods needed to be taken care of
        2. Eat and drink
        3. Gods weary of maintaining their own physical sustenance
        4. Forced lesser gods to feed them
        5. Lesser gods created people and forced them to care for the gods
      4. In India and Hawaii today, you'll still see food and drink placed in front of gods
      5. Judaism – sacrifices were not for nutrition
        1. For expiation – to take away sin
        2. For interrelation – now you can have a relationship with God
        3. All pointing to the day when Jesus would take away sin
        4. God is dealing with sin, sin is offensive to God
      6. Most people don't realize how offensive sin is to a holy God
      7. Without the shedding of blood, there is no remission of sins (see Hebrews 9:22)
      8. Why would God allow His Son to die? Can't sincerity be enough? Can't I just do my best?
        1. No, you can't earn it
        2. You are not as good as God
        3. Something is required
          1. Your death
          2. Or, the death of a substitute
    7. 5 offerings – burnt, grain, peace, sin, and trespass
      1. Burnt offering – Speaks of consecration of myself (see Romans 12:1)
      2. Grain offering – dedication of service to God
      3. Peace offering – celebration – holy BBQ
      4. Sin offering – atonement for your sin
      5. Trespass offering or guilt offering – restitution for the sinner
  2. The trespass offering – Leviticus 5
    1. First 13 verses seem to deal with the trespass offering
    2. Witnesses see something but refuses to tell
      1. Brought before he priest
      2. See this in the New Testament (see Matthew 26)
    3. A person touches something unclean he will be guilty
    4. Say something rash with our lips (see James 3:2, Proverbs 18:21)
      1. With your speech you have power
      2. Tombstone in England Arabella Young – took her death to shut her up
      3. The law is hold your tongue
      4. Bring sacrifice and confess
      5. Confess – the outward expression of repentance (see 1 John 1:9)
        1. To say the same thing about your sin that God says
        2. We identify sin differently than God does
        3. Heart won't be cleansed and lightened until you agree with God regarding your sin
        4.  Fredrick the Great, the Prussian king
          1. Prisoners all innocent
          2. One guilty
          3. Let him out before he corrupts all these fine people!
    5. Three types of offering
      1. Lamb or goat
      2. Two pigeons or two turtle doves
      3. Flour
      4. No matter your status you have access to forgiveness—rich or poor you could be forgiven
      5. Jesus died poor but was buried in a rich man's tomb
      6. Jesus by His death made God approachable (see John 3:16)
    6. How can a grain offering cover sin? (see Hebrews 9:22)
      1. Offered on the alter where there is blood
      2. God imputed that value
    7. The idea of sin against God has become unpopular
      1. These laws don't apply to us
      2. Mechanistic view of man
      3. B. F. Skinner
    8. Other religious systems
      1. Eastern religions
      2. Hindu – everyone stumbles and falls, whatever, in your next life...
      3. Unitarians – man is basically good and salvation is simply self-improvement – no such thing as sin
      4. Christian Science – sin is non-existent, it is an illusion, they deny its existence – grape nuts
    9. Trespass or guilt offering
      1. Besides sacrifice, have to pay back
      2. 3 sections
        1. Sins against holy things
        2. Sins against God's commands
        3. Sins against your neighbor
      3. Sins against the holy things – Leviticus 5:14-16
        1. Sin in regards to worship
        2. Details aren't given
        3. God has provision for someone in regards to worship
          1. How careful are we in preparing for worship
          2. We prepare physically
          3. Do we prepare spiritually?
          4. Watch yourself (see Ecclesiastes 5:1-5)
          5. Be sincere, dedicate the time to God
      4. Sins against God's commands – Leviticus 5:17-19
        1. Sins and doesn't know it, then finds out
        2. Conscience bothered by it (See Romans 14:23)
          1. $75 almost brand new goose down sleeping bag
          2. Felt guilty
          3. Hadn't checked it with God
          4. Returned the sleeping bag
        3. Sins against your neighbor
          1. Pay back whatever was stolen, broken, or lost 120%
          2. Realize how grave a sin lying is (see Exodus 20:16, vProverbs 6:16-19)
          3. God takes it very seriously
    10. Law of the offerings – Leviticus 6
      1. A repetition of the first five chapters
        1. Chapters 1-5 speak of the offerings from the perspective of the one bringing the offering
        2. Chapter 6-7 speak of the offerings from the priest's perspective
      2. Burnt offering voluntary became almost compulsory—morning and evening sacrifice every day
        1. Fire always burning – God saying there is always accessible, you are welcome
        2. In your own heart, you have an altar
          1. Do you keep the fires burning
          2. Rekindle the fire
            1. Maybe change the way you do devotions
            2. Sing
            3. Go on a mission
      3. The grain offering
        1. The priests and the boys could eat it
        2. It's holy
        3. You can't approach God thoughtlessly or carelessly
        4. Aaron's sons – strange fire (see Leviticus 10)
      4. The sin offering
      5. The trespass offering
        1. Don't leave any of the flesh until morning, why?
        2. Guessing for health reasons
        3. Didn't have refrigeration
        4. The only way to preserve was to rub salt in it
        5. That's the background behind Jesus saying "You are the salt of the earth" (see Matthew 5:13)
        6. Priest could eat the first or second day, but third day he would be punished if he ate it
      6. Heave and Wave offering
        1. Wave horizontal
        2. Heave vertical
        3. Ceremonial notation that this is something God has given
  3. Conclusion
    1. That Midianite looking down from Mt Sinai must have seen a slaughter house
    2. 91 times offering and sacrifice mentioned in this book
    3. Jesus said, "If you would have believed Moses..." John 5:46
    4. Jesus expounded through the Scriptures the things that pertained to him (see Luke 24)

Figures referenced: Fredrick the Great, B. F. Skinner
Cross references: Exodus 20:16, Leviticus 10, Proverbs 6:16-19, Proverbs 18:21, Ecclesiastes 5:1-5, Matthew 5:13, Matthew 26, John 3:16, John 5:46, Romans 12:1, Hebrews 9:22, James 3:2, 1 John 1:9

Topic: law

Keywords: sacrifice, priest, law, forgiveness, tongue, confession

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 8-9
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 8-9
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2411

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Worship involves both sacrifice and service. Through this study, we uncover the first congregation in history and how God commanded Moses and the people in worship and dress. These Levitical instructions are a guideline for how God desires us to be cleansed from our sins, clothed in humility, consecrated for Him, and devoted to service.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 8-10
And Moses and Aaron went into the tabernacle of meeting, and came out
and blessed the people. Then the glory of the LORD appeared to all the
people, and fire came out from before the LORD and consumed the burnt
offering and the fat on the altar. When all the people saw it, they
shouted and fell on their faces (Leviticus 9:23–24).

PREVIEW: In Leviticus 8-10, Aaron and his sons were consecrated as
priests before the Lord and the priestly ministry began in Israel. When
Nadab and Abihu tried worshiping their own way, the priest quickly
discovered that worship and service before the Lord must be done as
prescribed.

Leviticus Outline:
Aaron and His Sons Consecrated - Read Leviticus 8:1-36
The Priestly Ministry Begins - Read Leviticus 9:1-24
The Profane Fire of Nadab and Abihu - Read Leviticus 10:1-7
Conduct Prescribed for Priests - Read Leviticus 10:8-20

Aaron and His Sons Consecrated - Read Leviticus 8:1-36
1. Consecrate means to dedicate to a sacred purpose. Wh0 did the
Lord instruct Moses to gather together at the door of the tabernacle
of meeting to be used for a sacred purpose (vv. 1-3)?




2. Moses was following the commands given by God and executing
them as He instructed (v. 4). How is Moses an excellent example of
obedience to God’s commands (see Exodus 40:16)? How and why
should we also obey the commands of God (see Matthew 28:20 and
John 14:15 and 23)?




3. What was the first thing Moses did to Aaron and his sons in order to
consecrate them (v. 6)? How are we also to have this done unto
us?(See Hebrews 10:22, John 3:5, John 13:8-10, 1 Corinthians 6:11,
2 Corinthians 7:1, John 17:17, Ephesians 5:26, and Revelation 1:5.)




4. After Moses clothed Aaron (vv. 7-9) with the priestly garments, he
anointed him (v. 12). What else did he anoint? What does the
anointing oil do to the object it is placed upon? (See Exodus 30:26–
29)




5. How have we been anointed, just as Aaron and his sons were? (See
Ephesians 1:13-14, 1 Peter 2:9-10, and Revelation 1:6; 5:10; and
20:6.)




6. Moses offered a bull as a sin offering (vv. 14-17), a ram as a burnt
offering (vv. 18-21) and a second ram as a consecration and wave
offering (vv. 22-29). In each offering, who laid their hands on the
heads of the animals being offered?




7. After washing, clothing and anointing Aaron and his sons, what did
Moses put on them (vv. 23-24)? How is this same substance applied
to our lives as followers of Jesus? (See Hebrews 9:14; 22, 1Peter
1:18-19, 1John 1:7, and Revelation 1:5.)




8. How long did the consecration period last (v. 33)?




The Priestly Ministry Begins - Read Leviticus 9:1-24
9. As the priestly ministry began, on the eighth day, Moses instructed
Aaron to make offerings for himself (v.2) and to tell the children of
Israel to make offerings for themselves. What was the promised
result of making these offerings(v. 4)?




10. What did the congregation do as Aaron made these offerings (vv. 7-
21)?




11. How are we also to do what the congregation did while the high
priest Aaron interceded for them, making the sacrifices of
atonement? (See James 4:7-10, Hebrews 4:14-16; 10:19-22, and
Ephesians 3:12.)




12. Once Aaron completed the offerings, he blessed the people. What
was the blessing he proclaimed? (See Numbers 6:22–26)




13. Once the offerings were completed and Aaron blessed the people,
Moses and Aaron went into the tabernacle of meeting and came out
and blessed the people, and the glory of the Lord appeared to all
the people (vv. 22-23). What did the congregation see and what was
their response (v. 24)? (See also Ezra 3:11 and 1 Kings 18:38-39.)




The Profane Fire of Nadab and Abihu - Read Leviticus
10:1-7
14. What did Nadab and Abihu, two of Aaron’s four sons, do which the
Lord had not commanded them to do (v. 1)?




15. What was the result of what Nadab and Abihu did (v. 2)?




16. Why do you think Nadab and Abihu’s actions resulted in this
consequence?




17. What did the Lord instruct Moses to tell Aaron? What was Aaron’s
response (v. 3)? Why do you think Aaron had this response?





18. Moses called the sons of Uzziel to carry out the burned remains of
Nadab and Abihu (v. 4), and then gave difficult instructions to Aaron
and his two remaining sons. What were those instructions and why
might they have been difficult (v. 6)?




Conduct Prescribed for Priests - Read Leviticus 10:8-20
19. As a result of Nadab and Abihu’s destruction, what did the Lord
speak to Aaron (vv. 8-9)? Why were these instructions given to
Aaron (vv. 10-11)?




20. What did Moses instruct Aaron, Eleazar, and Ithamar to do (vv. 12-
15)?




21. Why was Moses angry with Eleazar and Ithamar (vv. 16-18)?




22. What did Aaron say to Moses that caused him to be content (vv. 19-
20)? Why do you think this caused Moses to be content?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. The first congregation, the first church that God called to Himself
    2. God reveals to them how to have a relationship with Him
    3. Did not have a building, they had a tent
    4. Had a few representatives
    5. Worship of God in the Old Testament
      1. Sacrifices
        1. Animal or grain
        2. Five prescribed offerings
      2. Only detergent – blood
      3. Points to the New Testament – the new covenant
        1. Practices don't apply to us
        2. Principles do
    6. Obedience
    7. Worship involves sacrifice
      1. "Therefore by Him let us continually offer the sacrifice of praise to God, that is, the fruit of our lips, giving thanks to His name" (Hebrews 13:15).
      2. You may not feel like it, make a sacrifice of praise
    8. The priesthood, worship must include service
      1.  A special group of men from a specific tribe
      2. God's original idea/intention for priest to only be from the tribe of Levi?
        1. A priesthood out of all of them (see Exodus 19:3-6)
        2. His ideal cut short because of the people's idolatry
        3. One tribe, one family – Aaron and his sons as mediators
        4. Restored in the  new covenant
          1. Priesthood of all believers (see 1 Peter 2:9)
          2. We all have approach to God
          3. Don't have to go through a system
  2. Aaron and His Sons Consecrated
    1. God instructed Moses
      1. Commanded – 20 times in chapters 8-10
        1. What to do
        2. How to do it
      2. In the New Testament we have instructions
        1. Don't have to guess
        2. Jesus announces that He will build His church
        3. In the book of Acts, we see it unfolded
        4. Paul gives principles
      3. Many fads
        1. Men need to go to the mount
        2. Get their ideal from God
        3. Faith
      4. 2.5 million people at the door of the tent, probably had heads of tribes gather (see Leviticus 9:1)
      5. Outer courtyard, water to cleanse the priest
      6. Ephod – vest over tunic
        1. Two pieces
        2. Tied together at top
        3. Two onyx stones with six names each
      7. Breastplate – square cloth around the neck of the high priest
        1. 12 beautifully ornate stone
        2. Four stones in three rows
        3. Representative of the tribes of Israel
        4. Symbolic of the them being on his heart
        5. Jesus is our great high priest (see Hebrews 4:14-16)
        6. Multi-colored stones, same stones found in New Jerusalem (see Revelation 21)
      8. Urim and Thummim
        1. Lights and perfection
        2. Not around any more
        3. Best guess, two stones to determine the will of God
        4. One stone white, one black, they would glow – just a guess
        5. Another guess, the words yes and no written on each side of stone
      9. Question: why did God set up this system and then say it was detestable?
        1. It was temporary – never meant to be permanent (see Jeremiah 31)
        2. People were bringing the sacrifices without their hearts being engaged with it – they were living a duplicitous life (See Isaiah 1)
      10. Urim and Thummim
        1. Not mystical glasses (Joseph Smith, Mormon Church)
        2. Used specifically for the Old Testament
        3. Passed from history
        4. Turban and gold plate, crown, inscribed Qodesh Yahweh, holiness to the Lord
      11. 4 steps in the ordination service
        1. Cleansing of the priests
          1. All have sinned (see Romans 3:23)
          2. You must be cleansed before preaching to anyone else about being cleansed
          3. Men in pulpits that are not saved
        2. Clothing of the priests
          1. Prescribed in Exodus 38 and 39
          2. There are sects of Christianity that believe clergy should wear a robe
          3. Jesus said, "the scribes, who desire to go around in long robes, love greetings in the marketplace" (Mark 12:38)
          4. Put on humility (see Colossians 3:12)
          5. Put on Christ (see Galatians 3:27)
          6. Story: first moved to Albuquerque, local clergy wanted to buy me a robe
        3. Consecration
          1. Oil sprinkled
          2. Who sprinkled? Only Aaron and his sons and grandsons
          3. God chose the tribe
            1. Important principle – God must call to ministry
            2. A person should be called
            3. How do you know?
            4. Evidence gifts
            5. Book: Lectures to my Students by Charles H. Spurgeon
            6. See Jeremiah 23
        4. Contribution – special sacrifices on the day of ordination
          1. When you give something to God, you make a sacrifice (see 1 Timothy 3)
          2. A good but dangerous work
          3. Stat: Every month, 1,600 ministers quit the ministry
            1. 70% said they felt a strong calling by God before they entered
            2. Only three years later 50% were sure
            3. 80% of the wives wished their husbands had chosen a different occupation
          4. It involves sacrifice
            1. No weekends off
            2. Privacy
          5. Violinist – planned neglect
          6. Sin offering, burnt offering
          7. Ram of consecration – blood on right ear, thumb and big toe
            1. Hear God's Word
            2. Do God's work
            3. Walk in God's ways
          8. Living sacrifice (see Romans 12:1)
            1. Dwight L. Moody
            2. Moses' mouth
            3. David's hands
            4. Paul's feet: "The feet of him who brings good news." (Isaiah 52:7)
            5. Your life being the base of operations for God (see 1 Corinthians 6:19)
      12. God wants to use us
        1. You are all in the priesthood
        2. Find out what your ministry is
        3. This is a great privilege
        4. If God wanted to get the job done, he would use angels
        5. Challenge: read Revelation where an angel preaches the gospel
        6. God likes to prove how wonderful He is by using the weakest instrument (see 1 Corinthians 1:27)
      13. Had to stay in the outer courtyard for 7 days
  3. Priests begin their ministry
    1. Only approach to God
      1. Blood
      2. Mediator
      3. It's a demonstration of a principle
    2. Eighth day – a new beginning
    3. Get ready, God is going to show up at church today
    4. They offer four sacrifices
      1. The priests represent the people to God
      2. Later, the prophets will represent God to the people
      3. In antiquity, fathers and kings would act as a priest
        1. Melchizedek was a king (see Hebrews 6:20)
        2. Now God reveals how it is to be done
      4. Believe the altar was raised
      5. After Aaron finished the offering, he blessed the people (see Numbers 6)
      6. Note: Jesus did the same thing
        1. Offered sacrifice on Calvary
        2. Died
        3. Rose from the dead
        4. Ascended into heaven
        5. Blessed them (see Luke 24)
      7. The glory of the Lord appeared
        1. Glory, Shekinah – manifestation of splendor, glory
        2. The presence
        3. The cloud
      8. Could refer to the next statement, "fire came out from the Lord" (v. 24)
      9. Fire from heaven was symbolic
      10. He is God, you are not – He gives the model
      11. Don't let the fire go out, that fire came out of heaven
  4. Closing – Jesus told of the Holy Spirit (see John 16:7-9)
    1. Good for you that I'm leaving
    2. I will send my Holy Spirit to you
    3. Convict the world of sin, righteousness, judgment
    4. When Jesus ascended, God said this is the sacrifice that I will accept – a righteous life

Hebrew terms: קֹ֫דֶשׁ יְהֹוָה; qodesh Yhvh, Holy Lord; כָּבוֹד; glorious
Publications referenced: Lectures to My Students, by Charles H. Spurgeon
Figures referenced: Joseph Smith, Charles H. Spurgeon, Dwight L. Moody
Cross references: Numbers 6, Isaiah 1, Jeremiah 23, Mark 12:38, Luke 24, John 16:7-9, Romans 3:23, Romans 12:1, 1 Corinthians 1:27, 1 Corinthians 6:19, Galatians 3:27, Colossians 3:12, Hebrews 4:14-16, Hebrews 6:20, Hebrews 13:15, 1 Peter 2:9

Topic: priesthood

Keywords: priest, holy, sacrifice, Aaron, Moses, consecrate

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 1-9 Review
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2415

MESSAGE SUMMARY
The book of Leviticus is the instruction book for the priests, the Levites. In Leviticus 1-9, we learn the need for a sacrifice and the need for a priest. We discover how God's instructions in Leviticus point to Jesus Christ. There must be a sacrifice in order for atonement to take place and we need a priest to represent us before God. In the New Covenant, Jesus is our High Priest and we Christians are a royal priesthood. Through Jesus, we can go to God on our own behalf and on behalf of others.

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Climb of Mount Sinai
      1. Long, arduous climb
      2. Story, husband and wife "We should travel to Israel...recite the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai...stay home and obey them"
    2. Imagine the children of Israel camped around Mount Sinai and Moses climbing to the top
      1. They were camped there for one entire year
        1. Received two things
          1. Law of God
          2. Blueprints for the Tabernacle
      2. Book of Leviticus begins and ends in the same place
      3. Leviticus is not the easiest book to read
        1. It was never designed to get that excited about
        2. Exciting for the priests who would know how to do their job
        3. In ancient times the Jewish people would teach children, beginning in the book of Leviticus; Midrash, "Children are pure...occupy themselves with pure things"
        4. Remind ourselves when reading Scriptures like Leviticus of what Paul said to Timothy (see 2 Timothy 3:16-17)
          1. Paul amplified this when he wrote to the Romans (see Romans 15:4)
          2. Loftiest passages in the Bible are found in the book of Leviticus (see Leviticus 19:18)
  2. Leviticus: How to approach God—The way to God through sacrifice
    1. Celebrating the sacrifice of Christ tonight in the elements—the bread and the fruit of the vine
      1. Jesus said we needed to do this in remembrance of Him (see Luke 22:19 and 1 Corinthians 11:23-25)
      2. Look back to the sacrifice
      3. Look back to Leviticus to when the cross was even suggested
    2. People have a problem with sacrifice – bloody religion
      1. Don't understand it
      2. Why does anybody have to die?
      3. Your best, try hard
      4. God's standard
      5. Your goodness is not good enough
    3. The need of sacrifice
      1. Genesis, God made the first sacrifice – killed animals to provide covering for Adam and Eve
      2. In the New Covenant, God made the last sacrifice by send Jesus to the cross to die for us
    4. Holiness is one of the sub-themes of Leviticus
      1. Holiness leads to happiness
      2. Fulfilled life (see John 10:10)
      3. Holy, different, set apart
      4. Wholly, complete, fills you up
      5. Do we see ourselves as being different from the world in a good way (not weird)
        1. Causes them to want what you have
        2. Living a salty life
        3. Quote by Peggy Newnan "...bland guys in grey suites...they are the true rebels and with a cause"
        4. Rebelling against the values and standards of this world, following the Kingdom of God
    5. Blood is prominent in this book, why
      1. Shows us the awfulness of sin—it destroys life
      2. Shows us the gracious nature of God—"shall be forgiven" (see Leviticus 4:20, Leviticus 4:26, and Leviticus 6:7)
  3. Leviticus 1-7, we need a sacrifice; Leviticus 8-10, we need a priest
    1. 5 sacrifices form the center of worship for the Israelites at that time
      1. Burnt offering – consecration of myself completely to God (see Romans 12:1)
      2. Grain – dedication of my service to God
      3. Peace – celebration of my salvation
      4. First three: voluntary, last two: compulsory
      5. Sin – propitiation of my sin
      6. Trespass – restitution of the sinner
    2. We need a priest, chapters 8-10
      1. Priest – mediator between the people and God
      2. This was their book, consult the book
        1. That's how we live – consult the book
        2. Business environment
        3. Selecting a mate to please the Lord
      3. Christ is both the sacrifice and the priest
      4. In the New Testament Priesthood fulfilled in two ways
        1. Generally we fulfill the priesthood (see 1 Peter 2:9)
          1. Come boldly before God
          2. Represent others before God
        2. Specifically
          1. Jesus fulfills the role of the great High Priest
          2. You can't understand the book of Hebrews unless you understand Leviticus
          3. "We always study Hebrews and Leviticus together"— G. Campbell Morgan
          4. "For the law having a shadow..." Hebrews 10:1-3
            1. Law of Leviticus designed to be temporary
            2. iPad, computer—gadget outdated already
            3. Hunger for the next generation gadget
      5. Leviticus loses its punch
        1. Jesus Christ fulfilled it all (see Hebrews 10:4-13)
        2. Jesus sat down
        3. Once for all
        4. There's no more sacrifice to offer – it's done
        5. We look back to the cross—it's done, it's finished
  4. Closing – ask Jesus to be your Lord and Savior, take Communion

Publications referenced: Midrash
Figures referenced: G. Campbell Morgan
Cross references: Luke 22:19, Romans 12:1, Romans 15:4, 1 Corinthians 11:23-25, 2 Timothy 3:16-17, 1 Peter 2:9

Topic: Communion

Keywords: Leviticus, sacrifice, Communion

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 10-11:23
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 10-11:23
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2413

MESSAGE SUMMARY
God is concerned for the details of our worship, our health, and our very lives. As demonstrated through the profane fire of Nadab and Abihu, our worship must be based on sacrifice. And, the dietary restrictions show us God wants us to be good stewards of our bodies. As we consider our text, let's remember that while we are no longer under the Law, there are principles here that, when applied, lead to an acceptable worship of God and a powerful witness to the world.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 11-13
"For I am the LORD who brings you up out of the land of Egypt, to be your
God. You shall therefore be holy, for I am holy" (Leviticus 11:45).

PREVIEW: In Leviticus 11-13, the children of Israel are told what animals
they can and cannot eat, what to do after a child is born, and given laws
concerning leprosy. All these were written for our learning (see Romans
15:4) and we will discover lessons from these instructions.

Leviticus Outline:
Foods Permitted and Forbidden - Read Leviticus 11:1-23Unclean Animals - Read Leviticus 11:24-47
The Ritual After Childbirth - Read Leviticus 12:1-8
The Law Concerning Leprosy - Read Leviticus 13:1-46
The Law Concerning Leprous Garments - Read Leviticus 13:47-59

Foods Permitted and Forbidden - Read Leviticus 11:1-
23
1. God instructed his children regarding the animals that they were
allowed to eat. Describe the two required characteristics of the
animals they were permitted to consume (vv. 1-3).




2. There were two requirements an animal must meet before it could
be consumed. List the animals that met only one of the
requirements (vv. 4-8).




3. The Hebrew word for chewing the cud is essentially the same word
translated “meditation.” Jesus has made us clean (1 John 1:7).
Upon what are we to chew, or meditate? (See Psalm 1:1-3, 119:15,
and 97-99, and Joshua 1:8.)




4. Animals that had cloven hooves were distinct in the visible
appearance of their divided hoof; it marked their walk. How should
our walk be visibly distinct from the world? (See Philippians 1:27,
Ephesians 4:1, Colossians 1:10, and 1 Thessalonians 2:11-12.)




5. Two characteristics are given of things in the water that may be
eaten. What are they (vv. 9-12)?




6. God lists creatures from among the birds that were to be considered
unclean (vv. 13-19). What word is used twice to describe the
unclean birds that were not to be eaten?




7. What distinction is made of insects that caused them to be labeled
as an abomination (v. 20)?




8. What distinction is made of insects that caused them to be labeled
as an edible (v. 21)?




Unclean Animals - Read Leviticus 11:24-47
9. The concept of being unclean till evening not only prohibited
participation in worship but also restricted movement within
society. What action(s) caused a person to become unclean (vv. 24-
28)?




10. That which is clean (pure) cannot make that which is unclean
(impure) clean. The unclean always makes the clean unclean and
not vice versa. Jesus made us clean (John 13:7-11, 15:3, and 1 John
1:7). What actions might defile us, making us unclean? (See
Matthew 15:11, Ephesians 5:7-12, and 2 Corinthians 6:14-18.)




11. Creeping things that defiled a person are listed (vv. 29-30). In what
two ways might these creeping things defile a person or an object
(vv.31-32)?




12. How did an object that was defiled by a creeping thing become
clean (v. 32)?




13. What was to be done with earthen vessels that became unclean (vv.
33-35)?




14. Because we are referred to as earthen vessels (2 Corinthians 4:7),
God in His love must break us when there is uncleanness found in
us—not to punish us, for Christ bore all of our punishment on the
Cross—but to purify us. How might God “break” us? (See Proverbs
3:11-12, Hebrews 12:5-8, and Revelation 3:19.)




15. An exception is listed that allows an object to remain clean if
touched by a carcass of a creeping thing. What is that exception (v.
36)?




16. The children of God were not to make themselves “abominable,”
“unclean,” and “defiled” by creeping things (v. 43). Rather, what
were they to do unto themselves (vv. 44-45)?




17. How are we to do the same unto ourselves? (See Matthew 5:48, 1
Thessalonians 4:7, and 1 Peter 1:15-16.)




The Ritual After Childbirth - Read Leviticus 12:1-8
18. How long was a woman unclean after having a male child (v. 2)?
How long was she to remain in purification (v. 4)?




19. When was the male child to be circumcised (v. 3)?




20. How long was a woman unclean after having a female child? How
long was she to remain in purification (v. 5)?




21. What was the woman to do when the days of her purification were
over (v. 6)?




22. If the woman was not able to afford the prescribed offering for her
purification, what alternative, more financially affordable options
were made available (v. 8)?




23. Which option did Mary take after having Jesus (Luke 2:22-24)?




The Law Concerning Leprosy - Read Leviticus 13:1-46
24. If a person had a swelling, a scab, or a bright spot, where was he to
be taken (v. 2)?




25. What evidence was to be looked for to determine if the person was
to be pronounced unclean (v. 3)?




26. If the person was examined and found clean, what was the process
the person experienced to ensure they were indeed clean (vv. 4-6)?




27. How would the priest determine if the person’s scab was indeed
leprosy (vv. 7-8)?




28. The Hebrew word used for leprosy is saraath. It refers to disfiguring
skin diseases, including leprosy (Hansen's disease). Leprosy was and
still is an incurable disease, although medication can arrest the
development of it. Types or models are often used throughout
Scripture to illustrate points. In the Bible, leprosy is a type of sin:
loathsome, spreading, and incurable, gradually rotting away the
flesh, slowly deadening the nerve endings, and eventually leading
to death (see Isaiah 1:5-6). The rabbis strongly believed that leprosy
was a direct judgment from God. In fact, the word leprosy means
“smitten.” Lepers were excluded from the community and were
required to cry out as others approached them. What were they
required to cry out? (See Leviticus 13:45-46).




29. If the priest examined a person who obviously had leprosy all over
the skin, in what instance could the priest pronounce him clean (vv.
12-13)




30. What was the indicator to the priest that the person was still
unclean, although he was obviously covered in leprosy (vv. 14-16)?




31. If a person had some type of other skin issue, such as a boil, burn or
a scale (vv. 18-37) and it continued to spread, it would result in the
person being pronounced unclean. Since leprosy is a type of sin in
the Bible, how might we recognize an unrepentant sin in a person’s
life? (See 1 John 3:6,9, 2:4, 4:8, 5:18, and 2 Peter 2:22.)




32. How long was a person unclean once he was initially pronounced
unclean because of leprosy (v. 46)?




The Law Concerning Leprous Garments - Read
Leviticus 13:47-59
33. What was done to a garment that was found to contain active
leprosy (vv. 47-52)?




34. How could a garment that contained a leprous plague be
pronounced clean (vv. 53-58)?




35. Read Matthew 8:1-4. What did the leper do to become clean from
his leprosy? How is that a picture of what all sinners need to do to
be pronounced clean from their sin (leprosy)? (See also 1 John 1:8-
10.)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Chapter 8: The basis for the priesthood – blood sacrifice
    2. Chapter 9: The beginning of the priesthood – robes, anointing, sprinkling
    3. Chapter 10: the breakdown of the priesthood
      1. The two sons of Aaron
      2. The first day on the job
      3. They don't make it out alive
    4. The Bible does not hide the flaws of its heroes
      1. Yousuf Karsh photographer – 8x10 film – detailed
      2. Abraham, Jacob, King David
  2. Nadab and Abihu, the sons of Aaron
    1. Offered profane fire
      1. Different translations say: strange fire, unconsecrated fire, a different kind of fire
      2. Think it was: fire not from holy fire—didn't follow God's directions
        1. If you serve the Lord, don't be lazy
        2. Don't just put something together and throw it out there
        3. "The man who finds the ministry an easy life will also find that it will bring a hard death."—Charles Spurgeon
        4. What's the big deal? Your approach, your worship must be based on sacrifice
      3. Some believe they were drunk
      4. Does God still do things like that today?
        1. At new beginnings
        2. At the beginning of the monarchy (see 2 Samuel 6)
        3. At the inauguration of Christianity (see Acts 5)
        4. Addendum: Thank God He doesn't act like this today
        5. People in the church at Corinth
    2. Aaron aghast, in shock
      1. Two remaining sons and Aaron were not to mourn outwardly
      2. The anointing oil is upon them
      3. Would send a message to Israel contradictory to the message God was sending
    3. Priests were not to drink
      1. Logic: You need to think clearly
      2. Alcohol gives people a false sense of security and joy
      3. The Lord would love to give you a real sense of joy and security
      4. Bible contrasts two experiences "Do not be drunk with wine" (Ephesians 5:18)
      5. Get a real high—Walk with the Lord and be obedient to Him
      6. A lot of times people will mistake physical excitement with a spiritual movement
      7. Who lights your fire?
        1. Worship leader
        2. So excited about the sacrifice of Jesus Christ—that excites me!
    4. Heave offering and Wave offering
      1. Heave – up and down – show my dependence on God
      2. Wave – right and left – God is present among His people
    5. Two remaining sons of Aaron didn't eat the portion in the Holy Place
      1. Their brothers just died
      2. Probably lost their appetite
      3. Aaron explains
      4. Corollary: "Unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man" (John 6:53); crimson twine of redemption
  3. Review
    1. Leviticus 1-7, we need a sacrifice
    2. Leviticus 8-10, we need a priest
      1. Fulfillment of that is Jesus Christ our great high Priest
      2. You need to understand this book to understand the book of Hebrews (see Hebrews 4:14-16)
  4. Chapter 11, focus on the people
    1. Previous chapters: Offerings for God – This chapter: food for the people
    2. Previous chapters: Worship of God – This chapter: walk in the world
    3. Sacred vs. Secular
      1. False dichotomy
      2. "Reverend Skip"
      3. God wants to be Lord of all your life
    4. God gives the people a diet
      1. Shows that God wants to be in all the details of all your life
        1. Take care of your body (see 1 Corinthians 6:19-20)
        2. Serve the Lord with a quality of life, be a good steward of your body
        3. He's concerned about our health
      2. List of foods not to eat
        1. Camel, no interest
        2. Dealing with kosher law
        3. Kosher: constant reminder that Israel lived in a world where choices had to be made
        4. Corollary: chewing of the cud—"And in His law he meditates day and night" (Psalm 1:2)
          1. Meditate – read parts of Scripture over and over again
          2. Pulling out parts and going deeper and deeper
      3. Food from the water
        1. Israel has water all around
        2. Fish gate (see Nehemiah 3)
        3. Fish with scales and fins you can eat it
      4. China, food "What is that?"
      5. Philippines burger, tasted weird – worm burger
      6. Insects, if they leap you can eat them
        1. As a toddler, Nate put a cockroach in his mouth
        2. Don't eat the creeping insects
        3. No chocolate covered ants
        4. You could eat chocolate covered grasshoppers
        5. John the Baptist ate locusts
          1. Did he eat bugs?
          2. Possibly ate from the locust tree (carob)
        6. Story: Missionary saw woman pounding the earth, then suck up ants
  5. Closing
    1. Don't want to rush it, good principles coming up
    2. How do you know what is right and what is wrong?
      1. God is the creator, He gets to make the rules
      2. We live in a time where man does what is right in his own eyes
      3. If you break the rules, there are consequences
      4. We're not under the Law any more
      5. It's best to say, "I'm going to know God and I make a living commitment to Him. I'm going to trust Him."

 Figures referenced: Yousuf Karsh, Charles H. Spurgeon

Cross references: 2 Samuel 6, Nehemiah 3, Psalm 1, John 6:53, Acts 5, 1 Corinthians 6:19-20, Ephesians 5:18-19

Topic: Diet

Keywords: food, priest, Nadab, Abihu,

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 11:24-13:59
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 11:24-13:59
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2422

MESSAGE SUMMARY
God instructed the children of Israel about what they could and could not eat, how a woman was to be purified after childbirth, and how to deal with diseases of the skin. As we consider this text in Leviticus, we discover that God is concerned about every detail of our lives as well. He wants to have a daily personal relationship with us, and He wants us to be holy and set apart for Him—separate from the world.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 11-13
"For I am the LORD who brings you up out of the land of Egypt, to be your
God. You shall therefore be holy, for I am holy" (Leviticus 11:45).

PREVIEW: In Leviticus 11-13, the children of Israel are told what animals
they can and cannot eat, what to do after a child is born, and given laws
concerning leprosy. All these were written for our learning (see Romans
15:4) and we will discover lessons from these instructions.

Leviticus Outline:
Foods Permitted and Forbidden - Read Leviticus 11:1-23Unclean Animals - Read Leviticus 11:24-47
The Ritual After Childbirth - Read Leviticus 12:1-8
The Law Concerning Leprosy - Read Leviticus 13:1-46
The Law Concerning Leprous Garments - Read Leviticus 13:47-59

Foods Permitted and Forbidden - Read Leviticus 11:1-
23
1. God instructed his children regarding the animals that they were
allowed to eat. Describe the two required characteristics of the
animals they were permitted to consume (vv. 1-3).




2. There were two requirements an animal must meet before it could
be consumed. List the animals that met only one of the
requirements (vv. 4-8).




3. The Hebrew word for chewing the cud is essentially the same word
translated “meditation.” Jesus has made us clean (1 John 1:7).
Upon what are we to chew, or meditate? (See Psalm 1:1-3, 119:15,
and 97-99, and Joshua 1:8.)




4. Animals that had cloven hooves were distinct in the visible
appearance of their divided hoof; it marked their walk. How should
our walk be visibly distinct from the world? (See Philippians 1:27,
Ephesians 4:1, Colossians 1:10, and 1 Thessalonians 2:11-12.)




5. Two characteristics are given of things in the water that may be
eaten. What are they (vv. 9-12)?




6. God lists creatures from among the birds that were to be considered
unclean (vv. 13-19). What word is used twice to describe the
unclean birds that were not to be eaten?




7. What distinction is made of insects that caused them to be labeled
as an abomination (v. 20)?




8. What distinction is made of insects that caused them to be labeled
as an edible (v. 21)?




Unclean Animals - Read Leviticus 11:24-47
9. The concept of being unclean till evening not only prohibited
participation in worship but also restricted movement within
society. What action(s) caused a person to become unclean (vv. 24-
28)?




10. That which is clean (pure) cannot make that which is unclean
(impure) clean. The unclean always makes the clean unclean and
not vice versa. Jesus made us clean (John 13:7-11, 15:3, and 1 John
1:7). What actions might defile us, making us unclean? (See
Matthew 15:11, Ephesians 5:7-12, and 2 Corinthians 6:14-18.)




11. Creeping things that defiled a person are listed (vv. 29-30). In what
two ways might these creeping things defile a person or an object
(vv.31-32)?




12. How did an object that was defiled by a creeping thing become
clean (v. 32)?




13. What was to be done with earthen vessels that became unclean (vv.
33-35)?




14. Because we are referred to as earthen vessels (2 Corinthians 4:7),
God in His love must break us when there is uncleanness found in
us—not to punish us, for Christ bore all of our punishment on the
Cross—but to purify us. How might God “break” us? (See Proverbs
3:11-12, Hebrews 12:5-8, and Revelation 3:19.)




15. An exception is listed that allows an object to remain clean if
touched by a carcass of a creeping thing. What is that exception (v.
36)?




16. The children of God were not to make themselves “abominable,”
“unclean,” and “defiled” by creeping things (v. 43). Rather, what
were they to do unto themselves (vv. 44-45)?




17. How are we to do the same unto ourselves? (See Matthew 5:48, 1
Thessalonians 4:7, and 1 Peter 1:15-16.)




The Ritual After Childbirth - Read Leviticus 12:1-8
18. How long was a woman unclean after having a male child (v. 2)?
How long was she to remain in purification (v. 4)?




19. When was the male child to be circumcised (v. 3)?




20. How long was a woman unclean after having a female child? How
long was she to remain in purification (v. 5)?




21. What was the woman to do when the days of her purification were
over (v. 6)?




22. If the woman was not able to afford the prescribed offering for her
purification, what alternative, more financially affordable options
were made available (v. 8)?




23. Which option did Mary take after having Jesus (Luke 2:22-24)?




The Law Concerning Leprosy - Read Leviticus 13:1-46
24. If a person had a swelling, a scab, or a bright spot, where was he to
be taken (v. 2)?




25. What evidence was to be looked for to determine if the person was
to be pronounced unclean (v. 3)?




26. If the person was examined and found clean, what was the process
the person experienced to ensure they were indeed clean (vv. 4-6)?




27. How would the priest determine if the person’s scab was indeed
leprosy (vv. 7-8)?




28. The Hebrew word used for leprosy is saraath. It refers to disfiguring
skin diseases, including leprosy (Hansen's disease). Leprosy was and
still is an incurable disease, although medication can arrest the
development of it. Types or models are often used throughout
Scripture to illustrate points. In the Bible, leprosy is a type of sin:
loathsome, spreading, and incurable, gradually rotting away the
flesh, slowly deadening the nerve endings, and eventually leading
to death (see Isaiah 1:5-6). The rabbis strongly believed that leprosy
was a direct judgment from God. In fact, the word leprosy means
“smitten.” Lepers were excluded from the community and were
required to cry out as others approached them. What were they
required to cry out? (See Leviticus 13:45-46).




29. If the priest examined a person who obviously had leprosy all over
the skin, in what instance could the priest pronounce him clean (vv.
12-13)




30. What was the indicator to the priest that the person was still
unclean, although he was obviously covered in leprosy (vv. 14-16)?




31. If a person had some type of other skin issue, such as a boil, burn or
a scale (vv. 18-37) and it continued to spread, it would result in the
person being pronounced unclean. Since leprosy is a type of sin in
the Bible, how might we recognize an unrepentant sin in a person’s
life? (See 1 John 3:6,9, 2:4, 4:8, 5:18, and 2 Peter 2:22.)




32. How long was a person unclean once he was initially pronounced
unclean because of leprosy (v. 46)?




The Law Concerning Leprous Garments - Read
Leviticus 13:47-59
33. What was done to a garment that was found to contain active
leprosy (vv. 47-52)?




34. How could a garment that contained a leprous plague be
pronounced clean (vv. 53-58)?




35. Read Matthew 8:1-4. What did the leper do to become clean from
his leprosy? How is that a picture of what all sinners need to do to
be pronounced clean from their sin (leprosy)? (See also 1 John 1:8-
10.)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction – Walking with the Lord
    1. What we do here, now; on earth, with people
      1. "It's not how high you jump, it's how straight you walk when you hit the ground"
      2. Who you really are is evidenced by how you live
      3. In this text, it's about physicality; our bodies are the focus
      4. Story: Man came to evangelist, "I don't want to read the tract, I want to watch your tracks"
    2. God gave menu: Here's what you can eat; here is what you cannot eat
      1. Why would God care about giving us an intricate menu?
      2. God wants to be a part of every single detail of our lives
      3. "Pray without ceasing" 1 Thessalonians 5:17
      4. Story: Ritual – morning, spend time in the Bible, then spend time at the beach
    3. Chapter 11 emphasis: what's placed in the body (what you eat), and what's place on the body (what you touch)
    4. Chapter 12 emphasis: what's produced by the body (children)
    5. Chapter 13 emphasis: what's produced upon the body (sores, blemishes, discharges)
  2. Leviticus 11:24-47
    1. Concept: defilement by contact
      1. Can't become holy by touching something holy
      2. Holiness doesn't come by contact, but sin does
      3. Example: gallon of water
      4. Example: sick child
      5. Principle: Don't mess with being contaminated with sinful things; watch what you come in contact with lest you become defiled
    2. Reasons for dietary restrictions
      1. Separation, to be set apart from other nations, v. 45
        1. Very important
        2. Common refrain
          1. Repeated another eight times in the book of Leviticus
          2. Repeated another 60 times in 18 old testament books
        3. Personal holiness flows out from personal relationship
      2. Sanitation, God wanted them to live healthy lives, vv. 46-47
        1. No FDA
        2. Only God
        3. Bacteria, e-coli
        4. Kosher law was given for health purposes
        5. Story: trip to India, Egypt, Greece, Israel
      3. Dr. S.H. Kellogg, who studied Jewish law, said, "One of the greatest discoveries of modern science is the fact that a large number of diseases to which animals are liable are due to the presence of low forms of parasitic life. To such diseases those which are unclean in their feeding will be especially exposed…(showed how diseases can be communicated from animals to man)…long ago, in the days when the plague was desolating Europe, the Jews universally escaped infection, which in turn brought suspicion—the other peoples' thinking that the Jews were poisoning the wells and the springs."
      4. We are New Testament believers
        1. Not under the dietary restrictions of the Law
        2. Eat a camel, lizard—you are welcome to eat anything—nothing is unclean (see Romans 14:14, 1 Corinthians 10:31)
        3. Compare this Scripture in Leviticus with Acts 10 – Peter staying with a friend in Joppa
          1. Peter knew what was unkosher
          2. He wouldn't dare touch what was unkosher
          3. Yet God, the author of Leviticus, was speaking to him
          4. Important lesson: It's not by what you eat or don't eat
  3. Leviticus 12, We are born needy and helpless
    1. We are sinners by birth (see Psalm 51)
      1. Job said, "How can a man be clean who is born woman?" (see Job 25:4)
      2. The Bible consigns all mankind from birth as sinners
      3. Sin comes naturally to a child
      4. Paul said that we are by nature children of wrath (see Ephesians 2:3)
      5. Modern psychology says we are born innocent and then a product of our culture
    2. Circumcision
      1. Came from all the way back, it pre-dated the law; covenant  with Abraham (see Genesis 17:9-14)
      2. What's up with the eighth day? Safest; blood clotting
      3. Circumcision practiced by other nations; God took an ancient custom and gave it spiritual significance
        1. Circumcision was God's mark of ownership upon the male children
        2. Covenants were often marked by signs—outward sign of the inward covenant
          1. Abraham: circumcision
          2. Noah: rainbow
          3. Moses: Sabbath day
          4. New Testament: baptism
          5. Wedding ring: vow with wife
      4. The ritual became a substitute for the reality
        1. Should have meant they were to cut away evil from their lives
        2. They thought, "If I've gone through the ritual, that's all I need"
        3. Same today, "If I get baptized, I'll go to heaven"
        4. "Circumcise the foreskin of your hearts" (Deuteronomy 10:16)
    3. Woman's period of purification
      1. Why was a woman considered "ceremonially" unclean?
        1. In having a baby, you've brought another sinner into the world
        2. In today's culture, this is politically incorrect
        3. "the depravity of man" – every single person is born a sinner and needs redemption
        4. Report from Minnesota Crime Commission said, "Every baby, if left unchecked, would become a murderer, a thief, and a rapist"
        5. I'm a sinner not because I sin, I sin because I'm a sinner. Is it a dog because it barks? Dogs bark because that is their nature; I sin because I have a sin nature
      2. The sacrifice
        1. Lamb or two birds
          1. Financially accessible for everyone
          2. God made atonement available for everyone—rich or poor
            1. God makes salvation and redemption accessible (see Isaiah 55:1)
            2. Free of charge
            3. Easy – just believe and confess (see Romans 10:9)
        2. Luke 2 – the Christmas story
          1. Joseph and Mary brought two birds
            1. Were too poor and couldn't bring a lamb
            2. Shows how low God stooped when He brought Jesus into the world
            3. Though He was rich, he became poor (see 2 Corinthians 8:9)
          2. Yet, they also brought a lamb, didn't they?
          3. Side note: If Mary were sinless, she wouldn't have needed to bring a sin offering and she wouldn't have needed a Savior (see Luke 1:47)
  4. Leviticus 13 – Leprosy
    1. Could speak to a number of skin conditions
      1. The Priest acted as the clinician/doctor
      2. Person with the skin condition was isolated depending on the condition as outlined in the law
      3. If pronounced leprous, there were some very stiff ramifications, including being ostracized by the community
    2. There's two basic kinds of leprosy
      1. Everything that is a skin problem – you don't know what it could turn into
      2. Elephantiasis, called living death
        1. Numbing and distortion of the limbs
        2. Mycobacterium leprae
        3. Starts small and spreads
        4. Lose sensation in the limbs
        5. William Barkley describes it as, "It might begin with little nodules which go on to ulcerate. The ulcers develop a foul discharge. The eyebrows fall out. The eyes become staring. The vocal chords become ulcerated. The voice becomes hoarse. The breath wheezes. The hands and the feet always ulcerate. Slowly the sufferer becomes a mass of ulcerated growths. The average course of that kind of leprosy is nine years, and it ends in mental decay, coma, and ultimately death. Leprosy might begin with the loss of all sensation in some part of the body. The nerve trunks are affected. The muscles waste away. The tendons contract until the hands are like claws. There follows ulcerations of the hands and feet. Then comes the progressive loss of fingers and toes until in the end the whole hand or the whole foot may drop off. The duration of that kind of leprosy is anywhere from twenty to thirty years. It is a kind of terrible, progressive death in which a man dies by inches."
      3. Imagine "sweating it out" that week of isolation
    3. Principle: Every form of weakness that you and I have, needs to be watched
      1. There are hundreds of things that there may be nothing wrong with
      2. But you may get into areas that are unhealthy for you
    4. Social implications of being unclean
      1. Thousands of years ago in the synagogue, a separating wall between the men and women – special separation in the back for lepers – no contact at all
      2. In the Gospels, a man with leprosy comes to Jesus and Jesus touches him (see Mark 1:39-41)
        1. This is one instance when something clean makes something unclean clean
        2. Imagine how that man felt to be touched, he probably hadn't been touched in years
    5. Sin is a type of leprosy; leprosy is a perfect example of how sin works
      1. So small, no big deal, it's just a little spot
      2. Spreads quickly, highly contagious, you had to be separated (see James 1:13-15)
      3. Affects deeply, problem is systemic, it's beneath the skin, sin is a problem of the heart
        1. Story: in 18th century England they would cut off your hand for stealing
        2. Problem isn't his teeth or hands, it's his heart
        3. It's from the heart that evil comes (see Mark 7:20-22)
      4. Ruins extensively
        1. Physically ravaged
        2. Emotionally ostracized
      5. Destroys sensitivity, nerves so ruined that you can't feel
      6. It ends in death, it will take your life
        1. Incurable apart from a miraculous touch from God
        2. There's the hope!
        3. The law of the leper in chapter 14
        4. We see that law enacted in the New Testament when Jesus heals the leper
        5. Sin is incurable, we require a touch from God
  5. Closing – a spiritual leper
    1. You can be clean
    2. If you are willing, He is willing
    3. Are you willing?

 

Publications referenced: Minnesota Crime Commission report

Figures referenced: Dr. S.H. Kellogg

Cross references: Genesis 17:9-14, Deuteronomy 10:16, Job 25:4, Psalm 51, Isaiah 55:1, Mark 1:39-41, 7:20-22, Luke 1:47, 2, Acts 10, Romans 10:9, 14:14, 1 Corinthians 10:31, 2 Corinthians 8:9, Ephesians 2:3, 1 Thessalonians 5:17, James 1:13-15

Topic: law

Keywords: clean, unclean, leprosy, God, law, holy, holiness

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 14
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 14
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2423

MESSAGE SUMMARY
How do the Levitical laws for cleansing leprosy or a house with a plague apply to our lives? In this study, we learn that we are all infected with a virus—the sin virus. Like the lepers of the Old Testament, our means of becoming clean is blood. As we consider this text, we'll learn important symbolism that will help us discern not only physical but also spiritual cleanliness.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 14-15
PREVIEW: In Leviticus 14-15, the law for any leprous sore and scale, for the leprosy of a garment and of a house, and for one who has a discharge is given.

Leviticus Outline:
The Ritual for Cleansing Healed Lepers - Read Leviticus 14:1-32
The Law Concerning Leprous Houses - Read Leviticus 14:33-57
The Law Concerning Bodily Discharges - Read Leviticus 15:1-33

The Ritual for Cleansing Healed Lepers - Read Leviticus 14:1-32
1. Leprosy was and still is an incurable disease, although medication can arrest the development of it. Types or models are often used throughout Scripture to illustrate points. In the Bible, leprosy is a type of sin: loathsome, spreading, and incurable, gradually rotting away the flesh, slowly deadening the nerve endings, and eventually leading to death (see Isaiah 1:5-6). The rabbis strongly believed that leprosy was a direct judgment from God. In fact, the word leprosy means smitten. What record of healing from leprosy exists in the Old Testament? (See Exodus 4:6-8, Numbers 12, and 2 Kings 5:1-19.)





2. A leper who appears to have been cleansed of leprosy was to be brought to the priest (v. 2). Where did the priest go to have the leper brought to him (v. 3)? Why did he go there? (See Leviticus 13:45-46 and Numbers 5:1–4.)





3. What items did the priest command to be taken for the leper’s cleansing (v. 4)?





4. What was done with each of the birds used in the cleansing ritual for the healed leper (vv. 5-6)?






5. How many times was the blood of the bird that was killed over running water sprinkled on the healed leper (v. 7)? What was pronounced of the healed leper (v. 7)? Why was the blood sprinkled on the leper? (See Hebrews 9:13, 22.)






6. Once the healed leper was declared clean, what did he have to do to himself (vv. 8-9)?






7. The eighth day symbolizes the day of new beginnings. What did the cleansed leper take to the priest on the eighth day (v. 10)?





8. The priest offered one of the cleansed leper’s lambs as a trespass offering (v. 12). What did the priest do with some of the blood of the sacrificed lamb (v. 14)? What other substance did the priest use to perform the same actions (v. 17)? What did the priest do with the remainder of this substance (v. 18)?






9. If the cleansed leper could not afford to offer two lambs, what alternative was made available (vv. 21-22)?






The Law Concerning Leprous Houses - Read Leviticus 14:33-57
10. This law concerning leprous houses was given in advance of them entering the land of Canaan (v. 34). How did a house obtain a leprous plague (v. 34)? (See also Proverbs 3:33.)






11. A house which was believed to contain a leprous plague was to be emptied before the priest entered it (v. 36) so that its contents wouldn’t be declared unclean. What did the priest look for in order to determine if the house had a leprous plague (v. 37)?






12. If the priest determined that the house did indeed appear to have a leprous plague that was spreading, what did he command be done to the house (vv. 38-42)?





13. What became of a house in which the plague returned after being cleansed (vv. 43-45)?






14. If the house appears to have been cleansed of the leprous plague, what ritual was done to declare it clean (vv. 48-53)?






15. This chapter ends with an admonition that God’s people are to be able to determine themselves and to teach others what is clean and unclean as it relates to leprosy (vv. 54-57). How are we to deal with leprous (unclean, sinful, evil) things in our lives? (See Psalm 101:2-4, Psalms 141:4, 1 Thessalonians 4:7, 5:22, Ephesians 5:11, 2 Peter 1:3-4, Hebrews 12:1, Romans 12:1-2, and 1 John 3:3.)






The Law Concerning Bodily Discharges - Read Leviticus 15:1-33
16. Most commentators believed that the discharge being referred to was venereal disease. This discharge not only caused the person but everything he was in contact with to be unclean. Make a list of the items mentioned that became unclean because of the person with a discharge (vv. 4-12).





17. As you read through this section, notice how often the solution is for defilement is to wash with water. How are we to “wash with water”? (See Ephesians 5:26, John 15:3, 17:17, and Psalm 119:9.)






18. The one cleansed of his discharge was to wait seven days, bathe, wash his clothes, and then he could consider himself clean. Once he was clean, he could come to the tabernacle on the eighth day to offer his sacrifice and be atoned for (vv. 13-15). How have we been washed, which now allows us to approach God? (See Psalm 51:2, Acts 22:16, 1 Corinthians 6:11, Titus 3:5, and Hebrews 10:22.)






19. If a man has an emission of semen, or his semen touches a garment or his wife, what is to be done (vv. 16-18)?






20. The natural periodic flow of blood from a woman caused her and the things she lies or sits on to be unclean (v. 20). She was to be set apart for seven days (v. 19) because of this. Was sexual intercourse allowed during the woman’s time of blood flow (v. 24)? (See also Leviticus 18:19, and 20:18.)






21. What was not required if there was an emission of semen from a man or blood from a woman?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. I'm a leper, born that way
      1. Family was a colony of lepers
      2. All neighbors were part of that colony
      3. Entire town was filled with lepers
    2. Someone perfect came from heaven
      1. Now I look around and I think,"You're unclean"
      2. I look in the mirror and see that I am dirty
      3. He was the only clean one
      4. We didn't know how bad we were until we saw Him
    3. Leprosy portrayed sin in the Bible
      1. It was incurable, it was your death warrant unless there was a miraculous intervention
      2. It brought separation
      3. There was no cure, "I'm going to be destroyed"
    4. In New Testament, Jesus healed a leper
      1. "Don't tell anyone"
      2. Go to the priest
      3. Offer the things Moses commanded to be done
    5. Hebrew word: tsara’at
      1. Leprosy
      2. Skin diseases
      3. Most fatal form: Myco bacterium leprae
  2. Law for leper on day of cleansing
    1. Symbolism behind birds
      1. Dead bird – what happens to the leper
      2. Living bird – a do-over
      3. Hyssop, scarlet thread, and cedar wood
    2. The priest goes out to the leper to inspect
      1. Leper confined
      2. Priest will pronounce him clean
    3. Lesser diseases would run their course and the priest would pronounce them cleaned/healed
    4. Hansen's disease – no known cure
      1. Provision in the law that we never hear of except in the New Testament
      2. One exception: Naaman (see 2Kings 5), wash in Jordan river
      3. Jesus healed on many occasions those with leprosy
    5. The priest goes outside the camp
      1. Away from the presence of the Lord, the tabernacle of the Lord
      2. Jesus did that in a greater way: He left heaven and came to earth, where everyone has the S-I-N virus
      3. God came down to us (see Psalm 8:5 and Hebrews 2:7)
    6. Cleansed leper, washes, sacrifices, shaves all the hair, seven days does it all again
      1. Paul alludes to a person's hairis symbolic (see 1 Corinthians 11)
      2. Woman's glory
      3. Man – a sign of maturity
      4. Back then it was all-important; shame/shave (see 2 Samuel 10)
      5. Perhaps to give person appearance of a new-born baby
      6. As Christians, we still walk in this world and our feet get dirty
        1. We, believers, need to be continually be cleansed (see John 13:10)
        2. Confess sins (see 1 John 1:9)
        3. Story: small town, Pastor/Barber Bill and his wife Grace; shaved by grace
        4. Once you're saved, you don't need to be saved again, but you do need to be shaved again
      7. vv. 11-20  form one long sentence describing the cleansing ceremony – the priest makes him clean; Who's the Priest who makes us clean?
    7. Two birds are symbolic
      1. One killed, one filled heavenward
      2. Death and resurrection of Christ
      3. Flew upward with blood on him
      4. Jesus, our great high priest, ascended with the blood of the covenant (see Hebrews 4:14)
      5. Jesus presents us faultless to God – exceeding joy (see Jude 1:24)
    8. Blood on ear, thumb, toe – what I hear, what I do, where I walk
    9. Oil and blood sprinkled
      1. Oil is often a symbol of the Holy Spirit
      2. The Spirit can only be applied where the blood has been applied – cleansing must take place
        1. "The anointing" "Filled"
        2. First need to be cleansed of sin
      3. Oil that is left is poured on the leper's head
        1. Only four groups of people were anointed
          1. Kings
          2. Prophets
          3. Priests
          4. (Jesus fulfills the role of these three)
          5. Lepers are the fourth group to be anointed
        2. Anoint means "to smear"
        3. You are royalty, you were once lepers – He cleansed you and put you in the category with Jesus
    10. If you're poor, one lamb was always essential
    11. Leper wakes up hopeless every day
      1. After cleansing must have felt so happy
      2. "Born again"
  3. Cleansing of a house with a plague
    1. Anticipating the day when they are going to live in a house, not a tent
    2. Plague: mold, mildew, or fungus
    3. Renovate or tear it down
    4. Two birds (same as for person)
    5. To teach
      1. Get this lesson – these are to give a lesson
      2. This is the law of leprosy –discern what is clean and unclean
  4. Closing - We are the temple of the Holy Spirit
    1. One activity, worship takes place
    2. Make sure there's a certain standard/integrity in our own lives (see Ephesians 3:17)
    3. Jesus to live, settle down, and make at home in you (see Revelation 3:20)
    4. Does He feel at home in you? Or are there areas, little places that you keep from the Lord
      1. Music
      2. Movies
      3. We need to know and teach the difference between what is clean and unclean
    5. Booklet My Heart, Christ's Home by Robert Boyd Munger
      1. Invited Jesus into my heart
      2. He turned on the light and lit a fire
      3. Music and harmony
      4. Filled the emptiness
      5. "I want You to settle down and use it as Your own"
      6. Library
      7. I was now uncomfortable with some of the things in the room
      8. Help me clean it up – of course, throw out (like taking the stones outside the city)
      9. Portrait of Himself
      10. Bring thoughts under control
      11. Waiting for me at the front door, "odor in the house…"
      12. I don't have the strength to clean it out
      13. Authorize Christ to handle that closet
    6. Give him the key to every part of your life
    7. Our lives are not compartments, God wants to be the hub of our lives

Hebrew terms: צָרַע; tsara, to be struck with leprosy, to be leprous

Publications referenced: My Heart, Christ's Home by Robert Boyd Munger

Cross references: 2 Samuel 10, 2 Kings 5, Psalm8:5, John 13:10, 1 Corinthians 11, Ephesians 3:17, Hebrews 2:7, 4:14, 1 John1:9, Jude 1:24, Revelation 3:20

Topic: Cleansing

Keywords: leprosy, clean, unclean, cleansing, law

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 15-16:6
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 15-16:6
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2434

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Although the book of Leviticus may not seem exciting or relevant to our lives today, we need to remember that all Scripture is given by inspiration of God and is profitable for our instruction (see 2 Timothy 3:16). God is not just concerned about the outward, but the inward life—those secret things that may defile us and His church. As we consider this text, we learn that our private sin affects not only us, but everyone.

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Some chapters of the Bible are a blast to teach
      1. Resurrection
      2. Sacrifice of Christ
      3. Isaiah 53
      4. John 3
      5. Psalm 23
      6. Genesis 22
    2. Other chapters that you'd rather avoid—we're in one
      1. Discharge from the body
      2. Yuck!
      3. Yet here we are
    3. Expository Church
      1. Chapter by chapter
      2. Verse by verse
      3. The text navigates the truth
      4. Whatever is on God's heart
    4. Refresh on why we are studying this book, this chapter
      1. All Scripture is given by inspiration of God and is profitable (see 2 Timothy 3:16)
      2. All of Leviticus is profitable
        1. Studying Leviticus will unlock other books of the Scripture
        2. This book unveils the presence of God in every aspect of life
        3. Undo stale patterns of worship
        4. Underscore the holiness of God
          1. Key theme

          2. Hebrew word haqqodes, unique separate, the holy

    5. Review of what we've studied so far
      1. Leviticus takes place in one geographic location—foot of Mount Sanai
      2. First ten chapters are about worship of God (vertical)
      3. Now chapters 11-15 are about our walk in the world—relationship to other people (horizontal)
      4. First seven chapters all about sacrifice/offerings
        1. Burnt
        2. Grain
        3. Peace
        4. Sin
        5. Trespass
        6. Confronted with the principle: I need a sacrifice
      5. Chapters 8-10; principle: I need a priest, someone to represent me before God
      6. Chapters 11-15--dealing with the horizontal
        1. What foods you can eat, chapter 11
        2. What is produced by my body—children
        3. Now chapter 15, the "Yuck!" chapter
      7. Leprosy is obvious, everybody will know about it
      8. Bodily discharge chapter, this one is private
        1. God wants to be part of that too
        2. We all have a public and private life
        3. David prayed for the Lord to cleanse him from secret fault (see Psalm 19, 51)
        4. Religion deals with outward, go through rituals—attend church, tithe, etc.
        5. God is interested in the heart, the inward
        6. God said through Isaiah that He hated the feast days and sacrifices (see Isaiah 1:11-15)
        7. They would say one thing and do another; their hearts weren't in it
        8. Overarching principle of this chapter
  2. Bodily discharge
    1. Seems that the first several verses deal with discharge from venereal disease (sin offering required—I did something wrong)
    2. Blood and water
      1. Question: why are we here?
        1. Believe that the work of God is done by the Word of God?
        2. We are washed and cleansed by the Word of God
        3. We need this cleansing all the time, every day
        4. First thing in the morning—open the Bible
        5. Jesus washed the disciples' feet (see John 13:1-17)
          1. Peter "give me a whole bath"
          2. Don't need a whole bath, just need your feet washed
          3. You are cleansed from sin when you are saved, but you walk in this world and your feet get dirty—washing by the Word daily
    3. Emission of semen vv. 16-18
      1. Normal activity within marriage, no sin offering required—no sin has been committed
      2. Why unclean until evening? Even the most normal, natural, God-given things are tainted by sin—we live in a sinful world (see Romans 8:21-22)
    4. Issue of blood—menstrual cycle
      1. Normal, no sin offering
      2. Why every month is she treated like a leper?
        1. Monthly reminder of the fall
        2. Separation of God from people
        3. World is tainted with sin and impurity
        4. Good practice within a marriage, "Guys, give your wives some space"
    5. Chronic flow—perhaps again a venereal disease
      1. Abnormal flow of blood—lasting long
      2. Sacrifice is required
      3. Insight into New Testament
        1. Woman comes to Jesus with a 12-year flow of blood (see Luke 8:43-48)
        2. Jesus' touch, touch Jesus—faith
        3. Faith in Jesus, not in the garment
        4. Book of Leviticus acted out in the New Testament
    6. Defile My tabernacle vv. 31-33
      1. Issues don't just defile personally
      2. As I'm involved the church, sin defiles corporately
      3. God is concerned about both
      4. This is about fellowship—my personal sin can affect everyone else
        1. Achan saw a garment and took it for himself (personal, private sin); whole congregation suffered (see Joshua 7:10-26)
        2. "If we walk in the light as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus Christ His Son cleanses us from all sin." 1 John 1:7
        3. Our personal relationship with Jesus doesn't mean we can live a private life and not have it defile the congregation
  3. Central focal point of the book of Leviticus, chapter 16
    1. Yom Kippur
      1. Highest holy day
      2. Seventh month, tenth day (September 13, Friday—this year, 2013)
      3. Chapter 16 of Leviticus is the Isaiah 53 of the Torah—the books of Moses
      4. Yom means day, Kippur means cover
        1. Sins covered, not erased
        2. The Old Testament pointed to a time where their sins and iniquities would not be remembered (see Hebrews 10:17)
        3. No need for all the monthly, yearly sacrifices
        4. Writer of Hebrews wrote, those sacrifices could never take away sin (see Hebrews 10:11)
    2. Chapter 16
      1. The preparation of the priest vv. 1-7
      2. The preparation of the place—the tabernacle vv. 8-19
      3. The preparation of the people vv. 20-34
      4. Types/Shadows in the Old Testament of New Testament truths
        1. Colossians talks about festivals, new moons, and Sabbaths which are shadows of things to come, but the substance is of Christ (see Colossians 2:17)
        2. Shadow of someone overtakes you, it becomes dark
          1. There is a person who cast the shadow
          2. You don't talk to the shadow
          3. The person is the substance of the shadow
          4. In Luke 24 Jesus, beginning at Moses, explained all the things concerning Himself (see Luke 24:13-27)
      5. General rules for Aaron and his sons
        1. You can't just come in at any time and hang out with God; why?
          1. In Exodus 25 the Lord says that He will meet with them above the mercy seat (see Exodus 25:22)
          2. Casual way some people meet with God
          3. There needs to be a holy familiarity "I'm in the presence of God!"
        2. Tent
          1. Only one approach/door
          2. Courtyard
          3. Holy place
          4. Holy of Holies
          5. Behind the veil, the ark of the covenant
          6. Once a year, the priest went in for a short time to sprinkle blood on the mercy seat
        3. Italicized words inserted by the translators—place v. 2
          1. Referred to only as The Holy
          2. Haqqodes
        4. Holy garments
          1. Exodus 28 the high priest was given different garments—ornate
          2. These garments are plain—the garments of a servant
          3. On the day of atonement he takes upon himself the garments of a servant
          4. "Christ Jesus, who, being in the form of God, did not consider it robbery to be equal with God, but made Himself of no reputation, taking the form of a bondservant, and coming in the likeness of men." Philippians 2:2-7
          5. That scene in picture form at the Last Supper, Jesus laid aside his garments and took the position of a servant and washed the feet of His disciples (see John 13:1-17)
          6. A verse that sums it up, "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God...and the Word became flesh." John 1:1, 14
        5. Two goats, one ram
          1. Five animals on the day of atonement
          2. Two for Aaron and his household—he is a sinner (see Hebrews 7:26-28)
          3. Imagine Moabites seeing tent, he wants to go in
          4. Only an Israelite, a Levite, the oldest son, can go in and only once a year for a short time
          5. Narrow is the way that leads to eternal life (see Matthew 7:14)
  4. Closing
    1. Praise God for our Lord Jesus Christ who made a way for us
      1. Still the way is narrow
      2. You have to believe in Jesus or there's no hope
      3. Jesus offers hope
      4. He came as the sacrifice and the High Priest
      5. He did all the heavy lifting, sweat blood (see Luke 22:44)
      6. You have to believe, trust
      7. Anyone, anywhere can believe and be saved
    2. But still people say, the way is so narrow
      1. Yes
      2. It's not that you can't take the narrow way; it must be that you won't
      3. He says that you can come, but you must believe
      4. People will take the broad way, that's their preference, it's safe
      5. You want to be countercultural, be a Christian


Hebrew terms:
הַקֹּ֑דֶשׁ; haq·qō·ḏeš;, the holy; ימים נוראים; Yom Kippur, day of atonement

Cross references: Genesis 22, Joshua 7:10-26, Psalm 19, 23, 51, Isaiah 1:11-15, 53, Matthew 7:14, Luke 8:43-48, 22:24, 24:13-27, John 3, 13:1-17, Philippians 2:2-7, Colossians 2:17, 2 Timothy 3:16, Hebrews 7:26-28, 10:11, 17, 1 John 1:7

Topic: personal holiness

Keywords: sin, discharge, bodily discharge, wash, water, blood, believe, priest, servant, Jesus

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 16:7-17:9
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 16:7-17:9
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2441

MESSAGE SUMMARY
God is concerned about us and about our sinful condition. As we consider our text, we discover the parallels between the sacrifice and the scapegoat on the Day of Atonement and Jesus' sacrifice and atonement at the cross.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 16-17
PREVIEW: In Leviticus 16-17, we learn about the Day of Atonement—that one day a year in which the sins of the nations were covered. We also learn that the blood contains the life of the creature.

Leviticus Outline:
The Day of Atonement - Read Leviticus 16:1-34
The Sanctity of Blood – Read Leviticus 17:1-16

The Day of Atonement - Read Leviticus 16:1-34
1. Leviticus 16:1 refers to the death of Nadab and Abihu (see Leviticus 10:1-2). In addition to offering profane fire (10:1) and possibly being drunk (10:9), where might these sons of Aaron have gone that they shouldn’t have (v. 2)?



2. What would happen if Aaron were to go inside the veil “at just any time” (v. 2)?



3. What was found in the Holy Place inside the veil (v. 2)? (See also Exodus 25:22 and Hebrews 9:3-5.)



4. Normally, the high priest would wear glorious garments—colorful robes bordered by pomegranates and bells, a jeweled breastplate, and a golden plate across his forehead. On the Day of Atonement, what was Aaron instructed to wear and do (v. 4)? How did Jesus, our great High Priest (Hebrews 4:14), do the same? (See Philippians 2:5-8.)




5. Aaron was to go into the Holy Place with the blood of a young bull and of a ram (v. 3). What was the young bull offered as (vv. 6, 11)? What was the ram offered as (v. 5)?




6. Two goats were selected and used on the Day of Atonement (v. 7). Lots were cast to distinguish between the goats; one was for the Lord and one was a scapegoat. What became of the Lord’s goat (v. 9)? What became of the scapegoat (vv. 10, 21-22)?




7. What was Aaron to bring with him inside the veil (v. 3, 12)? What was he to do with it (v. 13-14)?




8. What did Aaron do with the blood of the goat of the sin offering (v. 15)? Why did he do this (v. 16)?



9. With what substance did Aaron consecrate (make holy or sacred, sanctify) the altar (vv. 18-19)? Why that substance? (See Hebrews 9:22 and Leviticus 17:11.)




10. The word confess means to tell or make known, to acknowledge (sin) to God or a priest. What did Aaron confess when he placed both his hands upon the head of the scapegoat (v. 21)?




11. What declaration of God is the scapegoat an illustration of? (See Psalm 79:8, Jeremiah 31:34, Isaiah 43:25, and Hebrews 8:12.)




12. What was done with the flesh of the bull and goat that were offered as sin offerings (v. 27)? Where was this done?




13. What day of the year was the Day of Atonement (v. 29)? What were the people to do on this day (vv. 29-31)?




14. How often could the High Priest enter the Holy of Holies to make atonement for his sin and the sins of the nation (v. 34)?




The Sanctity of Blood - Read Leviticus 17:1-16
15. When the Israelites were in Egypt for 400 years, they were involved in idolatry. God brought them out of Egypt and wanted to get Egypt out of them. What did God forbid them to do (vv. 1-7)?




16. What were the consequences for doing what God forbade (v. 4)?




17. The word for demons (v. 7) is literally “having the form of a goat or satyr.” What would happen if the children of Israel were to offer their sacrifices to demons and play the harlot (v. 9)? (See also Exodus 22:20.) Why were they to avoid this? (See 1 Corinthians 10:20.)




18. What were the children of Israel and strangers dwelling among them forbidden to consume (vv. 10, 12)? Why were they forbidden to consume this substance (v. 11)?




19. What was a hunter to do before he ate an animal or bird that he killed(v.13 )? Why did he have to do this (v. 14)?




20. What would become of the person who found a dead animal and ate parts of it but did not obey that command (v. 16)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Skip offended his father; longed for forgiveness
    2. Jesus' first words from the cross, "Father, forgive them" Luke 23:34
    3. Our greatest need: forgiveness
    4. The Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur), once-a-year forgiveness
      1. Solemn
      2. Deep contemplation
      3. Kippur means to cover, yom means day
        1. In the Old Testament, sins were not completely removed, they were covered over
        2. The blood of goats and bulls could never take away sin (see Hebrews 10:4)
      4. In anticipation of the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world (see John 1:29)
    5. Review of chapter 16
      1. vv. 1-7, preparation of the priest; special clothes, offering for own sin
      2. vv. 8-19, preparation of the place; tabernacle must be cleansed
      3. vv. 20-34, preparation of the people;
  2. The Day of Atonement 16:8-34
    1. Cast lots
      1. Holy dice
      2. One said "for the Lord," the other said, "for Azazel"
        1. Azazel is translated scape goat
        2. Azazel is a place in the wilderness, a precipice that was the entrance to the desert
        3. The goat bearing the people's sins would run away into the wilderness
    2. Mercy seat
      1. When the children of Israel were in the wilderness, Moses met with the Lord in the tent of meeting (see Exodus 33)
        1. Moses wanted to see the Lord's glory
        2. The Lord passed by and Moses saw some of His glory, the afterglow
      2. On Mount Sinai, Moses spoke with the Lord through the fog
      3. The high priest, reminiscent of that, is to go into the Holy of Holies where the mercy seat is
        1. Dark in the Holy of Holies, he couldn't see clearly
        2. He would sprinkle blood on the lid
      4. Inside the Holy of Holies (Ark of the Covenant) there were three things
        1. Golden pot of manna
        2. Aaron's rod
        3. Copy of the Ten Commandments, a testimony of their failure
      5. Blood covered the sins of the people
        1. Propitiate, an atoning sacrifice
        2. In Greek: hilasmos, from root word hilastérion, translated means mercy seat
        3. Jesus Christ is our mercy seat—transforms the place of judgment into a place of mercy
          1. The priest sprinkled the blood seven times
          2. Jesus had seven wounds
            1. Crown of thorns on His head
            2. Roman whip on His back
            3. Two spikes through His hands
            4. His two feet
            5. Spear in His side
        4. Blood-splattered slab, flanked by two angels
          1. In the New Testament when the women go into Jesus' empty tomb, they would have seen a blood-splattered slab, flanked by two angels
          2. Begin to understand that He is our atonement, our mercy seat
        5. The east side
          1. Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane
          2. East of the altar
          3. Sweat drops of blood
      6. Two goats
        1. One goat killed; "the wages of sin is death" Romans 6:23
        2. One goat set free, speaks of life (see 1 John 1:9)
          1. One man, the high priest, alone; Put hand on the live goat and confessed all the sins of the children of Israel
          2. Sent the goat away into the wilderness, out of sight
          3. "As far as the east is from the west, so far has He removed our sins from us" Psalm 103:12
          4. Jeremiah predicts a new covenant (see Jeremiah 31:31-34)
        3. Jesus our sin offering, the goat that was slain
        4. Jesus our scapegoat, takes our sins out of sight
          1. Santa makes a list, checks it twice
          2. Jesus destroys the whole list (see Colossians 2:14)
      7. Priest does not sit down, he still has work to do, his day is not over yet
        1. Jesus, our High Priest, sat down (see Hebrews 10:11-12)
        2. Jesus said, "It is finished;" there is no more work to do (see John 19:28)
      8. Afflict your souls
        1. Fasting
        2. Know what is going on
        3. Mourn their sin
        4. Preparation before a festival
          1. Festival in Scotland, Communion tokens
          2. Prepare to take the Lord's Supper
        5. Solemn
          1. Not a happy time
          2. A time to afflict your souls
          3. The happy moment was when the scapegoat was released and gone from sight
    3. Two festivals very close to each other: Rosh Hashanah, Jewish New Year and Yom Kippur, Day of Atonement
      1. Together they are Yamim Nora'im, days of awe
      2. Ten days between the two were known as days of repentance or preparation
      3. This ritual stopped in AD 70 with the destruction of the temple
        1. Problem for the Jewish people because without the shedding of blood there is no remission of sins (see Hebrews 9:22)
        2. History of Jews says that they went to Rabi Yohanan ben Zakai
        3. Judaism took one of two turns; some followed Paul proclaiming Jesus Messiah, some followed Yohanan be Zakai
        4. Yohanan be Zakai said the people just need to reflect and to do nice things for people
        5. They still have the problem, there is no shed blood for their sins
        6. The answer is Jesus once for all (see Hebrews 10:10)
    4. The code of holiness—holy, different, separate
      1. Great truth is the value of blood and a central place for worship
      2. Children of Israel have come from a false worship system; it affects them
      3. God lays down some laws; no slaughter except at the door of the Tabernacle; He wants the church to be centralized
        1. Tabernacle-centered people; Tabernacle is the heart of the community
        2. European towns were built that way; church with a steeple in the middle of town
        3. Peace offerings (see Leviticus 3), at the door of the Tabernacle; God wants to be invited to dinner
          1. He doesn't want the people acting like the Egyptians and others—just going out and doing their own thing on any hill
          2. God specifies the place: the tabernacle; eventually He gets even more specific: Jerusalem
          3. The place the Lord chooses (see Deuteronomy 12)
            1. Corporate/together
            2. Centralized in one place
          4. The tendency was to follow the worship system of those around them, thus they would lose the revelation that God gave them
        4. In the New Testament Jesus refers to "My church" (see Matthew 16:18)
          1. Ekklésia; church, called out group of people
          2. Book of Acts, they were together and met in one accord
          3. Many today say, "Why do I need church?"
        5. Worship needs to be corporate and together
          1. We need other people
            1. God created people to be social beings, to be set with other people         
            2. "God sets the solitary in families" Psalm 68:6
            3. We derive strength from being with people
            4. "If one member of the body suffers, we all suffer" 1 Corinthians 12:26
            5. There's strength when we take each other's sorrow
            6. When someone rejoices we can rejoice with them
          2. We need God's principles
            1. World values bombard us each day
            2. Need to counter that with consistent doses of truth (1 Timothy 3:15)
            3. Be taught, learn the truth of God's principles
          3. We need God's purpose
            1. Everyone wants to be part of a noble cause
            2. God's cause is the great cause
            3. Our partnership in the gospel (see Philippians 1:5)
            4. Become a part of God's plan for His kingdom on this earth
          4. We need God's presence
            1. Bible speaks of special promises of His presence when two or more are together
            2. Personal relationship with God
            3. Needs of community, not just myself
            4. You are a member of the body; only when you gather with others are you the body
          5. Tuba players are only great in concert with other instruments, in harmony
          6. A Christian without a church is like a football player without a team; we need each other
        6. They shall not worship demons
          1. They were starting to worship false gods in a false manner
          2. In Hebrew the word demons is translated goat demons
          3. Egypt god Mendes was the goat god
          4. The time of the Greeks the god Pan was depicted as a goat
          5. In many of the medieval pictures, the devil is depicted as a goat
        7. Do not eat blood, will continue this next week
  3. Closing
    1. There are two ways to do worship
      1. Imagination–you make it up as you go along
      2. This is what God says, and I'm going do it His way
    2. The people of Israel were surrounded
      1. Polytheism–worship of many gods
        1. Egypt–where they came from
        2. Canaan–where they were going to
      2. Pantheism–God is impersonal, the sum of all creation
        1. Greek
        2. Roman
        3. And today, New Age movement
      3. Henotheism–every city, state, or nation had their own god–gods compete with each other during wartime
        1. A twist: when a prince of one country marries a princess of another country
        2. King Ahab marries Jezebel
        3. King Solomon introduces idolatry–marries 1,000 women
        4. 666, dig it out


Hebrew terms: י֤וֹם כִּפֻּרִים֙; yom kippur, Day of Atonement; ראש השנה ; Rosh Hashanah, head of the year; ימים נוראים ; Yamim Nora'im, days of awe

Greek terms: ἱλασμός, οῦ, ὁ; hilasmos, a propitiation, atoning sacrifice; ἱλαστήριον, ου, τό; hilastérion, a sin offering, covering; ekklésia; an assembly, congregation, church

Figures referenced: Yohanan ben Zakai

Cross references: Exodus 33, Leviticus 3, Deuteronomy 12, Psalm 68:6, 103:12, Jeremiah 31:31-34, Matthew 16:18, Luke 23:34, John 1:29, 19:28, Acts, Romans 6:23, 1 Corinthians 12:26, Philippians 1:5, Colossians 2:14, 1 Timothy 3:15, Hebrews 9:22, 10:4, 10-12, 1 John 1:9

Topic: Day of Atonement

Keywords: Jesus, atonement, sacrifice, blood, false worship, true worship, law, priest, tabernacle, church

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 17:10-16
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 17:10-16
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2442

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Does the blood really matter? Lamb after lamb, endless sacrifices every year, blood poured out for the sins of the people? Yes! God makes a big deal about blood and He forbade eating it because the life is in the blood. We examine the stark contrast of endless sacrifices with the one sacrifice that made all the difference—the blood of the Savior poured out once for all. And through communion, we celebrate the sacrifice Jesus Christ made for us all.

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Leviticus is probably not your go-to book in the Bible for comfort
    2. It's a book that you may get stalled in on your quest to read through the Bible
    3. In ancient times, the Jews began teaching their children in Leviticus; pure laws of God
    4. In the chapter 17 and the rest of the book, we are in the holiness code
      1. Holy
      2. Wholeness
      3. The way to happiness is holiness
        1. Happiness is never found by direct pursuit
        2. Happiness is a byproduct of holiness
        3. When you seek to please the Lord rather than yourself, there is a joy that permeates your life
    5. Big picture of studying the Bible from Genesis, Exodus, and Leviticus
      1. Genesis-condemnation for sin
      2. Exodus-redemption from sin
      3. Leviticus-sanctification from sin
    6. Leviticus is a bloody book
      1. Shows the awfulness of sin
      2. Shows the graciousness of God in covering sin
      3. The New Testament tells us that the wages of sin is death (see Romans 6:23)
      4. Offerings prescribed
        1. Burnt offering
        2. Grain offering
        3. Peace offering
        4. Sin offering
        5. Trespass offering
        6. Bulls
        7. Goats
        8. Lambs
        9. Pigeons
        10. Turtledoves
    7. Big truth of chapter 17: blood is sacred
      1. They were in danger of adopting the worship system Egypt
        1. Killing animals at will
        2. Sacrificing to Egyptian gods and goddesses
      2. God wants them to be different, holy, complete
  2. Blood makes atonement for the soul, the life of the flesh is in the blood
    1. Blood
      1. Don't eat it
        1. Ancient people ate the blood of animals in order to take on the characteristic traits of that animal
        2. UK has blood pudding; congealed blood
      2. Nathan Heitzig bit his tongue nearly in half; a basin of blood
      3. Blood is the life fluid; the average human has 12 pints
      4. To shed blood is to end life
      5. Required to cover sin
      6. Blood is mentioned in the Bible 424 times in 357 verses
    2. Kosher, drain the blood
      1. Meat bled
      2. Shechita, the law of making meat kosher
      3. Approach an animal with dignity, respect, and compassion
      4. Judaizers thought the gentile believers should keep all the kosher laws and regulations (see Acts 15 and Galatians 2:14)
    3. Blood diseases were more prevalent then
    4. Sanctity of life (see Hebrews 9:22)
    5. Current trend in churches is to not mention the blood
      1. Nobody wants a bloody religion
      2. Feminist theologian, Dolores Williams said, "I don't think we need a theory of atonement at all. I don't think we need folks hanging on crosses and blood dripping and weird stuff."
    6. God makes a big deal about blood
      1. The penalty for sin is death
      2. Nothing but death can atone for sin
      3. If you want to atone for your own sins, then don't accept Christ
      4. If you don't want to die for your own sins and go to hell (the punishment), then receive Christ
    7. Atonement principle taught in the book of Genesis
      1. Adam and Eve sinned
      2. "In the day that you eat of it you shall surely die" Genesis 2:17
      3. They didn't die physically, they died spiritually
      4. They tried to cover themselves
      5. God killed animals, took the skins, and covered them
    8. Blood atonement
      1. Sacrifices in Exodus
      2. Sprinkling of blood on judgment seat turned mercy seat in Leviticus
      3. Jesus, the lamb of God in the New Testament (see John 1:29)
    9. Eating what dies naturally or killed by beasts
      1. Clean animals that died without being slaughtered in a kosher manner
      2. Not properly drained
      3. Unclean for a period of time
      4. Penalty is not as great
    10. Jesus said, "Most assuredly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink His blood, you have no life in you. Whoever eats My flesh and drinks My blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day" (John 6:53-54).
      1. Shocked people—got their attention
      2. He's not saying to be cannibals
      3. He's not talking about the wine and bread literally becoming His flesh
      4. It meant to behold and believe in Him (see John 6:40)
      5. True life can only come by Christ's death—His atonement for our sin
  3. Closing
    1. Distinguishing mark of the Old Testament sacrificial system was that it was done over, and over, and over again
      1. Tedious
      2. Endless
    2. The covenant that we enjoy
      1. Once for all time
      2. Do this in remembrance of Jesus, Jesus did it for you (see Luke 22:19)
    3. Six hours one Friday, by Max Lucado
      1. Normal Friday
      2. The six hours that Jesus hung on the cross
      3. The Lamb of God, one sacrifice for all time
    4. Take the elements
      1. Don't look at them, look through them—like a pair of glasses
      2. Lenses by which you view life, God, your future
      3. Charles Spurgeon said, "We are never more near to God than when we view Him through the lens of these elements"
      4. Justin Marbury and Jarrett Petero pray for the elements


Hebrew terms: שחיטה; shechita, the ritual slaughter of mammals and birds for food according to Jewish dietary laws
Publications referenced: Six hours one Friday, by Max Lucado
Figures referenced: Dolores Williams, Max Lucado, Charles Spurgeon
Cross references: Genesis 2:17, Luke 22:19, Acts 15, Romans 6:23, Galatians 2:14, Hebrews 9:22

Topic: Blood

Keywords: Blood, sacrifice, Christ, sin, ritual, atonement, kosher, communion

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 18:1-19:18
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 18:1-19:18
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2444

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In Leviticus 18:1-19:18, God gives His ordinances for sexual morality and the moral and ceremonial laws. We discover that God wants His people to be distinct, separate, holy—set apart from the world. We keep His ordinances and we love one another because He is the Lord, He is holy.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 18-19
PREVIEW: In Leviticus 18-19, God gives His ordinances for sexual morality and the moral and ceremonial laws. We'll discover that God's people were called to be holy and distinct from the world by keeping His ordinances and loving each other, because He is the Lord.

Leviticus Outline:
Laws of Sexual Morality - Read Leviticus 18:1-30
Moral and Ceremonial Laws - Read Leviticus 19:1-37

Laws of Sexual Morality - Read Leviticus 18:1-30
1. The word "according" means to cause to conform or agree. What, doings were the children of Israel not to conform or agree with (v. 3)?



2. What were those doings that the Lord commanded His children not to conform or agree with? (See Joshua 24:14, Ezekiel 20:7-8, Exodus 23:24, and Deuteronomy 12:30-31.)



3. What reason is given for the children of Israel to not conform to these doings (v. 2)?



4. How are we, as God's children, not to conform to the, "doings" of the world around us? (See Psalm 101:2-4, Psalms 141:4, 1 Thessalonians 4:7, 5:22, Ephesians 5:11, 2 Peter 1:3-4, Hebrews 12:1, Romans 12:1-2, and 1 John 3:3.)


5. God offers His children a solution to keep them from the doings of Egypt and Canaan. What is that solution (vv. 4-5)?



6. How does this solution make the children of God different from Egypt and Canaan, sanctifying and making them holy? (See Leviticus 11:144, 19:2, 20:7, 26, Exodus 19:6, Deuteronomy 14:2, Matthew 5:48, and John 17:17.)




7. In Leviticus 18, "to uncover the nakedness," "to take," "to approach," and "to lie with" are all phrases which speak of incest—sexual relations between persons who are closely related—which was forbidden in every form. Make a list of who is mentioned as forbidden and incestuous (vv. 6-18).



8. Sexual relations with a woman during her time of customary impurity was forbidden (v. 19). What was the consequence of approaching a woman to uncover her nakedness during this time? (See Leviticus 15:24, 20:18)




9. Lying carnally with your neighbor's wife was forbidden (v. 20). What were the consequences for violating this ordinance of God? (See Exodus 20:14, Leviticus 20:10, Matthew 5:27-28, 1 Corinthians 6:9, and Hebrews 13:4.)




10. The phrase "pass through the fire" (v. 21) referred to sacrificing your children to a false god as an offering unto them. Molech was the Canaanite god of prosperity. The Canaanites made idols of Molech—five feet high with a hollow stomach—out of cast iron. They built fires in the bellies of these idols, heated them to the point of incandescence, and placed their babies as sacrifices on their red-hot arms. What was the consequence for violating this ordinance of God? (See Leviticus 20:2--5, and Deuteronomy 12:31.)




11. Homosexuality was expressly forbidden (v. 22) and was referred to as an abomination, which means abhorrence, loathsome and disgusting. What was the consequence for violating this ordinance of God? (See Leviticus 20:13, Romans 1:27)




12. Bestiality, having sexual relations with an animal, was expressly forbidden (v. 22). It was referred to as a perversion, which means a sexual practice or act considered abnormal or deviant. What was the consequence for violating this ordinance of God? (See Exodus 22:19, Leviticus 20:15-16, and Deuteronomy 27:21.)




13. What is the consequence for violating the ordinance of God? (See Isaiah 59:2, Romans 6:23, 1 John 5:16-17, and Deuteronomy 30:15-20.)




14. What would the land do to those nations that lived in perpetual violation of God's ordinances (vv. 24-29)? (See also Genesis 3:17 and Romans 8:19--22.)




15. What has God provided to keep His children from abominable customs (v. 30)? (See also John 17:17, 19, 8:32, 15:3, Psalm 19:7, 119:9-11, Ephesians 5:26, James 1:21, and 1 Peter 1:22-23.)


Moral and Ceremonial Laws - Read Leviticus 19:1-37
16. How are God's children to treat their mother and father (v. 3)? (See also Exodus 20:12.)




17. God commanded His children to keep His sabbaths (v. 3). What sabbaths is He referring to? (See Exodus 16:23, 20:8, 31:13, and Leviticus 23, 25:1-2.)




18. God commanded His children to not make idols or molded gods (v. 4). Why? (See Exodus 20:4, Psalm 96:5, 115:4--7, Ezekiel 16:36, and 1 Corinthians 10:14.)




19. When could the freewill peace offering be eaten (vv. 5-6)? When could it not be eaten (v. 7)? What would it be considered if it was eaten when it could not be eaten (v. 7)? What happened to the person who ate it when it should not have been eaten (v. 8)?




20. What were God's children not to do when they harvested their land (v.9)? Why (v. 10)?




21. God wanted His people to be holy and represent Him to the world. (See Exodus 19:6, Leviticus 20:26, and Deuteronomy 7:6, 26:19, 28:9.) How were God's children to treat one another? List the ways mentioned (vv. 11-18).





22. Contained within the list of ways that God's children were to treat one another is a repeated reason for treating one another in such a manner, what is that reason (vv. 12, 14, 16, 18)?





23. Oftentimes we can feel overwhelmed by the vast number of ordinances which govern our conduct. However, a principle is set forth in Leviticus 19:18 that summarizes God's desire for how we treat one another. What is that principle? How does it summarize God's desire for how we treat one another? (See Mark 12:31, Romans 13:9, Galatians 5:14, and James 2:8.)





24. What things did God not want His children to mix (v. 19)? Why do you think He didn't want these mixed?




25. Death was the punishment for committing adultery (Leviticus 20:10 and Deuteronomy 22:23--29), but in Leviticus 19:20-22, the adulterers were to be scourged and make a trespass offering. What differentiates this act of lying carnally with a woman from the sin of adultery, which is punishable by death?




26. How long were the children of Israel to wait to eat fruit from trees they planted once they arrived into the Promised Land (vv. 23-25)? Why were they to wait so long?




27. Consuming blood was a forbidden practice for the children of Israel (v.26, Leviticus 17:10-14). God forbids His children from practicing pagan religious customs. In addition to consuming blood, what other practices does God forbid (vv. 26-28)?




28. The children of Israel were forbidden to prostitute their daughters (v. 29). Why? (See Leviticus 21:9 and Deuteronomy 22:21; 23:17-18.)




29. God forbids His children from seeking after mediums and familiar spirits (v.31). Why? (See Leviticus 20:6, 27 and Deuteronomy 18:11.)




30. Respecting the aged was commanded by God. What were the children of Israel to do in the presence of an old man (v. 32)?




31. How were God's children to treat the strangers who dwelt among them (v. 33-34)? Why were they to extend this type of treatment?




32. How were God's children to deal in their judgments and weights with one another?




33. How are you and I, as followers of Jesus Christ, to treat one another? (See John 13:34-35)




DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. The first half of Leviticus, chapters 1-16, are about approaching God's presence
    2. The second half is about accepting God's precepts
    3. Acknowledge God's person—God is holy
      1. Holiness is the least attractive of God's attributes
      2. God's holiness is what is most talked about in the Word
      3. God is distinct, unique, separate; we are to be like Him
      4. Jesus taught us to pray, "Holy is Your Name" (see Matthew 6:9)
      5. Third person of the Trinity is called Holy Spirit
      6. In this age we should be all about God's holiness
    4. Chapters 18 and 19 show the depravity of man; these chapters take the Ten Commandments and break them down into specific details around moral behavior
  2. Don't be like the pagans/the world—the Egyptians nor the Canaanites
    1. Why not? "I am the Lord"
      1. 42 times from chapter 18 through the end of the book this is mentioned
      2. It's based on the character of God to us and the claim of God over us
      3. 430 years the Israelites were in Egypt, a very advanced country, yet very immoral
    2. Who not to have sexual relations with
      1. "Uncover nakedness" speaks of sexual relations, not just seeing someone naked
      2. God wants to be part of every corner of your life
      3. Incest is forbidden by God
      4. In Egyptian culture, family members married each other
      5. In Deuteronomy 25, exception to this law called the law of the levirate marriage
      6. God is amplifying the seventh commandment, "You shall not commit adultery" Exodus 20:14
        1. A fence of protection around the family
        2. The family is the core unit of any culture or nation
        3. If the family is weakened, then the nation is weakened
        4. Exactly what is happening in America
      7. Sexual sin
        1. Fashionable socially
          1. Time Magazine article looked at religious America; 31% of "religious America" had or were currently having some sort of sexual affair
          2. Many saw nothing wrong with it
          3. The 60s sexual revolution
            1. Nothing new, it just became fashionable again
            2. Stephen Stills song "Love the One You're With"
        2. Fatal relationally
          1. Hurts you (see Proverbs 6:32)
            1. Physically
            2. Emotionally
            3. Spiritually
          2. Hurts your family
            1. Breaks the oneness bond with your spouse
            2. Causes your children to question and not trust and having bonding problems later in life
          3. Hurts people around you
            1. The whole church
            2. Every disobedient Christian weakens the church
            3. "If one member suffers, all the members suffer with it" 1 Corinthians 12:26
            4. It keeps unbelievers from coming to Christ
          4. It hurts the Lord
            1. David and Bathsheba (see Psalm 51:4)
            2. God is typically the last one considered when people have an affair
        3. Menstrual Cycle
          1. Woman is low emotionally and her estrogen is low
          2. Don't make physical/sexual demands
          3. Blood is considered sacred
        4. Molech, Pagan deity
          1. Ammonite god—god of pleasure
          2. Cast iron statue with a fire inside
          3. Babies burned on the red hot arms of Molech
          4. Abortion, babies burned with saline in the wombs of their mothers
        5. Homosexuality
          1. An abomination
          2. Hotly debated today
          3. Not a popular thing for preachers to talk about
          4. Maybe one day outlawed to preach on this
          5. God may call Skip into a prison ministry
          6. Genesis 19, Judges 19, Leviticus 18, 20, Romans 1, 2 Corinthians 6, and 1 Timothy 1 are all Scriptures that speak on the topic of homosexuality
          7. Those passages are being reinterpreted or reconstructed by the gay and lesbian lobby and homosexual churches
          8. Begin by looking at the positive passages about marriage
            1. God made a special creation, a helper suitable to him (see Genesis 2)
            2. Jesus endorsed creation (see Matthew 19:4-6)
            3. God's original design: heterosexual gender, marriage, and fidelity
        6. Law for them and the stranger among them
          1. Legislate righteousness
          2. Judge says whether something is wrong or right
        7. The land will vomit you out
          1. History shows that cultures who exhibit these behaviors do collapse
          2. Is God going to judge America?
            1. The gavel has been dropped
            2. Feeling and seeing the judgment of God before your eyes
            3. Our nation has said what it wants
          3. "Righteousness exalts a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people" Proverbs 14:34
    3. The Ten Commandments revisited, repeated and applied
      1. Offerings, Sabbaths, relationship to the poor, gossip
      2. In Exodus, the last chapter talked about the implements in the temple (see Exodus 40)
        1. All of those items were holy
        2. Set apart for a specific use
        3. Holy teapot
        4. Your life, your body is for the purpose for God
          1. Your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit (see 1 Corinthians 6:19)
          2. Worship happens in the temple
          3. Figure out the best way that can be done given your talents and callings
          4. Helps you understand repentance
            1. Turn from sin, and
            2. Turn to God
      3. First and second commandment
        1. Worship the true God
        2. Worship Him in the true way
          1. How you worship
          2. Forbids worshiping Him in any way that He has not said
          3. Not just how you think, we don't have the right to mold God into some image
          4. J.I. Packer said, "Metal images are simply a result of mental images."
      4. Peace offering
        1. Unique
        2. Voluntary
        3. I love God and I'm thankful
        4. Big celebratory feast to the Lord
        5. Why burn it?
          1. Dig in
          2. Don't snack in My presence, feast in My presence
      5. Gleaning in the fields
        1. Way for them to take care of the less-fortunate
        2. Welfare system
        3. 10-20% of the crop
        4. They had to gather it—work for it
        5. Book of Ruth is a good example of this
        6. Jesus and the disciples gleaned on the Sabbath (see Mark 2:23-28)
      6. Cruel human nature
        1. Bullies in school
        2. Happens in every generation
        3. Some animals are often destroyed by other animals
          1. Modern education says you are nothing more than an animal—evolved, a marvelous, wonderful, freak of nature
          2. Why should they be surprised when we act like animals
          3. Act like God's people, you are not animals
      7. Talebearer, a gossip
        1. Talebearer or a concerned friend
        2. A butcher or a surgeon
        3. Tell the difference between news and gossip—a shout or a whisper
      8. Love your neighbor as yourself


Publications referenced: Time Magazine

Figures referenced: Stephen Stills, J.I. Packer

Cross references: Genesis 2, 19, Exodus 20:14, 40, Leviticus 20, Deuteronomy 25, Judges 19, Ruth, Psalm 51:4, Proverbs 6:32, 14:34, Matthew 6:9, 19:4, Mark 2:23-28, Romans 1, 1 Corinthians 6:19, 12:26, 2 Corinthians 6, 1 Timothy 1

Topic: Morality

Keywords: holiness, sex, homosexual, heterosexual, relationships, adultery, Ten Commandments

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 19:17-21:12
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 19:17-21:12
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2446

MESSAGE SUMMARY
God calls us to be different from the world—a holy priesthood. In this text He lays out the His moral and ceremonial laws, His instructions for administering capital punishment, and His regulations for the priests. And we are reminded that while our outward actions may appear holy and righteous before men, God sees what is in our hearts.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 20-21
PREVIEW: In Leviticus 20-21, we find that severe penalties such as death were required punishments for those who intentionally broke God’s laws. We’ll also learn about some of the regulations that governed the priests’ conduct and lifestyle.

Penalties for Breaking the Law – Read Leviticus 20:1-27
1. Molech was worshiped in the ancient Near East in the second millennium BC and was associated with death and the underworld. The name Molech means "king;" he was the main god in the Amonite pantheon of false gods. Molech promised pleasure and prosperity to those who placed their babies on the red-hot arms of the idols representing him. What did God command to be done to those who gave any of their descendants to Molech (v. 2)?




2. What would God do to those who gave any of his descendants to Molech (v. 3)?




3. How was the punishment for giving any descendants to Molech supposed to be delivered (v. 2)? Who would deliver this punishment?




4. If the people of the land hid their eyes in any way from the man who gave any of his descendants to Molech, and did not kill him, what would God do (v. 5)?




5. What is a modern-day example of sacrificing children to Molech?




6. "The person who turns to mediums and familiar spirits"(v. 6) refers to to necromancy—the practice of communicating with the spirits of the dead in order to predict the future. This practice was strictly forbidden by God. What were the results of turning to a medium (v. 6, 27)? (See also Leviticus 19:31 and 1 Samuel 28:3-25.)




7. Rather than seek after mediums or Molech for prosperity, God’s children were to consecrate themselves and be holy by keeping God’s statutes and performing them (v. 7-8). How are we to practice holiness? (See Matthew 5:48, 1 Thessalonians 4:7, and 1 Peter 1:15-16.)




8. Cursing father or mother wasn’t just talking evil about them or cussing at them disrespectfully, but calling down curses upon them. This is a direct violation of the fifth commandment (see Exodus 20:12). What was the punishment for this sin (v. 9)? (See also Exodus 21:17, Proverbs 20:20, and Matthew 15:4.)




9. Adultery is forbidden by God (see Exodus 20:14). What was the punishment for consensual adultery between a man and a woman (v. 10)?




10. Incest, the statutory crime of sexual relations with a near relative, is forbidden by God. “To uncover the nakedness,” “to take,” “to approach,” and “to lie with” are all phrases which speak of incest—sexual relations between persons who are closely related—which was forbidden in every form in Leviticus 18. Leviticus 20:10-14 seem to refer to consensual acts. What was the punishment for this type of wickedness (vv. 10-14)?




11. Homosexuality is expressly forbidden (v. 13) and is referred to as an abomination, which means abhorrent, loathsome, and disgusting. What was the consequence for violating this ordinance of God? (See Leviticus 18:22 and Romans 1:27.)




12. Bestiality, having sexual relations with an animal, is expressly forbidden (vv. 15-16). It is referred to as a perversion, which means a sexual practice or act considered abnormal or deviant. What was the consequence for violating this ordinance of God? (See Exodus 22:19, Leviticus 18:23, and Deuteronomy 27:21.)




13. Additional types of incestuous relationships are forbidden (vv. 17-21). List the additional forbidden incestuous relationships (vv. 17, 19-21).




14. God truly wanted to bless His children by giving them a land flowing with milk and honey (v. 24), but He didn’t want them to walk in the statutes of the nations that lived in the land before them (v. 23). Because He loved them, He gave them statutes and judgments to live by (v. 22). How were they to live amongst those nations that God was casting out before them (v. 26)?



Regulations for Conduct of Priests – Read Leviticus 21:1-24
15. Priests were not to defile themselves by touching dead bodies. What exception is made for this ordinance (vv. 2-4)?





16. The shaving of the head, cutting of the beard, and cutting of the flesh were all practices of an Egyptian death cult. Why were the priests to not bear these markings for the dead (vv.5-6)?




17. The priests were allowed to marry. Although certain religions in our culture restrict priests from being married, God allowed it with restrictions. What restrictions were placed on a priest and the wife he would take (v. 7)?




18. What would become of a priest’s daughter who played the harlot by being sexually immoral (v. 9)?




19. What was the high priest forbidden to do (vv. 10-15)? Whom was he required to marry (v. 13)?




20. The male descendants of Aaron were considered the priests of the children of Israel. However, not all of them could serve as priests inside the Tabernacle. What excluded a descendant of Aaron from this type of service (vv. 16-23)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. The Ten Commandments in detail
    1. Don't hate your brother
      1. Don't keep it pent up inside
      2. Don't hold a grudge
      3. Don't passively-aggressively give him the cold shoulder
      4. This leads to hatred
    2. Love your neighbor
      1. Old Testament verse most-often quoted: "You shall love your neighbor" Leviticus 19:18
      2. Jesus said this was the second greatest commandment (see Matthew 22:39)
    3. Important principle in this chapter: the law of God is not simply to govern your outward action
      1. It governs how people think
      2. Sin is committed inwardly first (see 1 John 3:15)
      3. Lust begins in the heart, leads to adultery
      4. Covetousness begins in the heart, leads to stealing
      5. Murder can begin with hatred
    4. Don't let livestock or seed mix
      1. Paul instructed that Christians should not be unequally yoked with unbelievers—to be separate, be devoted (see 2 Corinthians 6:14-17)
      2. Principle is one of separation
        1. Know the difference
        2. Make the difference
        3. Be separate
      3. The seed is the Word of God (see Matthew 13)
        1. Some Christians want to sow mixed seed
        2. Other religious systems
        3. Other good thoughts
        4. Best pickings from world religions
    5. Sexual relations with a slave girl
      1. Scourging and trespass offering
      2. The man was to bring a trespass offering
      3. Act of graciousness on God's part (he didn't receive the death penalty)
      4. The responsibility was the man's
      5. Everyone is hurt by sexual sin, everyone gets hurt
    6. Planting trees for food, eating the fruit of the land
      1. A reminder that the land and the produce were a free gift from the Lord
      2. The produce isn't mature for several years
      3. This is also true of the Christian; Paul tells Timothy not to lay hands on a person suddenly; watch their life to see if there was genuine maturity (see 1 Timothy 5:22)
    7. Don't consult mediums or spirits, God has your future—consult Him
    8. No tattooing or body piercing
      1. Qualifying phrase: for the dead
      2. This was a practice of the Egyptian and Canaanite death cults; it was a part of their mourning process
      3. To live longer, be spared death
      4. Tattoo and cut to appease their gods
    9. Honor the grey headed
      1. Growing to love this verse more and more
      2. Give honor to whom honor is due
      3. Our culture is about youth
        1. Calvary Chapel was based around a youth movement
        2. Mark Twain said, "Youth is wasted on the young"
      4. In the South they give honor, show respect, have manners
    10. Strangers/foreigners in the land
      1. Love him as yourself
      2. How do you feel around foreigners in your country?
      3. The Israelites were foreigners in Egypt
      4. They are going into a land where they are foreigners
      5. We are foreigners, we're just passing through, this is not our home (see Philippians 3:20)
      6. Brotherly love should continue, be careful how you treat strangers, they might be angels (see Hebrews 13:2)
    11. Integrity in the workplace and marketplace
      1. You are cheating one another, you should have honest scales and weights (see Amos 9)
      2. Quick challenge: integrity in the workplace
        1. Watch the Lord, not the clock
        2. Do your work to honor God
          1. Our job is our stage to show the world how Christians behave; you are being studied
          2. Live good lives that the world will see and glorify God (see 1 Peter 2:12)
          3. Skip lived and served on a kibbutz in his 20s; Christians witnessed by their love and hard work—service; crating chickens for Passover season
      3. 2nd Century Christian apologist Justin Martyr said, "Many who have come in contact with us [Christians]...were overcome and changed from violent and tyrannical characters either from having watched the consistency of Christian neighbors, or from having observed the wonderful patience of Christian travelers when over-charged, or from simply doing business with Christians"
      4. Businesses are hesitant to hire Christians, they want special favors
      5. Best witness you can give is to work hard!
  2. Capital Punishment
    1. Secularists and liberals will often point their fingers at Old Testament law and accuse that it is not much different from the codes of other ancient cultures
    2. The big difference is brutality vs. compassion
    3. It predates the law of Moses, "Whoever sheds man's blood, by man his blood shall be shed" Genesis 9:6
    4. List of punishable crimes
      1. Murder
      2. Sexual immorality
      3. Child kidnapping
      4. Child sacrifice
      5. Witchcraft
      6. False prophets
      7. Astrology
      8. Magic
      9. Idolatry
    5. It was never considered murder; it was righteously administered judicial execution
    6. Chapters 18 and 20 are virtually identical in the sins they cover
      1. 18 is addressed to the perpetrators
      2. 20 to the congregation; how to handle
    7. Those who sacrifice to the Ammonite god Molech shall be put to death
      1. Repulsive, repugnant to God
      2. Detestable practice of neighboring land Ammon
      3. King Solomon raised up an idol to Molech
      4. Lots of beating of the drum to drown out the noise of the crying babies
      5. Child sacrifice was common in ancient cultures
      6. Carthage (North Africa) archeologists have found bones of thousands of children from infants to age four
      7. They thought they would get wealth, prosperity, and pleasure by sacrificing their children to those gods
      8. Today abortion mirrors this child sacrifice
      9. The egg of a bald eagle and pregnant lobsters are protected, but babies in the womb are not
    8. Be holy
      1. Holy in Hebrew is qodesh
      2. Do you sanctify yourself or does the Lord sanctify you?
        1. Both
        2. You have been sanctified (see 1 Corinthians 6:11)
        3. There is a difference between positional sanctification and practical sanctification
        4. Positional: we were sanctified by the blood of Jesus
        5. Practical: we still have some old crud/habits to let go of
        6. There is a theological divider along these lines
          1.  John Wesley taught that you could attain sinless perfection
          2. The truth is we won't be perfect until we get to heaven
          3. God looks at us through the blood of Jesus
            1. Cooperate, "Work out your own salvation" Philippians 2:12
            2. Turn from your old ways, turn to the Lord (see 1 Peter 3:11)
    9. Cursing your parents
      1. Not the outburst of an upset teenager
      2. To harm your parents by occult means
      3. In the last days children will be disobedient to their parents (see 2 Timothy 3:2)
      4. In America every year, greater than 8 million serious assaults by children on their parents are committed
      5. High profile case in the 80s; it was discovered that the child was exploring occult practices, dark powers
    10. Capital punishment
      1. Highly debated, we're not going to solve that tonight
      2. We should love all people
        1. There is hope for anyone who's done anything
        2. Goal is restoration, salvation
      3. We should also have justice
        1. Focus should be on the victim
        2. It is their rights that have been violated
      4. Is this just Old Testament? Surely New Testament is all about love and forgiveness?
        1. Paul was arrested (see Acts 21-25)
        2. They were trying to rig it so they could kill him
        3. He admitted that he should die if he had done anything worthy of the death penalty
  3. Requirements of those privileged to serve in the priesthood
    1. The priesthood of Israel was not God's original intention
      1. He intended that the whole nation have a relationship with Him—everyone would be priests
      2. If you will obey, you shall be a special treasure, a kingdom of priests and a holy nation (see Exodus 19:5-6)
      3. What happened? Idolatry spoiled
      4. Tribe of Levi
    2. The standards for priests are higher than the standards for the people
      1. The priest is the link between God and man
      2. Two men arrested for committing a crime; one a lawyer, one a dropout; the lawyer was held to a high standard
    3. In the New Testament we are a holy priesthood
      1. You are a chosen generation (see 1 Peter 2:9)
      2. We can go directly to God
        1. Skip's mom hoped that he would become a Catholic priest
        2. Any one of us can have direct access to Jesus, we don't have to go through a human
    4. Stricter separation for the priest
      1. Similar, more stringent set of requirement in the New Testament
        1. It's a good work but it's a dangerous work (see 1 Timothy 3:1-7)
        2. James says that the teachers will receive the stricter judgment (see James 3:1)
      2. You become a dedicated target of the enemy
      3. Statistics show that 1600 ministers per month quit
        1. Pressure to have the perfect family
        2. Discouraged by other people
        3. Tired of dealing with complaints
        4. Stringent set of responsibilities
        5. Observed/under the microscope/fish-bowl syndrome
        6. Charles Spurgeon and Chuck Smith both said, "If you can be happy doing anything else, do it"
          1. Chuck Smith would often try to discourage young pastors
          2. If he can be discouraged, he shouldn't be in the ministry
    5. To tear the clothes was a sign of grief
      1. Joshua and Caleb, after they spied out the land, tore their clothes at the statement that caused unbelief to sweep over the children of Israel (see Numbers 14:6)
      2. Ezra tore his clothes when he found out about intermarriage with pagan cultures (see Ezra 9)
      3. The high priest was not to show violence
      4. In the New Testament, a minister was not to be given to violence (see Titus 1:7)
      5. Caiaphas violated this (see Matthew 26:65)


Hebrew terms: קֹ֫דֶשׁ; holy
Figures referenced: Billy Graham, Mark Twain, Justin Martyr, John Wesley, Charles Spurgeon, Chuck Smith
Cross references: Genesis 9:6, Exodus 19:5-6, Numbers 14:6, Ezra 9, Amos 9, Matthew 13, 22:39, 26:65, Acts 21-25, 1 Corinthians 6:11, 2 Corinthians 6:14-17, Philippians 2:12, 3:20, 1 Timothy 3:1-7, 5:22, 2 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:7, Hebrews 13:2, James 3:1, 1 Peter 2:9, 12, 3:11, 1 John 3:15

Topic: holiness

Keywords: law, punishment, moral, ceremony, God, set apart, holy, different

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 21:13-22:33
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 21:13-22:33
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2448

MESSAGE SUMMARY
The priesthood is not a trivial thing. In this text, the expectations for the priests' conduct is laid out. Just as the sacrifices brought to the Lord were to be perfect—without blemish—the priest was to be perfect in conduct and ability. God prescribes the worship that He requires—worship that is pleasing to Him.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 22-23
PREVIEW: In Leviticus 22-23, instructions continue about the priests' conduct and Israel's annual feasts are outlined.

Leviticus Outline:
Regulations for Conduct of Priests – Read Leviticus 22:1-16
Offerings Accepted and Not Accepted - Read Leviticus 22:17-33
Feasts of the Lord – Read Leviticus 23:1-2
The Sabbath - Read Leviticus 23:3
The Passover and Unleavened Bread - Read Leviticus 23:4-8
The Feast of Firstfruits - Read Leviticus 23:9-14
The Feast of Weeks - Read Leviticus 23:15-22
The Feast of Trumpets - Read Leviticus 23:23-25
The Day of Atonement - Read Leviticus 23:26-32
The Feast of Tabernacles - Read Leviticus 23:33-44

Regulations for Conduct of Priests – Read Leviticus 22:1-16

1. Service to the Lord was a holy vocation; the Tabernacle and all its furniture and implements were to be considered holy because they were anointed with oil (see Exodus 40:9). When was a priest (who also was anointed for service and considered holy) not to approach the holy things which the children of Israel dedicate to the Lord (vv. 1-3)?





2. What defilements are listed that would make a priest unclean and keep him from serving (vv. 4-6)?





3. What were the priests excluded from while they had uncleanness upon them (v. 3)?





4. What was a defiled priest restricted from doing (v. 4)?





5. A priest who touched anything that was unclean was considered unclean until when (v. 7)? What two things did he have to do in order to be made clean again (v. 6)?





6. What was critical for the priest to know and do? Why (v. 9)?





7. The offerings of animals sacrificed to God in the Tabernacle were considered holy and were also provision for the priests. In addition to the priest himself who was allowed to eat of this food (v.11-13)? Who was not allowed to eat it (v. 10-12)?




Offerings Accepted and Not Accepted - Read Leviticus 22:17-33

8. What two characteristics were required of an animal sacrificed for a vow or freewill burnt offering (v. 17-20)?





9. What imperfections are listed that would disqualify an animal from being offered as a freewill offering (v. 21-25)?





10. When and how was a sacrifice of thanksgiving to be offered (v. 29)? When could you eat your offering of thanksgiving (v.30)?





Feasts of the Lord – Read Leviticus 23:1-2

11. A convocation is a meeting, an assembling of God’s people. Whose feasts were the feasts declared to be (v. 2)? How were the convocations described (v. 2)?





The Sabbath - Read Leviticus 23:3

12. The Sabbath was considered a holy convocation of the Lord. What was to be done on the Sabbath (v. 3)? What was not to be done (v. 3)?






The Passover and Unleavened Bread - Read Leviticus 23:4-8

13. Passover, celebrated on the fourteenth day of the first month, was a commemoration of what event? (See Exodus 12.)






14. The Feast of Unleavened Bread, celebrated on the fifteenth day of the first month, was to commemorate what event? (See Exodus 12:17-20.)





15. What were they to do and not do on the first and seventh days of the Feasts of Passover and Unleavened Bread (vv.7-8)? What were they to do each of the seven days (v. 8)?





The Feast of Firstfruits - Read Leviticus 23:9-14

16. When was the Feast of Firstfruits commemorated (v. 11)?






17. What was waved on the Feast of Firstfruits (vv. 10-11)?






18. What was offered on the Feast of Firstfruits (v. 12-13)?





19. What did the Feast of Firstfruits foreshadow? (see 1 Corinthians 15:20)





The Feast of Weeks - Read Leviticus 23:15-22

20. How long after the Feast of Unleavened bread was the Feast of Weeks to be commemorated (vv. 15-16)?





21. What was offered by the people from their dwellings during the Feast of Weeks? What was included within the items that were offered (v. 17)?





22. What was offered by the priests during the Feast of Weeks (vv. 18-19)?





23. What did the Feast of Weeks foreshadow? (See Acts 2:1-4.)





The Feast of Trumpets - Read Leviticus 23:23-25

24. What was done on the Feast of Trumpets that differentiated it from the other feasts (v. 24)?






The Day of Atonement - Read Leviticus 23:26-32

25. What were the people to do to themselves on the Day of Atonement (v. 27)? What were they not to do on that day (v. 28)?





The Feast of Tabernacles - Read Leviticus 23:33-44

26. In addition to being a holy convocation and not working (v. 35) and making an offering by fire (v. 36) what were the children of Israel to do on the Feast of Tabernacles (vv. 40-43)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Warning: this is not your typical church service
      1. It's a Bible study
        1. Study of the Bible includes every text
        2. God's curriculum
      2. Jesus said, "You err, not knowing the Scriptures nor the power of God" (Matthew 22:29
      3. The power of God is tied to the principles of God found in His Word
        1. Every Christian believer should have a working knowledge of the Scripture; that takes time
        2. Recommend a lifetime of reading the Bible daily
        3. Through the Bible in a year, over and over again until you go to heaven
    2. Serving is the natural progression after you are saved
      1. Saved, grow, serve
      2. Skip began serving by leading worship
        1. That led to home Bible studies
        2. Desire to serve the Lord more
          1. Was driving home and saw a space with sign "Available Now"
          2. Had been praying for what the Lord would have him do
          3. The Lord said "Just be available now"
          4. When he got home, walked down to the beach, climbed the  lifeguard tower and said to the Lord, "I'm available now"
          5. Under the tower there was a Cheeto-eating man
          6. Skip led him to Christ
          7. Instead of dreaming so far ahead of the game, just serve, be available now, right where you're at
          8. Leading a person to Christ is the greatest experience
            1. Skip was on a high
            2. He had a confidence in the Lord
      3. From there, Skip felt called to go East
        1. Married Lenya
        2. Moved to Albuquerque
        3. Started a home Bible study
      4. Skip shares this story in Shepherd School, "Your success as a pastor in the future is directly proportional to three things:"
        1. Your passion to learn
        2. You need the power to serve; gift of teaching
        3. A partner to share; someone called as you are
          1. A man felt called to the Philippines; his wife did not feel called—she did not want to go at all
          2. This is a yellow light
          3. Until she senses the call, don't go
  2. For the priest to serve he had to have a stringent accountability—the priest's private life had to be a pure life
    1. His wife's life had to be a pure life so there would never be any question about the future priest's right to serve in the priesthood
    2. In the New Testament, a wife is a partner with the husband
      1. Paul gives a list of stipulations for those in ministry (see 1 Timothy 3:1-13)
      2. In service they have to have a higher level of responsibility
      3. A one-woman man
      4. Many pastor's wives feel left out because of their husband's business
        1. Ministry widows
        2. I had this discussion early in our marriage
        3. Be devoted to your partner as you serve the Lord
    3. God wanted a high degree of quality—12 physical abnormalities are listed
      1. Intertestamental period
        1. 40 BC Antigonus had the ears of the high priest cut off
        2. He wanted to make sure that Hyrcanus II was forever disqualified from the priesthood
      2. Animals had to be without blemish, and so did the priest
        1. Visible things exert a strong impression on people's minds
          1. God wanted the people to see the priest as capable and whole
          2. A defect did not bar the person from eating at the priest's table
        2. It is not a judgment on the person's worth or dignity
        3. Simply a matter for sacrificial/ceremonial purposes
          1. Being a priest was hard physically
          2. Lift animals, you had to have physical strength
          3. The ability to see and hear
          4. In the New Testament, there's nothing to keep anyone from serving
          5. We all have some handicap—certain things we're not good at
            1. But we each have a gift or set of gifts of the Holy Spirit
            2. Discover how you are gifted naturally and supernaturally
            3. Function in those gifts
          6. Charles Spurgeon speaks about the voice of the minister in Lectures to My Students
          7. Both the lamb and the priest had to be perfect; they both speak of Jesus Christ
            1. Jesus is the perfect high priest; He said, "I always do those things that please the Father" (see John 8:29)
            2. He is the perfect sacrifice (see 1 Peter 1:19)
        4. In the New Testament, physical perfection is not a requirement; moral and spiritual maturity are (see 1 Timothy 3:1-13)
    4. Any priests who wanted to minister to the Lord could not do it in a haphazard or sloppy manner
      1. Purest of qualifications; don't treat sacred things as common things
        1. A constant evaluation
          1. Am I fit?
          2. Am I clean?
          3. Am I unclean?
          4. Have I touched anything that would keep me from ministering?
        2. Principle: Judge ourselves then God doesn't have to chasten us (see 1 Corinthians 11:31-32)
      2. The private life of the priest must match his public service
      3. Divine chastisement—death by the hand of heaven (v. 22:9)
        1. If you don't do it right, God may kill you
        2. Nadab and Abihu (see Leviticus 10)
        3. Korah and company (see Numbers 16)
        4. Eli has two corrupt sons and he doesn't correct them; "They were corrupt and they did not know the Lord" (see 1 Samuel 2)
        5. In the New Testament:
          1. Ananias and Saphira lied to God (see Acts 5)
          2. Communion table (see 1 Corinthians 11:30)
          3. Early church discipline (see Matthew 18:15-17)
          4. "Deliver such a one to Satan for the destruction of the flesh, that his spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord Jesus" (1 Corinthians 5:5)
            1. Not condemned to hell
            2. An act of divine mercy
            3. Destroy the flesh so they don't continue to sin
      4. Slavery in the Bible; indentured servant
        1. Treated like a family member
        2. Lovely how God took care of them
      5. Eating the holy offering
    5. Transcendent principle: The worship that is acceptable to God is the worship that God prescribes
      1. This principle is found in the Old Testament and the New Testament
      2. "The Father is looking for those who will worship Him in spirit and in truth" (John 4:24)
    6. Jewish Rabbis took 22:17-20 as a principle to include all of the things used in temple worship
      1. Oil
      2. Wine
      3. Flour
      4. Wood
      5. All the best ingredients because the Lord deserves the best
      6. The children of Israel failed at these verses when they didn't honor or revere God (see Malachi 1:6-8)
        1. They were living far from God
        2. They were giving their castoffs to the Lord
        3. "Having a form of godliness" (see 2 Timothy 3:5)
        4. We often give our castoffs; why not give the best?
        5. Jewish Rabbis had a tradition: any gift for charity should always be the best
      7. It's not about the amount, it's about the heart
        1. There has to be some sacrifice in our giving
        2. When David was looking to build a house for God, he said, "I will not sacrifice to the Lord that which cost me nothing" (1 Chronicles 21:24)
        3. In the New Testament, there is no specified amount; "God loves a cheerful giver" (see 2 Corinthians 9:7)
        4. Tenderness in God toward His creatures
          1. Respect of nature
          2. A reverence for the natural order
          3. Similar references in Exodus 23:19, Deuteronomy 20:19 and Deuteronomy 22:6-7
          4. We are stewards of God's creation
            1. Should we protect the environment?
            2. It's a gift of God
            3. Should be concerned
            4. Should not worship it
        5. Offer it of your own free will
          1. Not because you have to but because you want to
          2. Jesus came and offered His life because He wanted to (see Hebrews 12:2)
        6. Israel's Bible in little 22:32
          1. Two principles
          2. A warning to not profane God's name; chalal shem in Hebrew
          3. Make holy God's name; qodesh shem
      8. Principle: All of my life should be guarded
        1. Nothing tarnishes the name of God
        2. What I do and say proclaims, enhances, and enlarges His reputation
        3. It's what Paul meant in Philippians when he spoke of magnifying the Lord (see Philippians 1:20)
        4. How can you magnify the Lord in your body?
          1. To most God is small and aloof
          2. You show them God through your life
          3. Bring Him into focus for them
        5. It's the same principle Paul spoke of when he talked about the fragrance of Christ (see 2 Corinthians 2:15)
        6. Ancient Rabbis said: "The Jew should remember that the glory of God is entrusted to his care. A single Jew's offense can bring shame on the whole house of Israel."
          1. A single Christian's offense can bring shame on the whole church of God
          2. If one member suffers, we all suffer (see 1 Corinthians 12:26)
        7. Christ is honored when we magnify him


Hebrew terms: חַלֵּ֖ל שֵׁם; chalal shem, pierce, name, profane the name of God; קֹ֫דֶשׁ שֵׁם; holy, name, to make holy God's name
Publications referenced: Lectures to My Students, by Charles Spurgeon
Figures referenced: Antigonus
Cross references: Exodus 23:19, Leviticus 10, Numbers 16, Deuteronomy 20:19, Deuteronomy 22:6-7, 1 Samuel 2, 1 Chronicles 21:24, Malachi 1:6-8, Matthew 18:15-17, 22:29, John 4:24, 8:29, Acts 5, 1 Corinthians 5:5, 1 Corinthians 11:30-32, 1 Corinthians 12:26, 2 Corinthians 2:15, 9:7, Philippians 1:20, 1 Timothy 3:1-13, 2 Timothy 3:5, Hebrews 12:2, 1 Peter 1:19

Topic: Priesthood

Keywords: priest, expectations, rules, holy, God, pastor, worship

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 23
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 23
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2451

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Charles H. Spurgeon once said, "Our happy God should be worshipped by happy people; a cheerful spirit is in keeping with His nature." In this text, we consider the festivals and feasts prescribed for the people to celebrate and publicly worship God throughout the year. The Sabbath was a weekly observance; it was a gift of rest for God's people. Passover commemorated the deliverance from Egypt; and it was prophetic of future deliverance through Jesus Christ. These feasts were special times set aside to remember God—to rejoice in His provision and His care.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 24-25
PREVIEW: In Leviticus 24-25, we learn about the penalty for blasphemy from the second of two narratives contained in Leviticus, and we discover all the implications of the Year of Jubilee.

Leviticus Outline:
Care of the Tabernacle Lamps – Read Leviticus 24:1-4
The Bread of the Tabernacle – Read Leviticus 24:5-9
The Penalty for Blasphemy – Read Leviticus 24:10-23
The Sabbath of the Seventh Year – Read Leviticus 25:1-7
The Year of Jubilee – Read Leviticus 25:8-17
Provisions for the Seventh Year – Read Leviticus 25:18-22
Redemption of Property – Read Leviticus 25:23-34
Lending to the Poor – Read Leviticus 25:35-38
The Law Concerning Slavery – Read Leviticus 25:39-55


Care of the Tabernacle Lamps – Read Leviticus 24:1-4

1. Who was in charge of ensuring that the lamps burned continually (v. 3)?





2. What were the lamps constructed of, and what was the substance that burned in them (vv. 1-4)?




3. Who was responsible for providing the substance that burned in the lamps (v. 2)?

The Bread of the Tabernacle – Read Leviticus 24:5-9

4. How many loaves of bread were baked for the Tabernacle, and where and how were they placed (vv. 5-6)?


5. Who was allowed to eat the bread of the Tabernacle, and where were they restricted to eating it (v. 9)? (See also 1 Samuel 21:4-6 and Matthew 12:3-4.)

The Penalty for Blasphemy – Read Leviticus 24:10-23

6. There are only two narrative sections in Leviticus, and both of them relate acts of blasphemy that lead to death. The first narrative is about Nadab and Abihu in Chapter 10. Who is the second narrative about (v. 10)?


7. What did this person do in this narrative (vv. 10-11)?


8. What was initially done to this person and why (v. 12)? (See also Numbers 15:34.)



9. What final judgment was passed upon this person (vv. 13-14, 23)?


10. What ordinances were put into place to govern what this person did (vv. 15-16)?


11. Why is a man who kills another man to be put to death (v. 17)? (See also Genesis 9:6, Exodus 21:12, Numbers 35:30-31, and Deuteronomy 19:11-12.)


12. What is required of a man who kills an animal belonging to another (vv. 18, 21)?


13. What is required of a man who causes disfigurement to his neighbor (vv. 19-20)? (See also Exodus 21:23–25 and Deuteronomy 19:21.)

The Sabbath of the Seventh Year – Read Leviticus 25:1-7

14. Every seven years the children of Israel were to let the land rest. What were they not allowed to do during the seventh year (vv. 4-5)?




15. Although they were to let the land rest (v. 4), the food that grew of its own accord could be eaten. Who could eat it (vv. 6-7)?


16. During this seventh year, what two other things were the children of Israel required to do? (See Deuteronomy 15:1–2 and 31:9–13.)

The Year of Jubilee – Read Leviticus 25:8-17

17. How often did the Year of Jubilee occur (vv. 8, 10)?


18. What did the children of Israel do differently on the Day of Atonement during the Year of Jubilee (vv. 9-10)?


19. How was the Year of Jubilee the determining factor in the purchase price of land (vv. 14-16)?

Provisions for the Seventh Year – Read Leviticus 25:18-22

20. What was the expectation of the children of Israel in order for them to live safely in the land and for the land to yield its fruit (vv. 18-19)?




21. If the children of Israel were to ask the question, “What shall we eat in the seventh year, since we shall not sow nor gather in our produce?” what would be God’s answer (v. 21)?

Redemption of Property – Read Leviticus 25:23-34

22. Why couldn’t a portion of the land of Israel be sold permanently (vv. 23-24)?


23. If a man became poor and sold his land, what three ways existed for him to rightfully get his land back (vv. 25-28)?


24. How and when could a house sold within a walled city be redeemed (vv. 29-30)?


25. How and when could the home of a Levite be redeemed (v. 33)?

Lending to the Poor – Read Leviticus 25:35-38

26. Usury is the sum paid for the use of money, or interest. From whom could the children of Israel take no usury (vv. 35-37)?



27. How were the children of Israel to help a fellow Israelite if he became poor (vv. 35-37)?

The Law Concerning Slavery – Read Leviticus 25:39-55

28. How were the children of Israel to treat a fellow Israelite if they became poor and sold themselves into slavery (vv. 39-40)?


29. The children of Israel were allowed to own slaves. Who could they own as a slave (v. 44)?


30. If a slave that was owned by one of the children of Israel had children, what became of those children (vv. 45-46)?


31. If an Israelite became poor and sold himself into slavery, how could he be redeemed out of slavery (vv. 47-49)?


32. If that Israelite wanted to obtain redemption from slavery, how would he determine the price of his release (vv. 50-52)?


33. Why were Israelites who sold themselves into slavery released in the Year of Jubilee (vv. 54-55)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Your conversion story
      1. Everybody has a story
      2. Hardship
      3. Trial
      4. Need for the Lord not known until that trial came
    2. Skip's conversion story
      1. Young
        1. Hadn't suffered a lot
        2. Christian band showed up at high school and shared their faith through song
        3. They were playing Skip's kind of music—a musical language that he could understand
        4. Previous church experience had been austere, solemn, and boring
        5. This was a happy celebration full of joy
      2. Joined a church
        1. Asked to be part of the worship team
        2. Loved the idea of celebratory music to speak about the Lord
    3. Festivals of the Lord
      1. God's save-the-dates, where the people were to honor and celebrate God
      2. In the New Testament, there are no save-the-dates; they were only directed to keep Communion often
      3. Males had to go to Jerusalem for Passover, Pentecost, and Tabernacles
    4. Of historical note
      1. Israel observed the lunar calendar; 354.3 days in a year
      2. Egyptians also had a lunar calendar
      3. Mesopotamian calendar similar
      4. All these calendars required them to make up days; every few years they added a month
  2. The Lord's Feasts
    1. Sabbath, speaks of rest
      1. Weekly observance
      2. Predates the giving of the law of Moses
      3. Israel's week builds to Sabbath
        1. Friday afternoon
        2. Dress nicer for Friday evening meal
        3. Gift given
        4. Husband buys flowers for his wife
        5. Beautiful celebration
      4. God gave the gift of the Sabbath to the people for rest
      5. Sabbath became a burden by the New Testament times; 39 activities prohibited on the Sabbath
        1. They lost the idea that it was for rest
        2. 24 chapters in the Talmud were devoted to Sabbath law
        3. Jesus Christ said that the Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath; and He claimed to be Lord of the Sabbath (see Mark 2:27 and Matthew 12:8)
      6. Sunday is not the Sabbath nor the Christian Sabbath
        1. It's the first day of the week
        2. New covenant, days don't matter (see Romans 14:5)
        3. Worship God every single day of the week
    2. Passover speaks of redemption
      1. The children of Israel delivered from bondage by the mighty hand of God
      2. Passover was the last plague in Egypt when all the Egyptian firstborn died (see Exodus 12)
        1. The Israelites killed a lamb and sprinkled its blood on the door post
        2. Roasted the lamb and sat for a Seder meal
          1. A very ordered event
          2. A family event
      3. Two roles
        1. Commemorative past deliverance
        2. Predictive of future deliverance
        3. Our Communion is tied to the Passover
          1. Jesus died on Passover
          2. "Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world" (John 1:29)
          3. Every time you take Communion you are showing the Lord's death until He comes
          4. You are looking forward to His return, His reign
          5. You die for your own sin, or the Lamb dies for your sin
    3. The feast of Unleavened Bread speaks of recuperation
      1. Left Egypt in a hurry
        1. They didn't have time to bake bread with leaven
        2. There's no need to rush anymore
      2. Passover day begins the first day of the seven-day feast of Unleavened Bread
      3. Picture of spiritual recuperation
        1. Restoration
        2. Building up
        3. Wickedness removed
        4. "So let us celebrate the festival, not by eating the old bread of wickedness and evil, but by eating the new bread of purity and truth" (1 Corinthians 5:8)
        5. Just as there was no gap between Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread; there is no gap between your redemption in Christ and Him sanctifying you
    4. Feast of First fruits speaks representation
      1. Beginning of the barley harvest
        1. Early spring
        2. Wave the first of the harvest before God
        3. Represented that there was more to follow; trust and belief that there would be an abundant harvest
        4. Celebration of joy; exuberant
        5. Representation of resurrection (see 1 Corinthians 15:20)
        6. His resurrection requires ours, just as first fruits require harvest
      2. Pentecost marked the end of the wheat harvest
        1. Known as shabua—feast of weeks
        2. End of spring—50 days after Passover
        3. Jewish tradition: Moses received the law on this day
          1. Today it is customary for the observant Jew to stay up the entire nights of shabua discussing the Torah
          2. Symbolizes vigilance
        4. Bread baked with leaven
        5. New Testament church was birthed on Pentecost
          1. Two loaves of bread baked with leaven
          2. Symbolic of Jew and Gentile being brought together
          3. We are all one in Christ (see Galatians 3:28)
    5. After Pentecost, there is a long gap
      1. Four months with no feasts
      2. Many conservative theologians believe this is a picture of the church age
      3. Has God forsaken Israel? (see Romans 11:1)
    6. Feast of Trumpets, reminder
      1. Seventh month; emphasis on seven
      2. Trumpet sound reminds you of something very solemn is coming
      3. Ten days of self-examination
      4. Two silver trumpets blown first day of every month (see Numbers 10)
      5. Now we have the blowing of the trumpet reminding them that the Day of Atonement is coming; get ready
      6. Next ten days called Yamim Nora'im, days of awe or days of repentance
        1. Two calendars—religious and civil
        2. Nisan is the first month and begins the religious year (see Exodus 12:2)
        3. After they come back from captivity, though it's the seventh month, the first day is called Rosh Hashanah, New Year
        4. First month of the civil year; called Tishri
      7. In Isaiah 27 he predicts re-gathering of Israel by blowing of the trumpet
      8. Ezekiel gives more information (see Ezekiel 37 and 39)
      9. Trumpet will call believers to meet the Lord in the air (see 1 Thessalonians 4:17)
        1. 70th week of Daniel (see Daniel 9:25-27)
        2. Seven-year period
        3. God deals with the world
        4. God deals with His people, the Jewish nation, to recover them—restore them back to covenant relationship where they trust in Jesus as the Messiah
    7. Day of Atonement speaks of repentance
      1. Yom Kippur, means the day of covering
      2. Afflict your souls
        1. Deny yourself
        2. Time of fasting
      3. Solemn feast
      4. Scapegoat
        1. Fasting turned to feasting after the scapegoat is gone
        2. Singing and dancing
      5. This will be fulfilled in the tribulation—that 70th week of Daniel
        1. In the future they will re-gather in the land
        2. The people were already restored to their land in 1948
        3. Restored to the Lord
        4. They will look on Him whom they have pierced (see Zechariah 12:10 and John 19:37)
    8. Feast of Tabernacles, relocation
      1. Protected and provided for in the wilderness
      2. Sukkah, booths—temporary huts
      3. A whole week of camping out to remind them of the children of Israel were provided during their time in the desert
      4. The Jews were celebrating this feast when Jesus said, "If any man thirst" (see John 7:37)
        1. Priest raised the pitcher and poured water
        2. In unison, they quoted Isaiah 12:3, "With joy you will draw water from the wells of salvation"
        3. On the eighth day of the feast, the priest did that twice
      5. What does this feast have to do with the future?
        1. After Jesus returns, we will celebrate in the Millennial Kingdom (see Zechariah 14)
        2. Israel will dwell securely for 1,000 years
        3. Fulfills and completes the prophetic progression to the feasts
  3. Closing
    1. Rejoice before the Lord
      1. A command to be happy
      2. We all go through hardships and heartaches
      3. Deliberately say, "Lord, You are worth me celebrating You."
      4. Some church people can be very serious
      5. 18 times in the Psalms we're commanded to "make a joyful shout to the Lord"
      6. Charles H. Spurgeon said, "Our happy God should be worshipped by happy people; a cheerful spirit is in keeping with His nature"
      7. Happy hour at church
    2. Communion
      1. Ties us to the Passover
      2. Commemorative
      3. Celebrative
      4. Predictive



Hebrew terms: שָׁבֻעֹת֙; shabua, weeks; Yamim Nora'im, days of awe; Rosh Hashanah, Jewish new year; Tishri, the first month of the civil year; י֥וֹם הַכִּפֻּרִ֣ים; Yom Kippur, day of atonement; בַּסֻּכֹּ֥ת; sukkah, booths
Figures referenced: Charles H. Spurgeon
Cross references: Exodus 12, Numbers 10,
Isaiah 12:3, Isaiah 27, Ezekiel 37, Ezekiel 39, Daniel 9:25-27, Zechariah 12:10, Zechariah  14, Matthew 12:8, Mark 2:27, John 1:29, John 7:37, John 19:37, Romans 11:1, Romans 14:5, 1 Corinthians 15:20, Galatians 3:28, 1 Thessalonians 4:17

Topic: Feasts

Keywords: Sabbath, rest, Pentecost, Tabernacles, Passover, redemption, deliverance, unleavened bread, recuperation, first fruits, represent, recognize, God, Jesus, trumpet, reminder, Atonement, repentance, Tabernacle, relocation, rejoice, celebrate, feast, remember

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 24:1-25:34
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 24:1-25:34
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2456

MESSAGE SUMMARY
God is an interactive God. He chooses you—picks you before the foundation of the earth. Then He allows you to choose Him. And, It doesn't end there: He gives you gifts that you can use to serve Him and one another. In this text we see that God provides for the priesthood through the people of Israel and learn that Jesus is our kinsman redeemer—He was related, willing, and able—to buy back the title deed to the earth.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 24-25
PREVIEW: In Leviticus 24-25, we learn about the penalty for blasphemy from the second of two narratives contained in Leviticus, and we discover all the implications of the Year of Jubilee.

Leviticus Outline:
Care of the Tabernacle Lamps – Read Leviticus 24:1-4
The Bread of the Tabernacle – Read Leviticus 24:5-9
The Penalty for Blasphemy – Read Leviticus 24:10-23
The Sabbath of the Seventh Year – Read Leviticus 25:1-7
The Year of Jubilee – Read Leviticus 25:8-17
Provisions for the Seventh Year – Read Leviticus 25:18-22
Redemption of Property – Read Leviticus 25:23-34
Lending to the Poor – Read Leviticus 25:35-38
The Law Concerning Slavery – Read Leviticus 25:39-55

Care of the Tabernacle Lamps – Read Leviticus 24:1-4
1. Who was in charge of ensuring that the lamps burned continually (v. 3)?



2. What were the lamps constructed of, and what was the substance that burned in them (vv. 1-4)?



3. Who was responsible for providing the substance that burned in the lamps (v. 2)?



The Bread of the Tabernacle – Read Leviticus 24:5-9
4. How many loaves of bread were baked for the Tabernacle, and where and how were they placed (vv. 5-6)?





5. Who was allowed to eat the bread of the Tabernacle, and where were they restricted to eating it (v. 9)? (See also 1 Samuel 21:4-6 and Matthew 12:3-4.)




The Penalty for Blasphemy – Read Leviticus 24:10-23
6. There are only two narrative sections in Leviticus, and both of them relate acts of blasphemy that lead to death. The first narrative is about Nadab and Abihu in Chapter 10. Who is the second narrative about (v. 10)?




7. What did this person do in this narrative (vv. 10-11)?



8. What was initially done to this person and why (v. 12)? (See also Numbers 15:34.)



9. What final judgment was passed upon this person (vv. 13-14, 23)?





10. What ordinances were put into place to govern what this person did (vv. 15-16)?





11. Why is a man who kills another man to be put to death (v. 17)? (See also Genesis 9:6, Exodus 21:12, Numbers 35:30-31, and Deuteronomy 19:11-12.)





12. What is required of a man who kills an animal belonging to another (vv. 18, 21)?





13. What is required of a man who causes disfigurement to his neighbor (vv. 19-20)? (See also Exodus 21:23–25 and Deuteronomy 19:21.)




The Sabbath of the Seventh Year – Read Leviticus 25:1-7
14. Every seven years the children of Israel were to let the land rest. What were they not allowed to do during the seventh year (vv. 4-5)?



15. Although they were to let the land rest (v. 4), the food that grew of its own accord could be eaten. Who could eat it (vv. 6-7)?





16. During this seventh year, what two other things were the children of Israel required to do? (See Deuteronomy 15:1–2 and 31:9–13.)




The Year of Jubilee – Read Leviticus 25:8-17
17. How often did the Year of Jubilee occur (vv. 8, 10)?




18. What did the children of Israel do differently on the Day of Atonement during the Year of Jubilee (vv. 9-10)?




19. How was the Year of Jubilee the determining factor in the purchase price of land (vv. 14-16)?




Provisions for the Seventh Year – Read Leviticus 25:18-22
20. What was the expectation of the children of Israel in order for them to live safely in the land and for the land to yield its fruit (vv. 18-19)?



21. If the children of Israel were to ask the question, “What shall we eat in the seventh year, since we shall not sow nor gather in our produce?” what would be God’s answer (v. 21)?




Redemption of Property – Read Leviticus 25:23-34
22. Why couldn’t a portion of the land of Israel be sold permanently (vv. 23-24)?





23. If a man became poor and sold his land, what three ways existed for him to rightfully get his land back (vv. 25-28)?





24. How and when could a house sold within a walled city be redeemed (vv. 29-30)?





25. How and when could the home of a Levite be redeemed (v. 33)?




Lending to the Poor – Read Leviticus 25:35-38
26. Usury is the sum paid for the use of money, or interest. From whom could the children of Israel take no usury (vv. 35-37)?



27. How were the children of Israel to help a fellow Israelite if he became poor (vv. 35-37)?




The Law Concerning Slavery – Read Leviticus 25:39-55
28. How were the children of Israel to treat a fellow Israelite if they became poor and sold themselves into slavery (vv. 39-40)?





29. The children of Israel were allowed to own slaves. Who could they own as a slave (v. 44)?





30. If a slave that was owned by one of the children of Israel had children, what became of those children (vv. 45-46)?




31. If an Israelite became poor and sold himself into slavery, how could he be redeemed out of slavery (vv. 47-49)?





32. If that Israelite wanted to obtain redemption from slavery, how would he determine the price of his release (vv. 50-52)?





33. Why were Israelites who sold themselves into slavery released in the Year of Jubilee (vv. 54-55)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. God is an interactive God
      1. He chooses you before you're born
      2. Allows you to make a decision for Him
      3. He gives gifts (see 1 Peter 4:10 and 1 Corinthians 12)
      4. He allows us to engage or not
      5. Your words and actions are how God uses you
    2. God provided for the priesthood through the people
      1. God could have miraculously provided
      2. He doesn't need us (see Acts 17:24-26)
      3. He allows us to participate
  2. The tabernacle
    1. The high priest performed his duties in a little room—the holy place
      1. The high priest alone maintained the lamp stand
      2. Picture of Jesus Christ: Jesus Christ is our great High Priest
        1. "Seeing then that we have a great High Priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we do not have a High Priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but was in all points tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly to the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need" (Hebrews 4:14-16)
        2. In Revelation 2 and 3, John sees Jesus the High Priest walking in the midst of the seven golden lamp stands
        3. The lamp stand was the one and only source of light
        4. Jesus said, "I am the light of the world" (John 8:12)
        5. Only one table that had bread
        6. Jesus said, "I am the bread of life" (John 6:35)
        7. Only one entrance into the tabernacle—one approach to God
        8. Jesus said, "I am the way" (John 14:6)
        9. All of the I am statements of Jesus can be traced back to the wilderness experience of the tabernacle
    2. The bread of the tabernacle
      1. Fine flour with frankincense sprinkled on top
      2. Frankincense was also used on the altar of incense
        1. Beautiful picture of our prayer life
        2. Our prayers go up like incense to the Lord (see Psalm 141:2)
        3. God loves to hear from you
        4. Parents never get tired of their kids calling or talking to them
      3. Only the priest could eat it
        1. David ate the bread when running from King Saul (see 1 Samuel 21:1-9)
        2. Jesus used that as an example in Mark 2:23-28 when he and his disciples picked and ate grain on the Sabbath
        3. "The Son of Man is also Lord of the Sabbath" (Mark 2:28)
    3. A short story vv. 10
      1. A young man curses the Lord
      2. His mom was an Israelite
      3. His dad was an Egyptian
      4. In Numbers, we learn of the mixed multitude
      5. This is an example of why Paul said, "Don't be unequally yoked with an unbeliever" (see 2 Corinthians 6:14)
      6. There will be a hard road ahead, especially with your own children
      7. The Jewish person would not even speak the name of God
        1. Tetragrammaton—YHWH
        2. Simply bowed their head and said, "Hashem"—the Name
      8. Should they give this guy a break because he's part Egyptian?
        1. Skip would have cut the guy some slack—that would have been wrong
        2. We often gather together and voice our opinions—what we think; we make our decisions on our conversations, our emotions
        3. We can be so far off from the mind and will of God
        4. One law—consistency for everyone in the land
    4. Whoever kills a man shall be put to death; obviously God did not consider capital punishment murder
      1. An animal and a man have a different value in the eyes of God
      2. India "holy cow"
      3. Why does God speak of murder right after this incident of blasphemy?
      4. Blasphemy is a kind of murder
    5. Eye for eye
      1. Not about retaliation
      2. It's about restraint
      3. It's called the lex talionis: retribution—let the punishment fit the crime
        1. Eye for eye, tooth for tooth
        2. Many ancient cultures employed (i.e., The Code of Hammurabi)
      4. Human nature is never satisfied with justice
        1. God gives this law for mercy's sake
        2. Lamech's song (see Genesis 4)
  3. Special years
    1. Sabbath year
      1. Seventh year was the year of rest
      2. Seven sets of years, the fiftieth year is the Year of Jubilee
      3. Farmers cultivated the land for six years, rested the seventh year
      4. Good steward of the land; let the land rest, don't deplete it
      5. The one year that the wealthy land owner and the poorest of the poor would be on equal footing
      6. Some Christians can be very condemning about keeping the Sabbath
      7. Any spontaneous yield could be eaten by anyone—whether you owned the land or not
    2. The number seven appears a lot in Scripture
      1. God created the heavens and earth and on the seventh day He rested (see Genesis 1:1 and Genesis 2:2)
      2. Jacob worked for his uncle Laban for seven years and another seven years (see Genesis 29:15-30)
      3. Pharaoh had a dream of seven fat oxen and seven skinny oxen (see Genesis 41:1-8)
      4. Golden lamp stand with seven lamps (see Zechariah 4)
      5. Siege of Jericho lasted seven days (see Joshua 6)
      6. Seven heads for the beast (see Revelation 12:3, 13:1, 17:3, and 17:7)
      7. Seven churches (see Revelation 1:4, 11, and 20)
      8. Seven stars (see Revelation 1:16, 20, 2:1 and 3:1)
      9. Seven seals (see Revelation 5:1, 5 and Revelation 8:1)
      10. Seven trumpets (see Revelation 8:1-6 and 11:15)
      11. Seven bowl judgments (see Revelation 15:7, 16:1, 17, 17:1, and 21:9)
      12. Seven means completion
    3. Jubilee
      1. Means ram's horn; yobel
      2. Comes from the Hebrew root word Jubal, the first musician (see Genesis 4:21)
      3. Fiftieth year, the Year of Jubilee
        1. All the slaves went free
        2. All debts were canceled
        3. All the land reverted back to the person from whom it was bought
      4. The worth of the land was calculated based on the number of years until the next Jubilee
      5. One day there will be a Jubilee for us
        1. We will go free
        2. The closer we get to that day, the less the possessions of this world matter
        3. No matter your age, live close to the kingdom—real values, so that you don't get hung up on the possession
      6. There is no record in the Bible or in secular history that the children of Israel actually kept the Sabbatical year
        1. They neglected keeping that seven-year cycle for 490 years
        2. That's 70 Sabbath years the land didn't get its rest
        3. That's why the Babylonian captivity lasted 70 years (see 2 Chronicles 36:17-21 and Jeremiah 25)
        4. One scholar noted that the earliest Year of Jubilee that we have in Judaistic records is the year 1393 BC
        5. That same scholar believes that when Jesus went into the synagogue in Nazareth and opened up the scroll of Isaiah and read Isaiah 61 on a Jubilee year (AD 26-29)
        6. If so, this would have great meaning, "The spirit of the Lord God is upon Me, because the Lord has anointed Me to preach good tidings to the poor; He has sent Me to heal the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to those who are bound; to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord" (Isaiah 61:1-2)
      7. How would they eat in that seventh year? The Lord would provide
      8. There was a problem
        1. A man could lose his portion of land
        2. Depending on his age, he may never be able to regain his land before his death
        3. God made a provision to recover the land, a goel, a rich relative could redeem the land for the man
        4. He has the money, his related, he's willing to do it
        5. The book of Ruth is based on this Scripture; Boaz is the kinsman redeemer
      9. Levite provision
  4. Closing
    1. Jeremiah the prophet (see Jeremiah 32)
      1. He was put in jail
      2. He had just predicted that Israel would be taken captive by Babylon for 70 years
      3. He predicts they will be restored
      4. Cousin Hanamel requests Jeremiah be the kinsman redeemer for him
      5. As an act of faith (we will return after the captivity), Jeremiah buys the land of Hanamel
      6. Three documents (scrolls): two scrolls that were title deeds and 1 scroll that has the conditions
      7. Kinsman redeemer takes the scrolls and breaks the seals
    2. In Revelation 5, John gets a vision of God with a scroll—the title deed to the earth
      1. John wept because no one was worthy to break the seals
        1. God created earth and entrusted it to man
        2. Man turned over control of earth to Satan
        3. Satan called, the God of this world (see John 12:31 and Matthew 4:9)
      2. Then he saw a lamb as if He had been slain
        1. That's where the redemption period begins
        2. Jesus is able, willing, and he is related
          1. God became man (see John 1:14)
          2. He bought it with His blood (see Revelation 5:9)
          3. He was not murdered, He willingly laid down His life (see John 10:18)


Hebrew terms: יְהֹוָה; Yhwh, Lord; הָשֵׁם; Hashem, name; יוֹבֵל; yobel, ram's horn, jubilee, יוּבָל; Yubal, Jubal; גָּאַל; gaal (goel), to redeem, act as kinsman
Latin terms: Lex talionis: eye-for-an-eye code of justice
Publications referenced: The Code of Hammurabi
Cross references: Genesis 1:1, Genesis 2:2, Genesis 4, Genesis 29:15-30, Genesis 41:1-8, Joshua 6, Ruth, 1 Samuel 21:1-9, 2 Chronicles 36:17-21, Psalm 141:2, Isaiah 61:1-2, Jeremiah 25, Jeremiah 32, Zechariah 4, Matthew 4:9, Mark 2:23-28, John 1:14, John 6:35, John 8:12, John 10:18, John 12:31, John 14:6, Acts 17:24-26, 1 Corinthians 12, 2 Corinthians 6:14, Hebrews 4:14-16, 1 Peter 4:10, Revelation 1, Revelation 2, 3, Revelation 5, Revelation 8:1-6, Revelation 11:15, Revelation 12:3, Revelation 13:1, Revelation 15:7, Revelation 16:1, 17, Revelation 17:1, Revelation 17:3, and Revelation 17:7, Revelation 21:9


Topic: Year of Jubilee

Keywords: kinsman, Sabbath, redeem, redeemer, blasphemy, gifts, serve, High Priest, prayer, murder, capital punishment, Year of Jubilee, scroll, Revelation, Sabbatical

 


 

SERIES: 03 Leviticus - 2012
MESSAGE: Leviticus 25:35-27:34
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 25:35-27:34
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2459

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Holiness is the overwhelming theme of Leviticus: God is holy and he wants us to be holy. These final chapters of the book reveal God's heart in caring for the people and the land. We see His conditional and unconditional covenants and we understand the heart of sacrifice.

STUDY GUIDE
Leviticus 26-27
PREVIEW: In Leviticus 26-27, we learn about the promises of blessing and retribution that God makes to His children, and we discover how the valuations were set for redeeming people, animals, land, and other things dedicated to the Lord.

Leviticus Outline:
Promise of Blessing and Retribution – Read Leviticus 26:1-46
Redeeming Persons and Property Dedicated to God –
Read Leviticus 27:1-34

Promise of Blessing and Retribution – Read Leviticus 26:1-46

1. Throughout the Old Testament the children of Israel were warned not to make idols or bow down to them. Although idols are powerless in the material realm, there is a spiritual realm behind them that is dangerous. What types of idols were forbidden (v. 1)?


2. The material idol, in and of itself, is nothing. It’s simply a piece of wood or a carved stone. It has no life. It’s blind, deaf, and dumb. Read Psalm 115:4-7. How are the idols described?


3. Since idols, in and of themselves, are powerless, what is the real danger of idols that causes God to forbid them? (Read 1 Corinthians 10:19-20.)


4. What types of idols exist in our modern culture?


5. How is Leviticus 26:2 an antidote to the idolatry forbidden in verse 1? (See also Exodus 20:20, Proverbs 16:6b, Matthew 22:37, and 1 John 5:21.)


6. The little word if is one of the biggest words in meaning contained within the Bible because it is often used in conditional statements that God makes. When coupled with a then the conditions are based upon obedience to what is commanded. What is required of the children of Israel in the if/then statement given in Leviticus 26:3-4?


7. List the blessings that are promised by God to those who will perform His statutes and commandments (vv. 3-13).


8. The word but is an adversative conjunction (sometimes known as contrasting conjunction) which is a coordinating conjunction used to express comparisons or contrasts. What contrast does God begin to make in Leviticus 26:14-15?


9. Categorize and summarize the retribution that God commits to doing (v. 16) if His children do not obey Him (vv. 16-39).


10. What is God’s motive in this wide variety of retribution (vv. 23, 27-28)? (See also Proverbs 3:12 and Hebrews 12:6.)


11. Although the list of retribution is various and terrifying, there is hope. What hope is given in yet another adversative conjunction and if/then statement (vv. 40-45)?


12. How is the same hope offered to us as New Testament children of God when we are disobedient? (See 1 John 1:8-10.)

Redeeming Persons and Property Dedicated to God – Read Leviticus 27:1-34

13. A vow is an earnest promise to perform a specified act or behave in a certain manner, especially a solemn promise to live and act in accordance with the rules of a religious order. To whom is the vow being made (v. 2)?


14. Hannah made a vow to God. What was her vow? (See 1 Samuel 1:8-18.)


15. There were two ways for a person to complete their vow. One was to be redeemed from the vow by making a payment and the other was to directly fulfill the vow. The payment required was determined by the age and gender of the person being consecrated to the Lord. List the genders, ages, and valuations set by God for redeeming a person from their vow (vv. 3-7)


16. How was a person’s redemption value set if they were too poor to pay the valuation set by God (v. 8)?


17. Animals could also be consecrated unto the Lord by a vow. Who set the valuation of the animals’ value (v. 12)?


18. Substituting a good animal offered for a bad animal was not allowed. What happened to both the good and bad animals if a substitution was attempted (v. 10)?


19. Animals considered unclean (not acceptable as an offering) could be vowed unto God (v. 11). What do you think became of unclean animals that were offered as a vow?


20. Describe how a house that was dedicated to the Lord was valued and redeemed (vv. 14-15).


21. How much seed could the land produce and how many years the land could it be used until it returned to its rightful owner in the Year of Jubilee?


22. When a man dedicated to the Lord a field that he bought—a field that was not part of his tribal possession—the value was set by the priest. What became of this dedicated land in the Year of Jubilee (vv. 22-24)?


23. What was the value of the shekel of the sanctuary set at (v. 25)?


24. Why couldn’t a firstborn animal be dedicated to the Lord in a vow (v. 26)? (See also Exodus 13:2, 12, and 22:30.)


25. There were certain things that could not be redeemed; list those things (vv. 28-33).


26. “Passing under the rod” referred to the way a shepherd would hold forth his shepherd’s rod in order to count his sheep as they passed under it. What percent belonged to the Lord (v. 32)?


27. Should New Testament believers give a tithe of what belongs to them unto the LORD? (See 1 Corinthians 16:1-2.)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Disciples asked Jesus how to pray "holy is Your name" (see Luke 11:1-4)
      1. The main theme of Leviticus: The Lord is holy
        1. He is unique
        2. He is distinct
        3. He is like none other
    2. Those who follow Him should reflect Him
      1. We won't do that perfectly
      2. The moon reflects the sun, but it doesn't have the same kind of glory that the sun has
      3. Moses wanted to see God's glory; the Lord said that no man could see Him and live (see Exodus 33:18-23)
      4. Imagine people looking at your life and seeing the glory of the Lord in you
    3. The word holy or holiness appears 152 times in the book of Leviticus
    4. The third person of the Trinity is called the Holy Spirit
    5. All of Leviticus is about our worship of God and our walk before people
  2. Redemption and the sabbatical year (Leviticus 25:35-55)
    1. Treat the poor who have to be indentured servants with dignity
      1. Release in the Year of Jubilee
      2. Could be released sooner—didn't have to wait for the Year of Jubilee
      3. Based on this text and text in the New Testament, slavery
        1. About half of the people who lived in the Roman empire were slaves
        2. In the church they probably had saved slaves and saved masters
        3. What do you tell a slave master?
        4. What do you tell a slave?
        5. Why didn't God try to abolish slavery?
        6. Paul didn't lead believers to picket or petition Caesar to end slavery
        7. Rather than changing the outward institutions, God is about changing the heart
          1. Change people and you will change culture
          2. If every single believer would be vocal about their faith and lead people to Christ—eventually all would believe in Christ
          3. All of our energy and effort has to be about that
        8. Paul told the Ephesians "bondservants, be obedient to those who are your masters" (Ephesians 6:5)
          1. Many of the slave owners became believers because of this
          2. It was Christianity that was able to eventually abolish slavery
          3. In England, William Wilberforce, influenced by John Newton, succeeded in abolishing slavery; it was because of what God did in his heart
  3. Leviticus 26—the iffy chapter
    1. "If" appears nine times
      1. "I will" appears 26 times
      2. Promises God makes conditioned upon their obedience
        1. Part of the old covenant
        2. Do this and live; "The law commands, but gives us neither feet nor hands; a better law the gospel brings; it bids us fly and gives us wings" --John Bunyan
        3. The New Testament did what the old covenant never could accomplish
      3. Mosaic covenant; there are consequences
      4. We grew up with this covenant
        1. Our parents gave us positive as well as negative reinforcement
        2. For a dentist visit, mom always said, "If you're a good boy at the dentist, then we'll go to Roscoe's"
        3. If, then
        4. When Skip was 15, his parents went to Hawaii for their anniversary and they left him at home
          1. "If you pull all the weeds in the yard, then we'll get you an electric guitar"
          2. Waited until the day before they got home and mowed the weeds instead of pulling them
          3. A few days later when the weeds grew back, Skip was busted
      5. There were certain things the people had to do if they wanted God to bless them (vv. 1-13)
      6. If you disobey, then bad things will happen (vv. 14-45)
      7. Thank God for Jesus
        1. The law was a schoolmaster to lead us to Christ (see Galatians 3:24)
        2. Legalistic Christians don't get this
        3. There are those, even in our own flock, who would want to bring you back under the law
    2. No images; What about religious art? Is all of it forbidden? Is God contradicting His own command?
      1. Cherubim over the mercy seat
      2. Sewn into the veil were cherubim
      3. Sewn into the hem of the priests' robes were pomegranates
      4. In the menorah were flowers
      5. God said not to make an image (see Exodus 20:4)
      6. None of those things represented or depicted God
      7. If the image lessons God by depicting God, then it's a problem
      8. Nothing man can make can represent God
      9. Growing up, there were icons and statues around Skip's house
        1. Asked his mom about it
        2. She'd say, "It's a good reminder of God"
        3. If you need a reminder that God exists, you must not be hanging out very closely with Him—images demonstrate that you're not living close to God
    3. Blessing number one: provision in the land
      1. God will cause the rain to come down
      2. They will have abundant crops
      3. "The land...is not like the land of Egypt...[it] is a land of hills and valleys, which drinks water from the rain of heaven" (Deuteronomy 11:10-11)
      4. Israel was and is dependent on annual rainfall
        1. This year, the rain has been good
        2. The Sea of Galilee is at an all-time high
        3. A little-known fact: The city of Jerusalem has almost the same amount of annual rain as the city of London
          1. London is always cloudy with a green landscape, Jerusalem is not
          2. It's a rocky soil
          3. Most of Jerusalem's rain comes in a few-months period of time—late October and early April
          4. Early rain and latter rain
          5. Winter rain and spring rain, in Hebrew: the yoreh and malkosh
        4. Because water is scarce there, they've learned to collect the rain in cisterns
        5. The garden tomb cistern is enormous and is still in operation today
      5. This is a good deal
        1. God knows we could spend all of our energy and time providing for ourselves and our family
        2. Just make God number one and He will bless you
        3. Jesus said, "Seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you" (see Matthew 6:25-34)
        4. God wants us to be as carefree in life as possible
        5. You have to work—human cooperation that demonstrates that you believe He's going to bless you
      6. Have there been lean times?
        1. Skip in college had only bread, peanut butter, and jelly in his pantry
        2. "I have been young, and now am old; yet I have not seen the righteous forsaken, nor his descendants begging bread" (Psalms 37:25)
        3. He'll take care of you
    4. Blessing number two: peace in the land
      1. They didn't have to live in fear; God didn't want them to spend all of their time fighting
      2. God doesn't want us to spend all of our time fighting
        1. There are seasons of warfare (see 2 Samuel 11:1)
        2. You won't always be in a battle
        3. God will bring you out
        4. He does want you to have peace
      3. Is God exaggerating the truth to make a point?
        1. Gideon had 300 men against 135,000 Midianites (see Judges 7)
        2. Jonathan and his armor-bearer defeated the Philistines (see 1 Samuel 14:1-23)
        3. David faced Goliath based on this principle (see 1 Samuel 17)
        4. Martin Luther said, "One is a majority with God"
    5. Blessing number three: Partnership with God
      1. God promises to look on them favorably
      2. Literally means to turn to you and lean towards you with favor
      3. Like a couple in love
      4. Intimacy, like a young man who would propose to a young woman
      5. A beautiful idea of relating to God
      6. That's the heart of God
      7. James Dobson said "You can always tell who are the married couples in restaurants; they're the ones who don't talk to each other"
      8. Some Christians relate to God that way; a formal, once-a-week relationship
      9. The apostle John, at the Last Supper, leaned on the bosom of Jesus (see John 13:25)
    6. "I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt" (v. 13)
      1. This phrase appears 10 times in the book of Leviticus
      2. It appears over 100 times in the rest of the Old Testament
      3. God wants to remind them, "I've delivered you—never forget what you've been delivered from"
    7. The flipside, what God will do if they don't obey
      1. Arab equivalent of wasting disease is consumption—refers to tuberculosis
        1. Very common in the Middle East to this day especially among the Bedouins
        2. They get it from their camels
        3. A doctor and nurse started a hospital in the Middle East specifically to treat this disease
        4. It is now believed that there is at least one Christian or one believing family in every Bedouin tribe in the Middle East due to the evangelism that happened during their care at that hospital
      2. Reference to iron (v. 19)
        1. The first reference to iron is in Genesis 4:22
        2. This is before iron implements ever existed in Israel
        3. It was the Philistines who first perfected the art of using iron for weapons
        4. It wasn't until 1180 BC that iron became a workable product in the Middle East
        5. This was way before then
      3. Eat the flesh of your sons and daughters (v. 29)
        1. Things will become so bad, so severe, that people will be brought down to this level
        2. It has happened on many occasions
        3. In 2 Kings 6, during the siege of Samaria by King Ben-Hadad
        4. "The hands of compassionate women have cooked their own children" (Lamentations 4:10)
      4. God will not smell the fragrance (v. 31)
        1. Sounds a lot like Isaiah 1, "To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices to me?" (see Isaiah 1:11-15)
        2. Their heart wasn't right
      5. "Your land shall be desolate and your cities waste" (v. 33)
        1. Did this happen?
        2. Yes, three times
          1. 722 BC (Assyrians)
          2. 586 BC (Babylonians)
          3. AD 70 (Romans)
        3. For the last 1900 years, Israel has lived out verse 33; until May 14, 1948 when God brought them back
      6. God let the land enjoy its Sabbaths
    8. We have something awesome here
      1. All of their sin was not enough to make God forget them
      2. There are two types of covenants in the Bible
        1. Conditional
        2. Unconditional
      3. The covenant of the land—the Palestinian covenant
      4. What do you do if you have a conditional and an unconditional covenant happening simultaneously?
        1. The land is always theirs
        2. God takes them out of the land for a time
        3. God will bring them back
          1. The second time, May 14, 1948 (see Isaiah 11:11)
          2. The first time (see Daniel 9:1-19 and Jeremiah 25:8-11 and 29:10-14)
  4. Leviticus 27—the very heart of sacrifice
    1. Most of the sacrifices in Leviticus were obligatory
    2. The sacrifices in this chapter were voluntary—It's the heart that says, "I don't have to do it, I want to do it"
    3. Valuation of men, women, and children
      1. Men had a higher value because of their physical strength
      2. Hannah and Elkanah gave their son Samuel (see 1 Samuel 1)
    4. People or property could be dedicated to God
    5. True worship is voluntary, it's not forced
      1. Skip had a bad experience in a church as a new believer; tried to force him to raise his hands and speak in tongues
      2. This chapter could easily segue into Romans 12:1, "I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that you present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God, which is your reasonable service"
    6. These were laws for people who wanted to dedicate people, homes, or fields
      1. Wouldn't you want to dedicate yourself, your family, your home, your sustenance to the Lord?
      2. That's the natural progression after you are saved
    7. Tithe (vv. 27:30-32)
      1. First and only time that the word tithe is mentioned in Leviticus
      2. Tithe means 10 percent
      3. The children of Israel didn't just give a tithe
        1. There were two other tithes (see Deuteronomy 14:22-29)
        2. Totaling about 23 percent
        3. There was a third tithe to be given every three years
      4. In the New Testament it doesn't say what/how much we should tithe
        1. "Give, and it will be given to you" (Luke 6:38)
        2. Give with a joyful heart (see 2 Corinthians 9:7)
        3. Skip's personal practice, "My tithe goes to my home fellowship; my freewill offerings go to other organizations and missionaries"
  5. Closing
    1. We made it!
    2. By the time the New Testament comes around, these laws became corrupted
      1. Corban
        1. Read Mark 7 when you get home
        2. Jesus and the Pharisees have a discussion about transgressing the law
        3. Greek word Corban
        4. Religion, traditions become corrupt
      2. Examine why you do things


Hebrew terms: יוֹרֶה; yoreh, the early rain; מַלְק֔וֹשׁ; malkosh, the last rain
Greek terms: κορβᾶν; korban, corban, a gift, offering, anything consecrated to God
Figures referenced: William Wilberforce, John Newton, John Bunyan, Martin Luther, James Dobson
Cross references: Genesis 4:22, Exodus 20:4, Exodus 33:18-23, Deuteronomy 11:10-11, Deuteronomy 14:22-29, Judges 7, 1 Samuel 1, Samuel 14:1-23, 1 Samuel 17, 2 Samuel 11:1, 2 Kings 6, Psalms 37:25, Isaiah 1:11-15, Isaiah 11:11, Jeremiah 25:8-11, Jeremiah 29:10-14, Lamentations 4:10, Daniel 9:1-19, Matthew 6:25-34, Mark 7, Luke 6:38, Luke 11:1-4, John 13:25, Romans 12:1, 2 Corinthians 9:7, Galatians 3:24, Ephesians 6:5

Topic: Holy

Keywords: holy, redeem, Sabbath, gift, offering, religion, traditions, covenant, conditional, unconditional


03 Leviticus - 2012 | CalvaryABQ.org/series225
Page |