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Service Archives > 04 Numbers - 2013 > Numbers 28-29

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Numbers 28-29

Taught on | Topic: The Law | Keywords: religion, religious, festivals, feasts, sacrifices, visual, sin, atonement, animals, Passover, Communion, Sabbath, worship, lamb, unleavened bread, firstfruits, resurrection, the Law

As we study Numbers 28-29, we learn about ten sacrifices and feasts the children of Israel carried out as worship to the Lord. We can think about the enormity of their sacrifices—they sacrificed over a thousand animals every year—but God was the one who initially provided the animals for them. We should focus on the enormity of sacrifice God Himself gave—even the life of His Son.

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5/7/2014
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Numbers 28-29
Numbers 28-29
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
As we study Numbers 28-29, we learn about ten sacrifices and feasts the children of Israel carried out as worship to the Lord. We can think about the enormity of their sacrifices—they sacrificed over a thousand animals every year—but God was the one who initially provided the animals for them. We should focus on the enormity of sacrifice God Himself gave—even the life of His Son.
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04 Numbers - 2013

04 Numbers - 2013

Numbers is a book with two themes: Israel's failure and God's faithfulness. As we consider Israel's desert wanderings, we learn what can happen when people refuse to believe God's promises, and we are challenged to walk humbly with our ever-faithful Lord.

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Numbers 26-29
The Second Census of Israel—Read Numbers 26:1-65
1. A plague had smitten the children of Israel for their Baal worship at Mount Peor, which included sexual perversion (see Num. 25:1, 3, 8-9). How many Israelites died in the plague? (See Num. 25:9.)



2. After the plague, the Lord prepared to bring His children to their destination. What did the Lord ask Moses and Eleazar to do (see vv. 1-2)?



3. In previous meetings, the Lord spoke to Moses and Aaron. Why did the Lord now speak to Moses and Eleazar (see v. 1)? (See also Num. 20:22-29.)



4. The Lord instructed Moses and Eleazar to count His people because His people count to Him. An entirely new generation of the children of Israel was preparing to enter the Promised Land. Whom specifically did the Lord ask Moses and Eleazar to count (see vv. 2, 4)?


5. The tribes of the children of Israel were numbered because the older generation had died. Complete the chart below, which compares the numbers of the previous generation with the generation of fighting men that will enter the Promised Land.
Tribe First Census Count Second Census Count Difference
Reuben Numbers 1:21 46,500 Numbers 26:7 43,730 -2,770
Simeon Numbers 1:23 Numbers 26:14
Gad Numbers 1:25 Numbers 26:18
Judah Numbers 1:27 Numbers 26:22
Issachar Numbers 1:29 54,400 Numbers 26:25 64,300 +9,900
Zebulun Numbers 1:31 Numbers 26:27
Manasseh (Joseph) Numbers 1:35 Numbers 26:34
Ephraim (Joseph) Numbers 1:33 Numbers 26:37
Benjamin Numbers 1:37 Numbers 26:41
Dan Numbers 1:39 Numbers 26:43
Asher Numbers 1:41 Numbers 26:47
Naphtali Numbers 1:43 Numbers 26:50
Total: 12 Numbers 1:46 603,550 Numbers 26:51 601,730 -1,820

6. Which tribe gained the most fighting men? Which tribe lost the most men? Why might this tribe have suffered such a significant loss? (See Num. 25:9, 14-15.)



7. In the tribe of Reuben, the children of Korah, the rebel who died and took at least 253 others with him (see Num. 16:35), survived (see v. 11). Who were they? (See Ex. 6:24.) What significant role did these children perform later in their lives? (See 1 Chron.

26:19; 2 Chron. 20:19; and subtitle of Ps. 42; 87.)



8. The census was important for two logistical reasons. The first was for Israel to know the size of their army (see v. 2). Why is this important? (See also Luke 14:31-32.)



9. What was the second reason for numbering the people (see vv. 52-56)?



10. Among the twelve tribes of Israel numbered as fighting men, one tribe was not included. Which tribe was not included (see v. 57)? Why (see v. 62)? (See also Num. 1:45, 47-53; 2:5-7.)

11. The entire generation that had been counted in the first census failed to enter the Promised Land and died (see v. 64), except for three people. Who were those three (see v. 65)?


Inheritance Laws—Read Numbers 27:1-11
12. Zelophehad the son of Hepher, the son of Gilead, the son of Machir, the son of Manasseh, the son of Joseph had five daughters and no sons. These daughters had a problem. What was it (see vv. 1-4)?


13. How did these five daughters of Zelophehad handle their problem (see v. 2)?


14. The problem of the daughters of Zelophehad was not covered in the Law that had been given to Moses (see Deut. 31:24). How did Moses handle the problem (see v. 5)?


15. Like the daughters of Zelophehad, how should we handle a problem that might not be specifically addressed in the Word of God? (See Prov. 11:14; 12:15; 20:18.)


16. Like Moses, how should we handle a situation for which we do not know the biblical answer? (See Jer. 29:13; Luke 11:9-10; 2 Tim. 3:16-17; 2 Peter 1:3-4.)
17. What did the Lord afford to the five daughters of Zelophehad (see vv. 6-7)?


18. What new statute was established based upon the problem the five daughters of Zelophehad presented to Moses and Eleazar (see vv. 8-11)?


19. This exception to the Law, many interpreters argue, may have granted the daughter of Heli an inheritance in the royal line of David. Whom would this inheritance law have affected? (See Luke 3:23.)


Joshua the Next Leader of Israel—Read Numbers 27:12-23
20. Moses and Aaron had disqualified themselves from entering the land of promise when they dishonored the Lord by striking the rock at Meribah in the Wilderness of Zin (see v. 14). What mountain did the Lord tell Moses to go up to (see Deut. 32:49)? What

would Moses see there (see v. 12)?


21. The Lord told Moses that after he saw this he would be gathered to his people (see v. 13). To be gathered to his people meant that he would die and join his ancestors. Where did Moses die? Where was he buried? (See Deut. 34:5-6.) Who argued over Moses'

body after he died? (See Jude 1:9.)

22. Rather than arguing about the Lord’s decision to have him gathered to his people, Moses was concerned about the children of Israel. What did Moses ask the Lord to do for the congregation (see vv. 15-17)?


23. What was the phrase Moses used to describe his care and concern for the children of Israel (see v. 17)? Who else shared the same concern? (See Matt. 9:36; Mark 6:34; Deut. 18:15.)


24. The Lord answered Moses’ request. Who did the Lord select? How did He describe this man (see v. 18)?


25. How was Moses to inaugurate his successor (see vv. 18-20)?


26. Moses was a man with whom the Lord spoke face to face (see Ex. 33:11; Num. 12:8). How did the Lord speak to Moses’ successor (see v. 21)?


Daily Offerings—Read Numbers 28:1-8
27. The younger generation needed to be instructed on the recurring offerings that would be appropriate for the settled, agricultural way of life they would soon be living. How many lambs were offered in the daily offering? When were they offered (see vv. 1-

8)?

Sabbath Offerings—Read Numbers 28:9-10
28. In addition to the daily offering, what was offered on the Sabbath (see vv. 9-10)?


Monthly Offerings—Read Numbers 28:11-15
29. At the beginning of each month, how many animals were offered as a burnt offering (see v. 11)?


30. At the beginning of each month, how many animals were offered as a sin offering (see v. 15)?


31. What else was done at the beginning of each month? Why? (See Num. 10:10.)


Offerings at Passover—Read Numbers 28:16-25
32. On the fourteenth day of Nisan, the first month, the Passover lambs were offered. On the fifteenth day, the Feast of Unleavened Bread began. On the first and seventh day of this feast, what were the children of Israel instructed to do and to not do (see vv.

18, 25)?

33. In addition to the daily and Sabbath offerings, there were offerings for each day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread. What was offered daily that was a sweet smelling aroma to the Lord (see v. 24)?


Offerings at the Feast of Weeks—Read Numbers 28:26-31
34. On the day of firstfruits, two bulls, one ram, and seven lambs were offered as a burnt offering and a goat kid was offered to make atonement. When was the Feast of Weeks commemorated? (See Lev. 23:15-16.)


Offerings at the Feast of Trumpets—Read Numbers 29:1-6
35. In addition to the daily offerings, the New Moon offerings, a holy convocation, and not doing any customary work, what else was done on the Feast of Trumpets (see v. 1)?


Offerings on the Day of Atonement—Read Numbers 29:7-11
36. On the tenth day of the seventh month, in addition to the daily burnt offerings and the sin offering, the children of Israel offered a bull, a ram, and seven lambs, had a holy convocation, and didn’t do any customary work. What else did the children of Israel

do on the Day of Atonement (see v. 7)? (See also Ps. 35:13; Isa. 58:5.)

Offerings at the Feast of Tabernacles—Read Numbers 29:12-40
37. The Feast of Tabernacles, which lasted from the fifteenth day of the seventh month through the twenty-second day (see Lev. 23:34), required a great number of sacrifices because it celebrated the end of the yearly harvests and was an expression of

thanksgiving to God. Complete the chart below to determine how many animals were offered during this feast.
Burnt offering Sin offering
Verse Day Bulls Rams Lambs Goat
v. 13 1
v. 17 2
v. 20 3
v. 23 4
v. 26 5
v. 29 6
v. 32 7
v. 35 8
Subtotal /
Daily /
Sabbath /
Totals /


Detailed Notes

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  1. Introduction
    1. If you grew up in a solemn, religious home, as an average kid you probably didn't see a whole lot of relevance in religious expressions—there was a disconnect
    2. These two chapters are about festivals
      1. God would have feasts for His people: times of joy, remembrance, and celebration
      2. There were times of solemnity, but so often they were just to celebrate God in their daily lives; it's what He wanted from them
    3. God's commanded observances in Numbers 28-29
      1. Daily, weekly, and monthly sacrifices
      2. The great feasts
      3. There was to be a rhythm of life daily, weekly, monthly, and annually where God was at the center of their community
      4. This was God's equivalent of save the date: "Write these in your appointment calendars"
    4. All of these things were visual demonstrations
      1. In our culture, our worship is highly verbal, not visual
      2. They acted out in dramatic form some of the great truths God was trying to get through to them by these festivals
      3. It was the ancient equivalent of reality TV
    5. Why so much blood? Why so many animals killed?
      1. If you want to approach God, you've got a big problem: sin
      2. The only way to deal with sin is through atonement
        1. Vicarious atonement
        2. It means a substitute will be killed so you don't have to be killed
      3. Hebrews 9:22
      4. Either you let someone or something take your place, or you die for your own sin
    6. Leviticus 23: why does God waste pages to cover these sacrifices and offerings again?
      1. It's a new generation—they need to hear it again
      2. Every generation needs to hear the gospel; we need to be reminded of these truths
    7. These chapters talk about the occasion and what is required for the occasion
    8. We'll highlight some of these festivals—especially Passover, which Communion is based on
  2. Numbers 28
    1. The daily sacrifices (vv. 1-8)
      1. Speaks of relationship: a constant, unbroken fellowship with your Creator
      2. They began their day and ended their day focusing on a lamb; so should we
      3. Hebrews 9:26
        1. What the old covenant could never do, Jesus did once for all
        2. If you blow it, you talk to the Lamb Himself
      4. 1 John 1:9
    2. Sabbath (vv. 9-10)
      1. Speaks of rest
      2. God instituted the Sabbath for us; it was a gift to mankind
      3. It was the "maintenance law" of the Ten Commandments
        1. Exodus 20:8-11
        2. He wants you to operate at peak
      4. In Israel, the whole week builds toward the Sabbath
      5. The Sabbath, the seventh day of the week, commemorated a finished creation
        1. Sunday, the first day of the week, commemorated a finished redemption
        2. That is why the early church met on the first day of the week
      6. There's no morality attached to the commandment about the Sabbath; it has no moral component
        1. In the New Testament, all of the Ten Commandments are reiterated somewhere except for this one
        2. Are Christians commanded to keep the Sabbath? No
        3. You're free from the Law
      7. So what's the best day to worship? Every day
      8. Romans 14:5
    3. Monthly offerings (vv. 11-15)
      1. Rosh chodesh means the head of the month
      2. Speaks of routine
      3. The best form of life is a disciplined life
      4. Jewish months are lunar months, not solar
        1. Lunar calendar has 354 days
        2. Jewish month is 29-30 days
    4. Passover (v. 16)
      1. Speaks of redemption
      2. Of all the festivals in modern-day Israel, it is the one that most Jews still keep
      3. Exodus 12
      4. Jesus Christ is our Passover Lamb: when the lambs were being sacrificed in the temple, He died on the cross
      5. The Passover both commemorated and predicted redemption
      6. 1 Corinthians 5:7
      7. John 1:29
      8. Either you let the Lamb take your sin, or you have to die for your sin
    5. Feast of Unleavened Bread (vv. 17-25)
      1. Speaks of recuperation
      2. After the leaven was removed, your spiritual life was invigorated and you recuperated from all the haste of leaving Egypt
      3. The first day of the feast was Passover, but they are separate festivals
    6. Feast of Firstfruits and Feast of Weeks (Pentecost; vv. 26-31)
      1. Firstfruits was the first of the barley harvest in the spring
      2. The Feast of Weeks (Pentecost) was the end of the wheat harvest (summertime)
      3. Both speak of representation
        1. Firstfruits
          1. Speaks of the resurrection of Jesus Christ; 1 Corinthians 15:20
          2. If the firstfruits come, the rest is coming
          3. Jesus' resurrection requires your resurrection
        2. Weeks
          1. Representative of the church
          2. The church was born on the day of Pentecost; Acts 2:1-4
          3. God extended the harvest past the disciples, past the Jews, into the Gentiles
  3. Numbers 29
    1. There's a gap of about four months between the first three feasts and the next three feasts
      1. In the seventh month, Tishri, there are three festivals stuck together
      2. That gap of time possibly speaks of the church age
        1. The Jews rejected their Lamb and lost almost everything: their temple, the representation of animals being slain, etc.
        2. In the future, there will be an awakening of this
    2. Feast of Trumpets (vv. 1-6)
      1. It was a reminder that Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, was coming ten days later
      2. These ten days were days of reflection
        1. Yamim Nora'im is Hebrew for days of awe or repentance
        2. Yom Kippur is a solemn day of fasting, not feasting
      3. Passover is in the first Jewish month, Abib (Nisan), while the Jews don't celebrate their new year until the seventh month
    3. Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur; vv. 7-11)
      1. Speaks of repentance
      2. It became a time of rejoicing after fasting and the sacrifice of two goats
    4. Feast of Tabernacles (vv. 12-40)
      1. Seven days of sacrifices, then the eighth day
      2. Even today, Israelis build and live in lean-tos for a week to remember how their forefathers slept in the wilderness for forty years and God provided for them
      3. Speaks of relocation
      4. In the temple, it was the custom for one of the priests to go down from the temple mount to the Pool of Siloam
        1. The place where people could get fresh water
        2. Jesus healed a blind man and told him to wash in it; John 9:1-7
      5. The priest would take water from the pool and pour it on the courtyard of the temple, symbolizing how God provided water out of the rock in the desert; Exodus 17:1-7
      6. Then the people would sing Isaiah 12:3
      7. On the eighth day, the great day, the priest would do this twice
        1. On this day, Jesus in the temple cried out, "If anyone thirsts, let him come to Me and drink"
        2. John 7:37-39
  4. Closing
    1. Think of the enormity of these sacrifices—think of how many animals were killed in a year's time: 113 bulls, 32 rams, and 1,086 sheep
    2. Why so much sacrifice?
      1. It's really not too much to give
      2. Who provided all that they had to begin with? God did
      3. The same applies to tithing: everything is God's to begin with
    3. What we celebrate with Communion is that Jesus is the Passover Lamb
      1. Romans 8:32
      2. Whatever we give to Him, He provided it all to begin with
    4. Rather than the enormity of the sacrifices God demanded, think of the enormity of the sacrifice God Himself gave

Greek/Hebrew words: Rosh chodesh, Yamim Nora'im
Cross references: Exodus 12; 17:1-7; 20:8-11; Leviticus 23; Numbers 28-29; Isaiah 12:3;John 1:29; 7:37-39; 9:1-7; Acts 2:1-4; Romans 8:32; 14:5; 1 Corinthians 5:7; 15:20; Hebrews 9:22, 26; 1 John 1:9


Topic: The Law

Keywords: religion, religious, festivals, feasts, sacrifices, visual, sin, atonement, animals, Passover, Communion, Sabbath, worship, lamb, unleavened bread, firstfruits, resurrection, the Law

Transcript

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Introduction: Welcome to Expound our weekly worship and verse by verse study of the Bible. Our goal is to expand your knowledge of the truth of God as we explore the Word of God in a way that is interactive, enjoyable, and congregational.

Skip Heitzig: Let's pray together. Father, this is a unique evening where you call us to remember, to remember a sacrifice that was done so long ago on our behalf. Father, I pray that the Holy Spirit of God would bring things to our mind that maybe we need to deal with or confess here in a place like this in your presence. Certainly, it's safe to be in your presence and to unload and unburden our hearts. Father, I pray for brothers and sisters who are here who had a very difficult week. Lord, some who I just saw coming in and you could just see it wearing on them, life, circumstances, things with family or at work.

I pray, Father, that you would strengthen us as your people, as we gather in the mighty name of Jesus knowing that Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever. Help us, Lord, to understand and, Father, I pray that you'd help us to even be interested in what we're reading. I say that because we live in a culture that bombards us with constant visual changes, and the generation that we have before us is one that has a very, very short attention span. And so, Father, I pray that you'd help us to understand the importance of these foundational truths even from the Old Testament. Thank you for the opportunity, Lord that we have to gather as a family, in Jesus' name, amen.

We have two chapters ahead of us by the grace of God. I know I'm ambitious sometimes in these studies. Last week it was in my heart to go through four chapters and I made it through two, and so I'm not even going to tell you how many I want to do. We just kind of go until we stop, and this is the time of the week where we take the Lord's Supper together. So we have two chapters of Numbers before us and they're highly significant chapters, though we're not going to read every verse. I'll warn you right now, we're going to kind of sum it up, zero in on a few verses, and I'll explain why as we go through. Some of you grew up in a religious home.

Some of you in that religious background grew up in an austere and more solemn religious home filled with ceremonies and rituals and solemnity in them. And if you were an average kid and you grew up with that, you didn't see a whole lot of relevance in those religious expressions for the world in which you really lived; there was a disconnect. That's how I grew up. I grew up in a home where we practiced every week religious ceremonies that didn't have a lot to do with Skip's day in and day out life. It was highly irrelevant and very, very solemn. So when I was in high school and a band came through town from a church that eventually I would become a part of, this band came through to play music for the high school kids.

It was music about Jesus Christ, and it shocked me. It shocked me because the music was good. [laughter] They weren't playing organs, and singing hymns, they were playing guitars and it was something that I, as a high schooler, could relate to. They were talking my language, but they were talking about God. And I thought God couldn't be expressed in that kind of a language. I don't know why I thought that. It must have been from how I grew up and the churches I had been a part of. But it was my language, and I found myself liking the music, and so I was open to the message. These people that were singing were happy, they were rejoicing; there was joy.

And it dawned on me as a high schooler, "Is that even possible to be so happy and celebratory and talk about God doing it?" I'm serious. That's just not what I grew up watching and being a part of. I came to know the Lord shortly thereafter. I came into a relationship with him, and I was part of a church where I was part of the worship team. I played base and I sang, and, once again, I found myself having fun and doing it singing about the Lord. And I thought, "I don't know if this is right or not, but I sure like the way it feels." Now, I say all that because we are dealing in these two chapters with festivals. Just think of the term "festivals," "feasts." God would have feasts for his people, times of joy, times of remembrance, times of celebration.

Certainly, there were times of solemnity, as we will see, and reflection, but so often they were just to celebrate God in their daily life. That's what he wanted from them. So in chapters 28 and 29 we have observances that God has already said they should perform: daily sacrifices, weekly sacrifices, monthly sacrifices; besides that, the great festivals, the feasts of Passover and Unleavened Bread and Trumpets and the Feast of Weeks and Firstfruits and Tabernacles. And he tells them to meet together. There is to be a rhythm of life daily, weekly, monthly, yearly, annually, where God is at the center of their community and they rejoice in the Lord.

Now, a word about these gatherings, these offerings, these sacrifices: this is God's equivalent of "save the date." He's telling them, "Save the date. Write this in your appointment calendar. These are things I want you to do daily, weekly, monthly, annually. You save these dates." Now these were visual demonstrations. All of these celebrations, all of these offerings, all of these festivals were, were something they could see, not hear. It was like a drama being played out on the stage where visually rather than verbally they would get a picture. See, our worship is highly verbal, not as visual in our culture. I'm speaking words, you're understanding what I'm saying by the words that I use.

This was visual, not verbal back then. Now, it's a good thing that it's verbal because most of us couldn't stomach the visual. If I were to bring a lamb up here and say, "Well, let me demonstrate," and slit its throat and bleed it in front of you, some of you would pass out. That was part of their system. They were seeing acted out in drama form some of the great truths God was trying to get through to them by these festivals. It is the ancient equivalent of television. This was reality TV. They would gather together, at the center of their corporate life would be these offerings, these sacrifices, these visualizations, these dramatizations.

Now, from time to time it's good to ask the question, and anybody who's a newbie to the Old Testament will certainly ask the question: "Why so much blood? Why so many animals killed, slain? What's the deal with all that?" The deal with all of that is that if you want to approach God, you've got a big problem, all of us do, it is sin. And the only way to deal with sin is through something called atonement. Now, here's the verbal expression and then we'll see the visual. The verbal expression is "vicarious atonement." That's the theological tag, "vicarious atonement," which means a substitute will be killed so you don't have to be killed.

So if you want to approach God, it says in the book of Hebrews, chapter 9, "For almost all things were purified by blood, for without the shedding of blood there is no remission of sin." If you want to approach God who is perfect, you and I, who are imperfect, must have a basis to approach him with. And either you let someone or something take your place---that's a substitute. That's vicarious atonement---or you die for your own infractions and sin. So that dramatization is worked out before us in these festivals. Okay, so the last time we covered these---and they're repetitive. These sacrifices and offerings that we're reading about in these two chapters we've already looked at back in the book of Leviticus, chapter 23.

So you're asking, "So, why does God waste pages to say it again? Why would he repeat himself?" New generation, that's the answer. The old generation is dead. When those were given---and they didn't have printing presses or emails back then---it was a verbal command. That generation is dead, a new generation has come, they need to hear it again. And so it is for us. Every generation needs to hear the gospel. Why do we spend time every week, every month, every year going through the same Book, the same truths, the same gospel? Because every generation needs to hear it, and every generation needs to hear it again and again and again, because there are so many messages that are competing with "the message" that we need to be reminded of these truths.

And so this generation is reminded. So in chapter 28 we're going to go through just some of these sayings. I'm not going to read every verse, because what it does it talks about the occasion and what is required for the occasion. For example, let me sum it up for you: every day you bring two lambs, one in the morning, one in the evening. Besides the lambs you bring a grain offering, besides, the grain offering you bring oil that's mixed with it, and here's the concoction, and that is sacrifice. Every week you do what you do every day, but once a week on Sabbath day you double it. So it's two lambs in the morning and two lambs in the evening, and here's the grain and here's the oil that you mix with it for the concoction for the sacrifice. Then every month . . . and the recipes are given.

But for the festivals there's going to be two bulls and one ram and seven lambs and here's the grain and the oil. So we're just going to kind of highlight some of these festivals, especially since one of them is Passover, which communion is based on. You follow? So in verse 1 of chapter 28, "Now the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, 'Command the children of Israel, and say to them, "My offering, my food for my offerings made by fire as a sweet aroma to me, you shall be careful to offer to me at their appointed time." And you shall say to them, "This is the offering made by fire which you shall offer to the Lord: two male lambs in their first year without blemish, day by day, as a regular burnt offering. The one lamb you shall offer in the morning, the other lamb you shall offer in the evening." ' "

And the grain and the oil is added to that. So these are the daily sacrifices. And the daily sacrifices---a lamb in the morning, a lamb in the evening---speak of relationship. So there's this constant unbroken fellowship that I am having with my Creator based upon the shed blood of two lambs, one in the morning and one in the evening. So you begin your day---listen---and you end your day focusing on a lamb. So should we. We begin our day and end our day focusing on the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world, focusing on Jesus Christ. You begin your day offering that day to him; you close your day focusing on the Lamb. So every day these two sacrifices were given, unbroken fellowship. It speaks of relationship.

I remember as a boy, and I'm giving away---most of you know my background. But when I was a boy, I heard about what was called the "continual sacrifice of the mass." I didn't know what that meant and so they explained it to me in my classes that at any place on earth at any time they---the mass, the Holy Mass and the Eucharist is being offered somewhere in the world. It's supposed to be done every day and in every place so essentially there's this ongoing perpetuity, continual sacrifice of the mass, sacrifice of Jesus Christ dying for the sins of the world. Because they believe in a doctrine called "transubstantiation," that the host becomes the literal body and the wine becomes the literal blood of Christ.

So you're having this perpetual, continual sacrifice. Now what is that based on? That is not based on anything in the New Testament. It is based upon the Old Testament system which ended in Christ. Hebrews chapter 9 verse 26, "But Christ appeared once at the end of the ages to offer himself for sin." What the old covenant could never do because they had to keep doing it, keep doing it, keep doing it, Jesus did once for all. Which means if you and I blow it now, you don't bring a new lamb tomorrow and a new lamb tomorrow night, and a new lamb and the next day and a new lamb the next night; you talk to the Lamb himself who once for all---because it was a perfect sacrifice---was enough, sufficient.

"If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness." That's what you do, you confess to him. So your morning focuses on the Lamb; you're evening focuses on the Lamb. Now look at verse 9. We come to the second of the offerings; and that is, the Sabbath day. And the Sabbath speaks of rest. If the first one, the daily sacrifices speak of relationship, the second speaks of rest. That's what Sabbath means. Verse 9, " 'And on the Sabbath day two lambs in their first year, without blemish, and two-tenths of an ephah of fine flour as a grain offering mixed with oil, with its drink offering---this is the burnt offering for every Sabbath, besides the regular burnt offering with its drink offering.' "

Did you know that God instituted the Sabbath for us? It was for us. It was a gift to mankind. It's one of the Ten Commandments. And it's what I call the "maintenance law" of the Ten Commandments. God wants you to operate at peak operating possibility and he knows that if you just work seven days a week without a break, without a rest, you won't operate at peak. You need rejuvenation. You need recharging. And so he has given as a commandment to mankind, the Sabbath, rest, be rejuvenated. So every day, every week they would appear and they would offer the sacrifices and they would remember and recall and focus upon all that that celebration meant, including the Sabbath.

Something about the Sabbath---and if you go to Israel you'll see how it works. The whole week in Israel builds toward the Sabbath, looks forward to the Sabbath, so that by Friday afternoon people are already starting to slow down a little bit because Sabbath begins Friday evening and goes all the way through Saturday, through Saturday evening. So here's the deal: you'll see out in the streets in Jerusalem these flower stands, because it's customary when men come home Friday evening, to not come home without a beautiful bouquet of flowers for their wives. Every Friday you buy flowers for your wife and for the table to decorate it.

Because you're saying something to your children: "This day, this Saturday, this Sabbath, this Shabbat, this rest, is a chance for us to focus in on God and on the family God has given us. So it's a longer meal, a leisurely meal, customary work is not done. The whole week builds toward that Sabbath. Now, I'm often asked the question: "Well, when did the Sabbath change?" Answer: It never did. Sabbath is still the Sabbath. Shabbat is still Saturday: sundown Friday evening to sundown Saturday. Never changed. And that's usually followed by a question, because the first implies the second: "Well, is Sunday then the Christian Sabbath?" No, it's not. Sunday is the first day of the week; the Sabbath is the last day of the week.

Both of them speak of two completely different things. The Sabbath commemorated a finished creation. The first day of the week commemorated finished redemption. Jesus rose from the dead on the first day of the week. That is why the early church met on the first day of the week. Well, that brings up a whole discussion of: "Well, what's the proper day to meet then? Saturday, Sabbath? Are we to keep the Sabbath?" Interesting, all the Ten Commandments have a moral bent, a moral inclination, except for one, and that is the Sabbath. There's no morality attached to it. There certainly is obedience attached to it, because God said to do it, but there's no morality that's built in it.

So it's an amoral commandment. It doesn't mean it's nonmoral; it's just without a moral component. Therefore in the New Testament all the Ten Commandments are reiterated somewhere, except for this one. So are Christians commanded to keep the Sabbath? No. Now I'm telling you that because I notice this development in some believers. They're saved by God's grace and they want to quickly find the nearest law to get under bondage in. [laughter] "I'm just a little bit too free, so I'll go back to Judaism and I'll keep Passover and I'll keep Shabbat and I'll light the candles and I'll say the prayers." And part of it is simply a fascination with Judaism and our roots, but they get under the bondage of the law.

And I tell them, "Go read and meditate and memorize, if you need to, the book of Galatians. You don't need that. You're free from it." So what's the best day to worship? Every day. That's my view. And my view is substantiated by what Paul said. Listen to what he said, "One man esteems one day of the week over all the other days; another man esteems another day over all the other days." So here's a couple guys, and this guy says, "Sunday is the day to worship." The next guy goes, "No, no, no. Saturday is the day to worship." Then I come along and I go, "I think every day is the day to worship." And---now wait a minute---this is what Paul says, "Let each one be persuaded in his own my mind."

"One man esteems one day. Another one esteems the other. Let each man be persuaded in his own mind." So you've got this guy who's Seventh-day Adventist, "Saturday is the day to worship!" Great! If you're persuaded in your own mind, then worship God on Saturday. Go for it. God bless you. We have a Saturday night service in you want to come to that and you'll feel better about that, that's your day. You might say, "No. I'm---that's the old covenant and I'm not under that. I'm a New Testament believer. I believe Sunday designates the resurrection, so I'm gonna worship . . ." Great. We have three Sunday services on Sunday to choose from.

But I believe that Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, you should begin and end focusing on the Lord and you worship him. So that's, [applause] that's how I am persuaded. So Sabbath isn't---Sunday isn't the Christian Sabbath. Sunday is Sunday. Sabbath is Sabbath. Why don't I keep the Sabbath? I'm not Jewish. It was a covenant God gave to Israel. I'm not that, last time I checked. And even if I was, I'm under a new covenant and I do worship on Saturday. It just happens that that's just not the only day that I worship. I like to worship on all of them. That's the Sabbath. Now let's go to the monthly one. I'm taking a little bit too much time in my explanations.

Verse 11, here's the third one now. This is the monthly celebration. " 'At the beginning of your months you shall present a burnt offering to the Lord: two young bulls, one ram, and seven lambs in their first year, without blemish.' " The first of the month called in Hebrew Rosh Chodesh, the head of the month, the holy head of the month. You are hallowing a day, the first part of that month to the Lord. So God says, "I want you to celebrate daily, weekly, and monthly." If the first one speaks about relationship, the daily sacrifice, and if the weekly Sabbath speaks about rest, then the third, monthly, speaks about routine.

God wants to get you into the routine of every day, every week, and every month, the head of every month, the first day of every month setting that aside as unto to Lord. I think the best form of life is a disciplined life. You can---I think certain routines are good to establish. And certainly the routine of church, communion, celebrating together, Bible study, prayer---all those things are important disciplines. I will tell you this, that the Jewish months are based upon a lunar month, not upon a solar month. Not that that has a whole lot of importance, but it'll throw you off otherwise. So, the lunar calendar is based on 354, 3-5-4 days in the lunar calendar year; the solar is 365 and a third.

So the Jewish month is between 29 and 30 days typically. And as the years go on they actually have to insert a month. I've explained that at a previous time and I would just bog you down if I tried to explain more now, and it's not our point. Let's go to verse 16 and see the next one: " 'On the fourteenth day of the first month is the Passover of the Lord.' " Now this fourth celebration speaks of redemption. That's what the Passover is all about. And then it says---immediately it talks about another festival, " 'On the fifteenth day of this month is the feast; unleavened bread it shall be eaten for seven days.' " The Passover was a festival---by the way, of all of the festivals in modern-day Israel, it is the one festival that most Jews in Israel keep.

Ninety-nine percent of Israelis keep this one. It is that threshold moment that they look back and they remember Exodus, chapter 12, the death of the firstborn and the placing of the blood on the lintels and the doorposts. And it spoke to them of God redeeming them as a people going toward a new land, a covenant people. The death angel passed over, blood was shed, and we are redeemed. Also, it's important for us because we're taking tonight the Lord's Supper. Jesus Christ is our Passover Lamb. He died on Passover. When the lambs were being sacrificed in the temple, Jesus died on the cross. So, the Passover was both commemorative as well as predictive. It commemorated redemption; it predicted redemption.

It commemorated past redemption from Egypt; it predicted the coming redemption in Christ as it was celebrated. How do we know that? Because in the New Testament Paul says, "Christ is our Passover." He fulfills it. So this speaks of redemption. When John the Baptist saw Jesus, he said, "Behold! The Lamb of God who takes way the sin of the world!" That's what Passover speaks about, the Lamb takes away my sin. It still works the same way today. Either you let the Lamb take your sin or you have to die for your sin. So, the Lamb, Jesus that was slain. Now, in verse 17 I draw your attention to that, because Passover is treated in one verse followed by another festival that is separate but often placed together with Passover.

It's the Festival of Unleavened Bread on the fifteenth day, which is the day right after Passover. " 'Is the feast; unleavened bread it shall be eaten for seven days. On the first day you will have a holy convocation. You will do no customary work.' " This feast, Unleavened Bread, speaks of recuperation, recuperation. Let me explain. When the children of Israel left Egypt, they had no time to bake bread and watch it rise, leavened bread. They put yeast in it, it takes a while for that process to get you a loaf of bread. Because they were in such a hurry, they were told to bake bread without leaven, flat cakes. It would be like matzah bread today, like saltine crackers almost, but a little bit different, flatbread.

So, you take out the leaven, you bake the bread, and you move. But now they're in the land or they would be going to the land, and this would speak of the recuperation. After the leaven is removed your spiritual life is invigorated and you recuperate from all the haste of leaving Egypt. Now, because Passover and Unleavened Bread were so close together, I mean, one day apart, the seven-day feast, the first day is Passover, even though that's its own separate festival, it's the first day of Unleavened Bread, and it lasts for seven days. That is why so often they're just seen together, Passover and Unleavened Bread, but they're two separate festivals. One speaks of redemption; one speaks of recuperation.

Down to verse 26, " 'Also on the day of the firstfruits, when you bring a new grain offering to the Lord at your Feast of Weeks you shall have a holy convocation. You shall do no customary work.' " Now, offering number six and seven are two together. They're mentioned in the same verse: the Feast of Firstfruits and the Feast of Weeks or Pentecost it's called. But they're seen together. Now, firstfruits was the first of the barley harvest in the spring, the Feast of Weeks. So you'd count---after that you would count 7 weeks, 49 days, plus a day, that's 50 days. That's Pentecost, means 50, 50 days. That's where it comes from.

Pentecost was the end of the wheat harvest, so it extends these two festivals together: the beginning of the barley harvest to the summertime, the end of the wheat harvest. Both of these are seen together, the offerings are given, a holy convocation, and sacrifices are listed here. This is a feast of---listen---representation. Both of them represent something. The Feast of Firstfruits, according to First Corinthians 15 verse 20, speaks of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Paul says, "For Christ is risen from the dead," First Corinthians 15:20. "For Christ is risen from the dead, and has become the first-fruits of those who have fallen asleep."

You see, when you pluck off the first of the barley and you would wave that before the Lord---and I remember living in Israel when these feasts were being celebrated. So I really did get the visual of these young men and young ladies taking these sheaves, these first of the barley sheaves and waving them and dancing to music. And it was so expressive of the joy at the provision of God. But it spoke of something that was coming, something you can anticipate. The firstfruits speaks of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, just like the first of the barley harvest guarantees you if the first few grains are coming, the rest of the harvest is coming. The fact that you're just holding up the shoots shows you the rest is on the way.

That's the firstfruits. If the firstfruits come, the rest is coming. So listen, if Jesus rose from the dead, he's the firstfruits. Jesus' resurrection requires your resurrection, requires your resurrection, just as the Feast of Firstfruits requires the full harvest. So, the Firstfruits speaks of the resurrection. The second festival, the Feast of Weeks or Pentecost is representative of the church, just as firstfruits, the beginning of the barley harvest, Pentecost, the end of the wheat harvest shows you that the harvest is extended into a whole other species. So what's interesting is that the church was born on the day of Pentecost in Acts, chapter 2. God extended the harvest past the disciples, past Israel, past the Jews, into the Gentiles.

The church would be born and people from every nation, every kindred, every tongue would be gathered into that great harvest. It was a representation of what was to come. That's what these festivals speak about, and the sacrifices were given. Now, chapter 29. We're making good time. Interesting to make a note as we get into the next chapter: there's a gap of time between the first three feasts and the next three feasts of about four months. So, there's feasts that begin and are interspersed throughout the calendar year, then there's this gap where there are no festivals at all taking place, until the seventh month, the month of Tishri. In the month of Tishri, there are three festivals stuck together.

So there's this gap of time. It is my opinion, if I'm looking for a type, I believe that that gap of time in these feasts speaks of the church age. The Jews rejected their Lamb, rejected their Messiah. They lost their temple. They lost their priesthood. Effectively, they lost their city. They lost the representation of animals being slain because of that rejection. In the future, however, there will be an awakening of them, and that leads us into the next chapter. After the gap of time we now come to the seventh month, three feasts that are given. And the first one, or in our list number eight, is the Feast of Trumpets.

Notice, " 'In the seventh month, on first day of the month, you shall have a holy convocation,' " that means get everybody together, an assembly. " 'You shall do no customary work. For you it is a day of blowing the trumpets.' " This is the Feast of Trumpets. And Feast of Trumpets is a reminder, just like you have an alarm clock that goes aynk, aynk, aynk, the trumpets will go aynk, aynk, aynk, and it will remind you of something. And it would remind you that one of the High Holy Days is coming up. Ten days later would be Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. So the Feast of Trumpets, the silver trumpets according to Leviticus would be blown and it would remind you of what is coming up.

Now the next ten days after the blowing of the trumpets were days of reflection. How much reflection do you spend---are you occupied in, that you just actually sit and mull over your life, your choices, where you've gone, where you're at, where you want to go, who you are, and what you are before the Lord, what you need to change, what you need to repent of? That's what these ten days were about. They were called in Hebrew---you ready?---Yamim Nora'im. And Yamim Nora'im is Hebrew for days of awe or days of repentance. You're moving toward Yom Kippur. Yom Kippur is that one day of the year where there is no feasting. None. That's the day of fasting. That's the solemnity of the year.

That's the day you "afflict your souls" it will say. And the Jews interpreted that to mean that's the one day you don't feast, you fast, you withhold yourself from eating food. So verse 2, " 'You shall offer a burnt offering as a sweet aroma to the Lord: one young bull, one ram, seven lambs in their first year, without blemish.' " And that is the typical sacrificial recipe that is given along with a goat for a sin offering. And then the grain and the oil is also mentioned as well. Okay, now I'm going to throw you a little bit. The seventh month is Tishri, right? Remember that, Tishri? The first month---right, Passover is in the first month?---was called Abib. Later on it was given the name Nisan.

So you've got the first month, now you've got the seventh month. Now here's where I'm going to throw you. On the first day of the seventh month the Jews celebrate Rosh Hashanah, New Year. You're going, "Okay, now I'm really confused." You've got the first year where you got the first month, which is Passover month, and then you got the seventh month, and you celebrate New Year's Day on the seventh month." Exactly. You say, "I'm confused." Well, you shouldn't be, because there's two calendars: the religious calendar and the civic or civil calendar. You say, "Oh, that's so confusing." Well, it shouldn't be, because you do the same thing. When is our New Year's? January 1.

When does the school year begin? January 1? No. The school year begins in the fall, September or what is it now, July? [laughter] I mean they keep moving it to . . . [laughter] but it begins in the fall. That's the school year. That's when it begins. Businesses have what they call the "fiscal year," a whole different calendar. So it's simply a religious calendar and a civic calendar, but that is Rosh Hashanah. So, the sacrifices are given. Verse 7, " 'On the day of the seventh month you shall have a holy convocation. You shall afflict your souls; you shall not do any work.' " Now this is the Day of Atonement. Yom Kippur the Day of Atonement speaks of repentance. That's the one day when you "afflict your souls," not feasting but fasting.

If you remember from our previous studies, on this day two goats---one was sacrificed, one was the scapegoat. The lots were cast, the scapegoat went out into the wilderness. And once it could be seen no more, the relay went back to the temple and everybody rejoiced: "Our sins are carried away." And it became then a time of rejoicing after the fasting. So those sacrifices were given. And now we come to the tenth festival that is mentioned in these chapters, the one we end with, and that's in verse 12, that is the Feast of Tabernacles. " 'On the fifteenth day of the seventh month you shall have a holy convocation. You shall do no customary work, you shall keep a feast to the Lord for seven days.' "

Now during these seven days they would bring sacrifices to be slain, animals to be slain, blood to be shed. You'd bring 13 bulls on the first days, 12 bulls on the second day, 11 on third, 10, all the way to the eighth day, the last day. The seven days and then the great day, the eighth day of that feast, besides the rams, besides the lambs that were given, just an enormous amount of animals for this. Now, the Feast of Tabernacles commemorated in the Old Testament when the children of Israel lived outside. And so for one week a year during this week when they would have this festival, once the children of Israel got into the land, they would build a lean-to, like with leaves and sticks. And they would camp outside for an entire week.

If you make it to Israel during those this feast, modern-day Jerusalem, you'll see these little shacks. They're built everywhere. I mean, it just sort of likes like a ghetto in some places. But it's only there for a week. They take it down. They'll get palm leaves and sticks and they make this little shelter and they live in that shelter for a week. Why? Because they're going to remember during that week sleeping out under the stars, having a blanket because it gets a little cool at night, they're going to remember that their forefathers slept outside in tents for 40 years in the wilderness. And God provided for them, took care of them, brought water from the rock, manna from heaven.

So, how meaningful to a kid who would grow up going camping in a lean-to for a week during the year. And then having mom and dad tell him or her the stories of our forefathers out in the deserts and in tents and God provided for them. That would be pretty exciting. So the Feast of Tabernacles spoke about relocation, being relocated from one place to the new land, and the wilderness experiences, how God provided. So, all of those are given. Now go down to verse 35, all the sacrifices day by day all the way to the eighth day. " 'On the eighth day' "---verse 35, " 'On the eighth day you shall have a sacred assembly. You shall do no customary work."

" 'You shall present a burnt offering, an offering made by fire as a sweet aroma to the Lord: one bull, one ram, seven lambs in their first year without blemish' " Now I'm not going to tell you all the rituals that happened on that day once they got the temple, but it was the custom during these days for one of the priests in the temple to go down from the Temple Mount to the pool of Siloam---does that ring a bell, Siloam? Siloam is that water area in Jerusalem where people could get fresh water from the well, from the Gihon Spring that feeds the city. It was the place where Jesus healed the man, "Go wash in the pool of Siloam."

So the priest would do down to the Siloam pool, and take water in a gold vessel, walk up to the temple area, and pour water on the courtyard of the temple. The water being poured out symbolized God providing water out of the rock in the desert. This is all during the Feast of Tabernacles. So, you're sleeping outside, you're camping out under the stars, you go to the temple, and this priest throws the water down. In other words, "God satisfied us and our forefathers' thirst in the wilderness all those years." When the water was poured out, the people would sing in unison a verse out of Isaiah, chapter 12, which says, "With joy you shall draw water from the wells of salvation," salvation.

And there would be a big praiseathon in the temple. On eighth day of the feast the priest went down to the pool of Siloam twice and did that. It was the "great day of the feast," it's called. The convocation in the temple was bigger than normal, because it's the---every day is culminating. On that day the Bible says in the gospel of John, "On the last day of that feast Jesus in the temple cried out, 'If any man thirst, let him come to me and drink. For as the Scripture says, out of his innermost being will flow rivers of living water.' This he spoke," said John, "of his Holy Spirit." I wish that was on MP3. I'd love to be able to just hear and sense what that must have been like in the temple.

For when everybody's singing, " 'With joy you will draw water from the well of salvation!' Isn't it marvelous how God provided for our forefathers and gave them refreshment?" "If any man thirst, let him come to me and drink, out of his innermost being will flow rivers of living water." That's what happened on the eighth day of the feast, the great day in the New Testament. So the offerings are given. Let's finish it out. Verse 39, "'you shall present to the Lord at your appointed feasts (besides your vowed offerings, your freewill offerings) as your burnt offerings, your grain offerings, as your drink offerings and your peace offerings.' So Moses told the"---I'm going to insert a couple of words---the new batch of "the children of Israel everything, just as the Lord commanded."

Now, think of the enormity of these sacrifices just what you and I have just considered in the minutes we've been together. Think of how many animals have been killed in a years' time. If you add them up, you'll have 113 bulls, 32 rams, 1,086 sheep in one year. That's an enormous amount of bloodshed. And you might even be thinking, "Well, that's a lot of giving. That's a lot of sacrifice to give. Why so much sacrifice?" Now follow my thinking here. It's really not too much to give, because who provided those lambs to begin with? Who provided all that they have to begin with? God did. So, "Boy, God sure demands a lot of sacrifice, a lot. We have to give a lot to God." Really? Now just think that through.

He gave it all to you. And you could put, you could put tithing in there. "Boy, God demands 10 percent of my income to be given to his work? That's an awful lot." He's letting you keep 90. [laughter] And how much did he give you in the first place? All of it. All of it. It's all his. It's all his. When I was a kid, I gave my brother for his birthday one year a book. I was just a little tyke, maybe six, seven years old. I gave him a book, a hardback book. You know where I got the book? From his closet. [laughter] It was his book, but I figured he hadn't seen it in so long, he probably didn't even know he owned it. So I took it out of his closet and I wrapped it up and I gave it to him.

How much of a sacrifice did I make? Since he provided the book to begin with, it was his book. Or how about this: when I was young and it was Father's Day or it was my dad's birthday, my mom would give me some money to go buy a gift for my dad. And I'd spend it all on him---all of it. Was that a big deal? Was that a big sacrifice for me? No, because the money that she gave me was the money my dad earned to give to her to begin with, so it was his money. So you think of all of these sacrifices, even if God said, "I want you to lay your life down for me," God gave you life to begin with. And what we celebrate when we take communion is that Jesus did lay down his life.

He is the Passover Lamb, and besides that, he has provided so much more. It says in the book of Romans, chapter 8, "If God did not spare his own Son but freely gave him up for us all, how then shall he not with him also freely give us all things?" So if he gave his life and he freely gives us all things and provides for us, then whatever we give to him---our praise, our devotion, the raising of our hands, the expression of our lips, our time, our talent, our treasure---he provided it all to begin with. It's minuscule.

So rather than the enormity of the sacrifices God demanded, think of the enormity of the sacrifice God himself gave in putting up with these people, in bringing these people, in giving them a new land, in giving them redemption from slavery and promising to provide along the way. So you have with you close by or somewhere near you these elements with which we're going to take communion. We'll have you take those out at this time. And Jarrett, since he stood up, is going to come and he's going to pray for the bread and what it symbolizes and then we'll take the bread together.

Pastor Jarrett Petero: Father, all we can say is thank you. And with those simple words that's all I can say is thank you. Let's take the bread.

Skip Heitzig: Jesus did take the bread on the night of the Passover when he shared with his disciples that meal, we often call it the Last Supper. I love what Jesus said. He said, "I have so longed to take this meal with you before I suffer, with great desire or fervency I have desired to eat this Passover with you." And he said, "I won't partake of it again until I do it anew with you in my kingdom." That's something to look forward to, isn't it, sitting down at a meal with Jesus himself in the kingdom age? You will do it. You will do it. And he took the bread and he broke it as so often is done at Passover. And he gave the blessing in Hebrew and he distributed it to his disciples.

And he took what was commonly understood as the bread of the Passover that which was commemorative of deliverance, and made it something that is predictive of his own deliverance in the next few hours as he would go to Golgotha, the cross. And so it is for us too. We are looking back to the redemption of Jesus Christ; we are looking forward to his coming again. But then Jesus took the wine, the fourth cup of the Passover meal, the cup of redemption it is called. And he gave the blessing and he gave a new meaning to it, and said it was indicative of his blood, not the blood of a lamb in a temple, but the blood of the Lamb of God, a man, the God-man, would be shed within hours so that you and I today, tonight, and in the future can enjoy his provision. I'm going to ask Jesse who's up in front to pray for the juice.

Pastor Jesse Lusko: Father, we thank you that you are---you give us everything. You gave us life and creation and you gave us your Son as a sacrifice that we deserve death, we deserve punishment, but Jesus who is life came and died in our place. And we thank you for the blood that's so vivid it just shows us that you've paid everything, that everything's been made for our salvation and we rejoice in that and we look forward to the day when we're with you, when we see you face-to-face. We take the cup together.


Additional Messages in this Series

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10/23/2013
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Numbers 1
Numbers 1
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
The book of Numbers describes the wanderings of the nation of Israel in the wilderness. Because of their disobedience, what could've been an 11-day journey to the Promised Land turned into a 40-year trial. In this study, we see the reason for the book's title: the censuses in chapters 1 and 26. As we examine the list in chapter one, we learn about God's personal and caring nature.
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10/30/2013
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Numbers 2-3
Numbers 2-3
Skip Heitzig
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In Numbers 2 and 3, we are able to picture how the nation of Israel camped in the wilderness, and we look into the role of the Levitical priests. In this study, important principles about ministry become apparent, and we are reminded that God takes worship seriously.
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11/13/2013
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Numbers 4-5
Numbers 4-5
Skip Heitzig
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In Numbers 4-5, God continues to give instructions to Moses and Aaron for the nation of Israel, and another census is taken. As we study this text, we are given insight into God's view of service and what our relationship with Him should look like.
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11/20/2013
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Numbers 6-7
Numbers 6-7
Skip Heitzig
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As we study Numbers 6-7, we see some of the ways that God's chosen people separated themselves to the Lord and worshiped Him. As the body of Christ, we must also remember that the Lord should be the center of our lives and that our worship to Him is about giving rather than getting.
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1/8/2014
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Numbers 8-9
Numbers 8-9
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As we consider Numbers 8-9, we uncover important correlations between the Levitical priesthood and Jesus Christ, our High Priest and Sacrifice, and discover the beautiful portrait of Jesus provided in the Passover. We also learn how believers are like the Levites: redeemed, cleansed, and set apart to serve the Lord. We have a reason to celebrate!
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1/15/2014
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Numbers 10-11
Numbers 10-11
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In Numbers 10-11, the nation of Israel leaves Mount Sinai and continues their journey to the Promised Land. As we study these chapters, we see the beginning of Israel's disobedience and learn how God's Word is like the manna the Lord provided.
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1/22/2014
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Numbers 12:1-13:16
Numbers 12:1-13:16
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As we consider this passage, we see Israel's continued disobedience as even Moses' own siblings spoke out against him. But rather than retaliate, Moses responded with humility and faithfulness. We learn that it's important to cultivate this attitude whenever we face difficulty.
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1/29/2014
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Numbers 13:17-14:45
Numbers 13:17-14:45
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In Numbers 13, the nation of Israel finally reached the Promised Land, and they had to make a big decision. Their lack of trust in the Lord led them to make the wrong choice, resulting in harsh consequences. In this study of Numbers 13-14, we are presented with a similar decision: do we limit ourselves with unbelief or trust God to carry out His best plans for us?
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2/5/2014
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Numbers 15
Numbers 15
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After learning about some of Israel's failures in Numbers 13-14, we now consider Numbers 15, where God gives His people a fresh start. He makes a new promise to a new generation and gives a new set of laws. As we examine these laws, we learn how they can be applied to our lives. We also remember the good and perfect work of the cross as we partake in Communion.
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2/12/2014
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Numbers 16
Numbers 16
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In Numbers 16, the children of Israel once again begin to complain as one of the leaders stirs up a rebellion against Moses. As the Lord's chosen leader, Moses challenges the opposition and pleads with the Lord to spare the people from destruction. As we study these events, we are challenged to search our own hearts and discover where the Lord has called us to serve Him.
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2/26/2014
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Numbers 17:1-18:23
Numbers 17:1-18:23
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Before diving into this text, we learn why it's important to study the book of Numbers. Then looking closely at Numbers 17-18, we continue to see God reveal Himself to the children of Israel in response to their complaints and disobedience. His mercy becomes apparent as we discover that our service to Him is actually His gift to us.
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3/5/2014
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Numbers 18:21-19:22
Numbers 18:21-19:22
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In this study of Numbers, we continue to look into the duties of the Levitical priests and learn about the laws of purification. As we partake in Communion, we see how this text points to Christ and learn how He has fulfilled the Law.
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3/12/2014
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Numbers 20
Numbers 20
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Numbers chapter 20 picks up thirty-seven years after the events in chapter 19, and the new generation of God's chosen people have started falling into old patterns of sin. In this study, Pastor Skip unveils a typology of Christ and shares insight into how we can deal with anger and grief.
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3/19/2014
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Numbers 21:1-22:13
Numbers 21:1-22:13
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The deaths of Miriam and Aaron marked the end of Israel's wandering as they prepared to march to the Promised Land. Still, the people became discouraged and complained against God and Moses again. We learn about facing discouragement and are introduced to a man who will be prominent in the coming chapters.
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4/2/2014
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Numbers 22:10-23:30
Numbers 22:10-23:30
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In Numbers 22, we are introduced to a new character in the Bible, Balaam, who was considered a false prophet. Balak, the king of Moab, summoned Balaam to curse the nation of Israel so they would stop their advancement into Moab. As we study these events, we learn a lesson about dealing with enemies and are challenged to examine ourselves for self-righteousness.
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4/23/2014
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Numbers 24-25
Numbers 24-25
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The Lord used the false prophet Balaam to bless the nation of Israel, and through Balaam's final prophecy in Numbers 24, God sealed the fate of Israel and its surrounding nations. But even though the Lord blessed His people, they still sinned, worshiping the gods of other nations. When God poured out His wrath on their sin in Numbers 25, we actually see the depth of His mercy and patience.
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4/30/2014
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Numbers 26-27
Numbers 26-27
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Numbers 26-27 covers the second census of Israel, addresses inheritance issues, and introduces the next leader of God's chosen people. As we study these chapters, we see again how God is deeply involved with His children, and we are challenged to grow by actively seeking the Lord.
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5/14/2014
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Numbers 30-31
Numbers 30-31
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Numbers 30-31 can be summed up in three words: vows, vengeance, and victory. In these chapters, God gives the children of Israel a set of regulations for vows, they war against the Midianites, and the Lord gives them victory. As we apply the text to our lives, we learn that our word is sacred, vengeance is the Lord's business, and God gives victory to those who are obedient.
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5/21/2014
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Numbers 32-34
Numbers 32-34
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In Numbers 32-34, two and a half tribes refuse to enter Canaan, but in exchange for their help in the battle for the Promised Land, God gives them the land of Gilead. Then when the boundaries of the Promised Land are drawn, we find out Israel only occupied one-tenth of what God promised Abraham. In this study, we are challenged to ask ourselves: Do we sit on the sidelines while our brothers and sisters go to battle for the Lord? And are we content to forfeit the inheritance God has for us?
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5/28/2014
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Numbers 35-36
Numbers 35-36
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In the last two chapters of Numbers, God assigned cities for the tribe of Levi to dwell in, gave instructions for the cities of refuge, and enacted a new law concerning the marriage of female heirs. This book ends similar to how it began: with God at the center of His children's lives. As we wrap up the book of Numbers, we see God's overwhelming mercy, a prophetic picture of our High Priest and Redeemer, and God's view of the sanctity of life. Even though generations have died in the wilderness, God's plan, purpose, and work in the lives of His people are very much alive.
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There are 20 additional messages in this series.